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Actor and Musician George Segal (1934-2021)


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Did anyone mention The Quiller Memorandum (mostly British cast - Alec Guiness is a no brainer, but, for those of you who have seen The Red Shoes, one of the dancers is in the film, as well as Senta Berger, George Sanders, and Max Von Sydow (yes I know he was in many Ingmar Bergman (?) films).

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The Goldbergs is one of the funniest things I've ever seen on television, with fine contributions from George. 

It's one of those things you get or you don't.   Like Citizen Kane.

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11 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

The Goldbergs is one of the funniest things I've ever seen on television, with fine contributions from George. 

It's one of those things you get or you don't.   Like Citizen Kane.

And if you don't, it's probably because you were actually ALIVE during the 80's, and remembered that John Cusack holding up the boom-box did not happen the same year as the Karate Kid and the Simon game.  🤦‍♂️  At least "Stranger Things" gave us a horror story to go with the Millennial love-hate decade-shaming; here, it was just "Transformers: Bumblebee" without the robots.

I remember seeing the first Goldbergs episode on an online focus group, as our narrator-kid explains the decade:  First reaction--"80's?  Oh, it's a network knockoff of VH1's 'I Love the 80's'!"  Second reaction, after the family-sitcom nostalgia kicks in--"Oh, I see, it's Wonder Years II!"  Third reaction was just wanting it to end, apart from realizing that even old grizzled comic-warrior George Segal was funnier than anyone else in the room.

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1 hour ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Did anyone mention The Quiller Memorandum (mostly British cast - Alec Guiness is a no brainer, but, for those of you who have seen The Red Shoes, one of the dancers is in the film, as well as Senta Berger, George Sanders, and Max Von Sydow (yes I know he was in many Ingmar Bergman (?) films).

I was thinking of The Quiller Memorandum when I heard the news about George Segal.

I also remember him playing his banjo on Johnny Carson with his wife, someone he met at a class reunion, if I recall correctly.

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I  liked  him  in  The  Hot  Rock  1972  an  great  caper  movie and  cast.  The  cast  was  Robert Redford,  Ron Leibman,  Paul  Sand,  Moses Gunn  and  Zero Mostel  in  that film. George  Segal  made  an  great  contribution  to  cinema  and   I  will  miss  him.

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That’s too bad and so sad.  He was another really great and really funny guy too.  Wasn’t he?  Besides The Goldberg’s on ABC.  There was this TV Land Original on TV Land called Retired At 35.  Where he played a father and his son moved in with him.  If I remember right?  It was hysterical and he was hysterical on it too and the last time I saw Mike Nicholes’s Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Wolf here on TCM.  It was so cool seeing him in that movie.  He will surely be missed.  Won’t he?  I’m guessing there will be a tribute to him here on TCM right.  I’ll be watching and he had to have been on Johnny Carson right?  I’m going to check on the Johnny Carson YouTube channel a little later.  But if anyone could maybe post videos and pictures on here.  That would be great too.  RIP George Segal.  We all really love you and we’ll all really miss you.

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28 minutes ago, cinemaman said:

I  liked  him  in  The  Hot  Rock  1972  an  great  caper  movie and  cast.  The  cast  was  Robert Redford,  Ron Leibman,  Paul  Sand,  Moses Gunn  and  Zero Mostel  in  that film. George  Segal  made  an  great  contribution  to  cinema  and   I  will  miss  him.

The Hot Rock is great fun. Redford had no business as Dortmunder but the rest of the cast fits beautifully.  I'd like to see that one again soon.

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36 minutes ago, David Guercio said:


That’s too bad and so sad.  He was another really great and really funny guy too.  Wasn’t he?  Besides The Goldberg’s on ABC.  There was this TV Land Original on TV Land called Retired At 35.  Where he played a father and his son moved in with him.  If I remember right?  It was hysterical and he was hysterical on it too and the last time I saw Mike Nicholes’s Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Wolf here on TCM.  It was so cool seeing him in that movie.  He will surely be missed.  Won’t he?  I’m guessing there will be a tribute to him here on TCM right.  I’ll be watching and he had to have been on Johnny Carson right?  I’m going to check on the Johnny Carson YouTube channel a little later.  But if anyone could maybe post videos and pictures on here.  That would be great too.  RIP George Segal.  We all really love you and we’ll all really miss you.

Yes.

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Well, this sucks. In spite of him being in one terrible film in the 70s [Blume in Love], he was otherwise a consummate professional, almost always great to watch. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf is of course tops, but I want to also she a light on some of his other great films: the all-star melodrama Ship of Fools, the twistedly hilarious dark comedy No Way To Treat a Lady with him chasing a Jack-the-Ripper type serial killer played by an over-the-top Rod Steiger and while also trying to romance Lee Remick, the compulsive gambling film California Split with Elliot Gould, the mid-life crisis film Loving with his character's adultery going public in the worst possible way, and my personal favorite, Who is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe, a dynamite and inventive comedy that is one of the best comedies of its era, between his bickering chemistry with Jacqueline Bissett, and with Robert Morley stealing his every scene as an acid-tounged food critic.

 

I feel bad in a way that his post-70s performances were usually so tiny in films, though he was great in For the Boys. His small roles in To Die For, The Mirror Has Two Faces, Flirting with Disaster, and The Cable Guy were still eye-catching, as was a multilayered guest spot on Murder She Wrote in 1993 that rates as one of that series' great guest turns. This is a big passing for me and one that hurts. He will be missed.

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2 hours ago, Marianne said:

I also remember him playing his banjo on Johnny Carson with his wife, someone he met at a class reunion, if I recall correctly.

So he DOES play banjo!  I always remember that clip of "The Draft-Dodger Rag" from the 60's Smothers Brothers show, but it always said that was Segal on banjo, and I'd always thought that was young Steve Martin, who got his first break on the third season:

(Sure looks like young Steve, before his hair iced over...) 

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When I think of George Segal I think of BLUME IN LOVE (1973). It was a first date movie with a girl I was particularly fond of. Funny what reminds you of things.

Another first date movie was LOOKING FOR MR GOODBAR (1977). That relationship got off to a curious start and kinda went off the rails from there. 🤪

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It was always a treat to watch Segal singing and playing the banjo during appearances on NBC's "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson." But here's a segment in which he also brought a trombone.

 

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Besides being a terrific actor, I always thought he'd be a great guy to hang with in real life, and due to how he always conducted himself on talk shows such as the one shown above.

(...R.I.P., George)

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George with the Smothers Brothers in 1967, performing the Phil Ochs novelty-protest song, "Draft Dodger Rag."

Edit: I see this is a repeat. Woops. A delete option would be handy here. 

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It's interesting, because my husband is somewhat into classic film because I am so into it, yet  he has no idea who George Segal is. I went through his filmography trying to find something he could instantly identify with, and I realize that during  Segal's best decade - the 70s - he was mainly in films of interest to people in their 30s and 40s and that my husband - then a teenager - would probably not have sought out such entertainment at that time. And plus they were not the kind of films that age that well. I found one film I had forgotten about - "Carbon Copy" - turns out that has Denzel Washington in a very early role playing Segal's son.  But the husband had never seen that one either. 

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16 minutes ago, LsDoorMat said:

It's interesting, because my husband is somewhat into classic film because I am so into it, yet  he has no idea who George Segal is. I went through his filmography trying to find something he could instantly identify with, and I realize that during  Segal's best decade - the 70s - he was mainly in films of interest to people in their 30s and 40s and that my husband - then a teenager - would probably not have sought out such entertainment at that time. And plus they were not the kind of films that age that well. I found one film I had forgotten about - "Carbon Copy" - turns out that has Denzel Washington in a very early role playing Segal's son.  But the husband had never seen that one either. 

I had an older sister who took me to all the grown-up 70s movies, though she wasn't exactly of age herself. She had an adult air and no ticket sellers ever gave us any trouble, except in one memorable case. (I really doubt they cared, they were kids themselves.)  Otherwise I would have missed a lot of the great Rs of the era.

George's stuff was mostly PG, though, and the one we saw that I recall most was The Duchess and the Dirtwater Fox.

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18 minutes ago, LuckyDan said:

I had an older sister who took me to all the grown-up 70s movies, though she wasn't exactly of age herself. She had an adult air and no ticket sellers ever gave us any trouble, except in one memorable case. (I really doubt they cared, they were kids themselves.)  Otherwise I would have missed a lot of the great Rs of the era.

George's stuff was mostly PG, though, and the one we saw that I recall most was The Duchess and the Dirtwater Fox.

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Oh, believe me the rating wouldn't have stopped him. He was making completely illegal beer runs to Canada from New York when he was 16. 

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Just now, LsDoorMat said:

Oh, believe me the rating wouldn't have stopped him. He was making completely illegal beer runs to Canada from New York when he was 16. 

I'm disgusted with the both of you. (George would probably be cool with it, though.)

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Just now, LuckyDan said:

I'm disgusted with the both of you.

I didn't meet him until we were 34, so that was just one of his many stories. By the time I met him, he was a solid citizen. 

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5 hours ago, EricJ said:

So he DOES play banjo!  I always remember that clip of "The Draft-Dodger Rag" from the 60's Smothers Brothers show, but it always said that was Segal on banjo, and I'd always thought that was young Steve Martin, who got his first break on the third season:

(Sure looks like young Steve, before his hair iced over...) 

He started on a uke, then realized he couldn't play in a band with just a uke, so he switched 4-string banjo. 

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3 minutes ago, LsDoorMat said:

I didn't meet him until we were 34, so that was just one of his many stories. By the time I met him, he was a solid citizen. 

Ah. Good. Good. (Disregard my PM with the bible quotations.)

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  • MikaelaArsenault changed the title to Actor and Musician George Segal (1934-2021)

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