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Did Anyone Catch King of Jazz?


Hibi
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Last night? I recorded it to watch at a later date, but did peek at parts of it. I find these early 2 strip technicolor films fascinating. What was the 3rd strip? Blue? The coloring is all pastels, dark backgrounds and no sharp focus or brightness as the later technicolor. I also enjoy watching these studio musical salutes from the early 30s. I hadn't heard of this one. Am glad the color prints still exist.

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I would guess that might be the ONLY thing that would be impressive about it.  Besides a couple of ambitious dance routines.  But....

I always thought Paul Whiteman was the most APTLY named "jazz" musician to ever lead a "jazz" band!   :rolleyes:

Sepiatone

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2 hours ago, Hibi said:

Last night? I recorded it to watch at a later date, but did peek at parts of it. I find these early 2 strip technicolor films fascinating. What was the 3rd strip? Blue? The coloring is all pastels, dark backgrounds and no sharp focus or brightness as the later technicolor. I also enjoy watching these studio musical salutes from the early 30s. I hadn't heard of this one. Am glad the color prints still exist.

From the Wikipedia:

Convinced that there was no future in additive color processes, Comstock, Wescott, and Kalmus focused their attention on subtractive color processes. This culminated in what would eventually be known as Process 2 (1922) (in the later 1900s commonly called by the misnomer "two-strip Technicolor"). As before, the special Technicolor camera used a beam-splitter that simultaneously exposed two consecutive frames of a single strip of black-and-white film, one behind a green filter and one behind a red filter.[11][12]

The difference was that the two-component negative was now used to produce a subtractive color print. Because the colors were physically present in the print, no special projection equipment was required and the correct registration of the two images did not depend on the skill of the projectionist.

The frames exposed behind the green filter were printed on one strip of black-and-white film, and the frames exposed behind the red filter were printed on another strip. After development, each print was toned to a color nearly complementary to that of the filter: orange-red for the green-filtered images, cyan-green for the red-filtered ones. Unlike tinting, which adds a uniform veil of color to the entire image, toning chemically replaces the black-and-white silver image with transparent coloring matter, so that the highlights remain clear (or nearly so), dark areas are strongly colored, and intermediate tones are colored proportionally. The two prints, made on film stock half the thickness of regular film, were then cemented together back to back to create a projection print. The Toll of the Sea, which debuted on November 26, 1922, used Process 2 and was the first general-release film in Technicolor.

End of Wikipedia.

Thus films could not do purple until the three strip Technicolor process was perfected in the 1930s. "Service With A Smile" is a short and an early adopter of the three strip system. 

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