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Level9Giggler
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     I saw this movie for the first time tonight. As a former high school teacher, I saw many uses in the classroom. First, I will list the relevances that teachers are often required to provide before letting a movie be shown in class, even when a substitute will be present. Then I’ll ask everyone ways of testing students over the material. 
     I invite others to add to either list. 
     What would be nice is a picture-in-picture version of the movie that did not interfere with the display of closed captioning already on the film while  taking advantage of the movie’s ratio that creates a lot of black space. Moving the image down so the black space is at the top and can then contain notes, like this dance style is “soft shoe”. Students then have notes to write while watching the movie. Of course, students on in IEP may have the notes provided so they may focus on the movie. After the movie, a test incorporating still shots from the movie can be completed. Can this be done with Apple’s Keynote or other software teachers might have? 
     First, relevance list:

  • Three men meeting up after 10 years, because they were best friends 10 years ago, relevant to high school seniors and expectations for future reunions
  • ”I like myself” song and dance routine relevant to all ages as good counseling. Best context is in the whole movie, not a cut scene. 
  • Portrays an image of a successful, strong female lead who is independent, intelligent, and capable of doing things on her own. 
  • Gene Kelly does an entire dance skit on skates, rollerskates! This is an level of athleticism that may not be appreciated by modern students, however it should be brought to their attention.
  • The style of soft shoe is done when the three characters reminisce in three different video panels.  This is relevant to dance and therefore drama. 
  • In politics the idea of a single hoodlum, a hamburger joint owner with wife and kids, and a high class salesman without kids, all getting along. 
  • The scene with the ad for Kleanse Right, towards the end of the movie, compare that in politics/history class with the modern video YouTube trends.
  • History and politics: the number with the ad for cleanse right, how did that reflect the current YouTube laws from the FCC regarding declaring supporters
  • Closes with a song appropriate for graduation 
  • Nominated for 2 Academy Awards
  • Shakespeare was 500+ years ago, but is referred to in a way that shows why it is good to know your quotes. 
  • Golden age of Hollywood is part of American history and arguably as widely disseminated as any Shakespeare.

oh what a tangled web we weave when first we attempt to educate...while having a substitute teacher. 

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1 minute ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I always liked this one, especially Dolores Gray's song "Thanks A Lot But No Thanks". It has a very funny line "I've got a guy whose Clifton Webb and Marlon Brando combined!" I thought that was a strange combination.

She might be disappointed, based on all those pesky rumors...

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Gene's roller skate number is one of my all time favorite dance numbers. Always puts a smile on my face and I always rewind and watch it again several times each viewing. Amazing how he managed that.

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16 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

Watched it with a first-timer the other night.  He was amazed at this number, but thought Dolores Gray was a bit too hammy (even though the character is OTT).

I disagree. Love Dolores Gray, she was suppose to be over the top hammy in that role. She had a fabulous singing voice. I've seen the film many times over the years, maybe if you watch the film a few more times you might change your mind. Next time Designing Woman is shown and The Opposite Sex ( a musical version of the Women) try to watch it. she's great in those. Dolores was a Broadway star and flamboyant but her singing voice was so great and had a great flair for comedy. She's a favorite of mine, so don't diss her ( i'm teasing) but give her another chance, 
 

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1 hour ago, lavenderblue19 said:

I disagree. Love Dolores Gray, she was suppose to be over the top hammy in that role. She had a fabulous singing voice. I've seen the film many times over the years, maybe if you watch the film a few more times you might change your mind. Next time Designing Woman is shown and The Opposite Sex ( a musical version of the Women) try to watch it. she's great in those. Dolores was a Broadway star and flamboyant but her singing voice was so great and had a great flair for comedy. She's a favorite of mine, so don't diss her ( i'm teasing) but give her another chance, 
 

It wasn't my opinion.  It was the opinion of the person watching it for the first time.

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13 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

It wasn't my opinion.  It was the opinion of the person watching it for the first time.

Read your comment too quickly,  since it wasn't your opinion does that mean you thought Dolores played that character the way it was meant to be played, hammy and OTT. Hope so. 

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7 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Read your comment too quickly,  since it wasn't your opinion does that mean you thought Dolores played that character the way it was meant to be played, hammy and OTT. Hope so. 

Yes, I know that her character was written that way.

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Sadly, Gray came to films during the last days of the studio musicals and never achieved stardom. She had better luck on Broadway. She was a hit in the musical Destry Rides Again with Andy Griffith and won a Tony Award for Carnival in Flanders. She also starred in the London premiere of Follies in the 80s and got to sing the great Sondheim number, "I'm Still Here".  (I have the cast recording) and earlier in her career in Annie Get Your Gun in London.. She also appeared in nightclubs.

One of her numbers in It's Always Fair Weather was cut (with Michael Kidd) Unsure if its included on the DVD or soundtrack. You can see where it was in the film. The two go off together before the show but arent seen again until the show. There was also a number with Kelly and Charisse cut (Love is a Racket or something similar)

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13 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Sadly, Gray came to films during the last days of the studio musicals and never achieved stardom. She had better luck on Broadway. She was a hit in the musical Destry Rides Again with Andy Griffith and won a Tony Award for Carnival in Flanders. She also starred in the London premiere of Follies in the 80s and got to sing the great Sondheim number, "I'm Still Here".  (I have the cast recording) and earlier in her career in Annie Get Your Gun in London.. She also appeared in nightclubs.

One of her numbers in It's Always Fair Weather was cut (with Michael Kidd) Unsure if its included on the DVD or soundtrack. You can see where it was in the film. The two go off together before the show but arent seen again until the show. There was also a number with Kelly and Charisse cut (Love is a Racket or something similar)

Maybe these will show up in the outtakes presentation on HBOMax in May...

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On 4/14/2021 at 4:51 PM, Hibi said:

Gene's roller skate number is one of my all time favorite dance numbers. Always puts a smile on my face and I always rewind and watch it again several times each viewing. Amazing how he managed that.

I like to rub it in the face of 80's haters who think Gene Kelly was "embarrassed" to roller-skate in "Xanadu".  

(And recommend it to the new fans who say "OMG, I didn't know he could do that!")

On 4/12/2021 at 11:52 PM, Level9Giggler said:

First, relevance list:

  • Three men meeting up after 10 years, because they were best friends 10 years ago, relevant to high school seniors and expectations for future reunions

I always found the movie historically time-capsule relevant for explaining how the postwar 40's became the Eisenhower 50's (leading to a lot of disgruntled domestic humor about married men), when returning GI's, some of whom had no taste of real life fresh out of high school, had to suddenly embrace responsible working aduthood after four guy-years facing danger with their buddies in the Army, and another ten after their discharges...Which created a sense of identity crisis that men had to wrestle with all the way into the Rat-Race early 60's.  Some students who had dads fresh home from 00's Baghdad or Afghanistan might know the context.

Not the HAPPIEST topic for a musical, but good to study.

Also:

  • The decline of original movie musicals in the 50's, as nightclub shows and variety were disappearing, and "Putting on a show" now had to be for television, as it competed with both Broadway and the movies.

(Qv. "White Christmas", which also deals with GI's who missed their WWII Sarges so much, they went back to Korea, and puts the Big Show on a TV broadcast...)

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