Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, Judith laucka said:

I’m fascinated by the 1930s movie And The Rains Came. Tyrone took second billing behind Myrna Loy. Surprisingly there isn’t even a kiss in that movie barely a hug. I guess that was not allowed back then. However they carry it off with a lot of suggestive comments. The relationship between the Brent character and the teenage girl was allowed but I found that somewhat shocking. Myrna in her memoir said she was taken w Tyrone and was open to a romance but he was under the thumb of his French wife (stated jokingly). The most amazing part of that film was the unbelievable special effects long before computer generated ones. 

Kissing between a married woman and her suiter did occur and wasn't a violation of the Code.    But kissing or too much sexual type behavior between people of two different races was forbidden.   That is the reason there isn't a kiss between the Power and Loy characters in this fine film.

My favorite George Brent performance;  I.e.  he gets to shine in this film instead of just being a second banana to the female lead like he is in the Warner Davis films etc...

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/6/2021 at 11:38 AM, jamesjazzguitar said:

Kissing between a married woman and her suiter did occur and wasn't a violation of the Code.    But kissing or too much sexual type behavior between people of two different races was forbidden.   That is the reason there isn't a kiss between the Power and Loy characters in this fine film.

My favorite George Brent performance;  I.e.  he gets to shine in this film instead of just being a second banana to the female lead like he is in the Warner Davis films etc...

 

The whole Hays code fascinates me. Was it written down or made up?  We all know that no one lived that silly life even then. It was just hidden under the bed but was never true.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Judith laucka said:

The whole Hays code fascinates me. Was it written down or made up?  We all know that no one lived that silly life even then. It was just hidden under the bed but was never true.  

Google Hays Code and you can see the pages upon pages of the restrictions.   Many are racist or sexist,  and some are just insane.    

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

So I thought I'd break this down by studio...

screen

Tyrone Power Summer Under the Stars on TCM

marie antoinette ... MGM
the rising of the moon ... WB
the long gray line ... COL
witness for the prosecution ... UA
the razor's edge ... FOX
the black rose ... FOX
blood and sand ... FOX
the mark of zorro ... FOX
nightmare alley ... FOX
a yank in the r.a.f. ... FOX
abandon ship ... COL

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Judith laucka said:

Wait a minute, I totally neglected my favorite The Razors Edge

Difficult type of movie to make but the 1946 version as directed by Edmund Goulding does a good job.

The Razor's Edge (Nov. 19, 1946) | OCD Viewer

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand that Somerset Maugham also wrote a screenplay that was replaced by Lamar Trotti’s version. I wonder if that screenplay still exists. In the movie version, Larry remains pure as the driven snow vs the book where Larry (oh my!) succumbs to the flesh.  Despite that, the moral pull between Larry and Isabel remains the focus of the film. Larry believes that there is a higher calling beyond our own desires where Isabel feels she has the right to fulfill her wants snd that includes wanting Larry. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Judith laucka said:

I understand that Somerset Maugham also wrote a screenplay that was replaced by Lamar Trotti’s version. I wonder if that screenplay still exists. In the movie version, Larry remains pure as the driven snow vs the book where Larry (oh my!) succumbs to the flesh.  Despite that, the moral pull between Larry and Isabel remains the focus of the film. Larry believes that there is a higher calling beyond our own desires where Isabel feels she has the right to fulfill her wants snd that includes wanting Larry. 

Anne Baxter steals the movie in my opinion. While Gene Tierney is lovely to look at, I always felt Baxter was a much stronger actress. And that scene with her in the opium den is very memorable. Totally deserving of the Oscar.

Then we have Clifton Webb playing a very over the top neurotic and Herbert Marshall trying to balance everything with his regal performance. In some ways Tierney & Power are overshadowed by the other players in this movie. Meanwhile, handsome and charming John Payne is barely able to register. Yet it's still a great movie to watch. The production values are exquisite.

If it wasn't for his part in the final sequence, I wouldn't remember Tyrone Power in this movie. I'd remember Baxter and Webb mostly.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I couldn’t disagree more. While everyone was superb, Tyrone and Gene totally explained the Larry and Isabel relationship. Without them, the whole plot disintegrates. I feel it’s a complete picture from start to finish when the camera focuses on Larry when he arrives til the end when Larry reveals his disdain for her. This takes nothing away from Baxter’s Oscar performance 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I’m about to compile a list of Tyrone’s comedies to list and discuss starting w Love is News to The Luck of the Irish. He did it all from dramas, comedies, swashbucklers, westerns, spy, war and all the rest. He looked comfortable doing it all. He was a very versatile actor 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...