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A Walk on the Noir Side


rohanaka

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> But is there such a thing as a cheap dame?

 

 

Well, of course, all dames cost money.

 

A ?cheap? one might cost us men a lot of money, but a ?high class dame? will cost us much more. :)

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*The Narrow Margin* was ok. Some of the shots were amazing..... I really enjoyed anything that took place in the dark or the way they used the length of the train to squeeze some suspense out of the story. The stairway scenes were gorgeous, and Ro, your caps showed the best part of the whole movie, image-wise.

 

I guess I had a little trouble with small things, like why sometimes the shades were up if they were trying to be so gosh darn careful (because they couldn't get that beautiful camera angle if the shades were down, dummy, I hear you saying). Or why they didn't call in another detective to replace our hero when he was spotted by the bad guys, or why he would leave the compartment to look around just when danger was imminent. I must admit that for all the trouble they went to to make you feel the claustrophobia of being stuck on the train, after a while I longed to "get off" the train and stop watching this dang movie.

 

The"twist" was a big surprise.

 

But the thing I loved about the movie and that kept me watching was Marie Windsor. BOY, did I like her! She was great, I wanted her to be the hero, I wanted a movie all about her, because every one of her scenes was interesting - no, not just interesting but FASCINATING.... where can I find more of her? She was wonderful. I loved it every time she tongue lashed poor guilt-ridden, stupid Charles MacGraw, who got two people killed because he just wasn't a very good cop. I'm sorry, I thought he was very possibly the dumbest movie cop I have ever seen, and that includes all the big dumb flatfoots from the thirties right through now. What a maroon! I wanted Marie to start relying on herself for a change, she would have had better luck. I loved her first line in the film, "Getting killed sorta runs in our family...." She was hard as nails and I LIKED it. I want to meet that woman.

 

SPOILERS SPOILERS SPOILERS

 

Whew! Alright, now I got that off my chest, I feel better. Every time I liked someone they would get bumped off. First Brown's partner, who I was looking forward to watching as the story progressed, and then the other large detective (well, he didn't get bumped off but he spent most of the time tied up in the baggage car) and our man didn't even go looking for him!

 

Oh, everyone did their best, acting wise, and I did enjoy Jacqueline White as Ann Sinclair - she is very much the model of Eva Marie Saint in North by Northwest, but I think Jacqueline is sexier than poor bland Eva Marie, even without Eva's racy dialogue.

 

I guess this one was just too "black and white" for me. Maybe it was the hour and a half of listening to Charles MacGraw's frog in the throat that refused to go away.

 

Or maybe I just don't like trains.

 

Message was edited by: JackFavell for spoiler alert

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But is there such a thing as a cheap dame? Actually, I think Quiet

Gal is one.

 

Hey... I'm not CHEAP, but I AM "thrifty" ha. (ok... I am sometimes TOO thrifty...ha) but I am still not CHEAP...ha.

 

Also, not a dame... more like a plain old GAL... ha. (emphasis on the old... Ok.. emphasis on the PLAIN part too, mostly likely..ha) Oh well....

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Hello my little OK Kid....

 

The Narrow Margin was ok. Some of the shots were amazing..... I really enjoyed anything that took place in the dark or the way they used the length of the train to squeeze some suspense out of the story. The stairway scenes were gorgeous, and Ro, your caps showed the best part of the whole movie, image-wise.

 

Thanks, youngun. Glad you got to take this one out for a test drive... it sounds like it was not entirely your cuppa tea...ha. I think for me it goes back to one of the things I mentioned ealier... I can't say that much about most of the acting in this film.. but the CHARACTERS were a lot of fun. And that is probably what I liked about this one more than anything else. That and the creative film techinques.

 

And yes... there was some "duh" stuff going on w/ the storyline.. WHY did he do THIS or why in the WORLD would she do THAT, etc...ha. But overall... I am glad I got to see it... I am sure this one will not make the top of my list (whenever I get to a point where I can make a NOIR FAVE list..ha. But that day is likely a LONG way off... so I am NOT going to sweat it..ha.) For now, I am looking at is a nice start.

 

Or maybe I just don't like trains

 

OH... surely not. I bet it just depends on the TRAIN..ha. I think trains are sometimes a GREAT venue for a mystery/murder/(and perhaps even a "noir") tale. (I am thinking right now of The Lady Vanishes and North by Northwest.) I don't know if those are necessarily 'noirs" or not.. but still really good "train" tales.

 

PS Grey Dude... Still working my way through Scarlet Street... I have not gotten too far due to my busy pace this weekend. Will keep trying to get back to it soon... I gotta see how FAR poor Edward G is going to fall... I KNOW you said he will be ok.. But I am such a "mother hen" I just have to see for myself...ha.

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Hey there, Jacqueline Black -- I guess I had a little trouble with small things, like

why sometimes the shades were up if they were trying to be so gosh darn careful

(because they couldn't get that beautiful camera angle if the shades were down,

dummy, I hear you saying).

 

Too conspicuous! Why be so sneaky if you are trying to tell everyone you're not hiding

anything? Pretend to reply to people so it makes it look like you are taking part in a

discussion. It's all about smoke and mirrors.

 

Or why they didn't call in another detective to replace our hero when he was spotted

by the bad guys,

 

Because you want the bad guys to be onto the detective. He's actually a pawn.

 

or why he would leave the compartment to look around just when danger was

imminent.

 

He felt the danger had moved away from the guilty Marie Windsor and toward the innocent

Jacqueline White. Out of the frying pan, into the fire.

 

I must admit that for all the trouble they went to to make you feel the claustrophobia

of being stuck on the train, after a while I longed to "get off" the train and stop watching

this dang movie.

 

That's interesting. I thought the pacing was very good. I really enjoyed the tension and the

meeting up with the different characters. Lots of gamesmanship. And we were headed to

a showdown; very western.

 

The"twist" was a big surprise.

 

You would think it's obvious, but I didn't see it during my first viewing. I was completely

fooled.

 

My biggest "what the heck" has to do with Marie's character. Why would she play the

record? If the whole point is to be "invisible," then shouldn't you be that? I know she's

playing a disagreeable sort, but she should have known she could only take

it so far. She was the one who screwed up.

 

But the thing I loved about the movie and that kept me watching was Marie

Windsor. BOY, did I like her! She was great, I wanted her to be the hero, I wanted a

movie all about her, because every one of her scenes was interesting - no, not

just interesting but FASCINATING.... where can I find more of her? She was wonderful.

 

:) Most film noir fans really like Marie. She's made for film noir. It's good to see a lass

liking Marie, too.

 

I loved it every time she tongue lashed poor guilt-ridden, stupid Charles MacGraw, who

got two people killed because he just wasn't a very good cop.

 

What?! He was a pawn! They kept him in the dark! And if Marie would have actually

used her head, she wouldn't have... And his partner was too damn sure of himself. He

had become sloppy.

 

I'm sorry, I thought he was very possibly the dumbest movie cop I have ever seen, and

that includes all the big dumb flatfoots from the thirties right through now. What a

maroon! I wanted Marie to start relying on herself for a change, she would have had

better luck.

 

Hey! Chuck is McGruff the Crime Dog! And he ends up saving the day, despite being

misled.

 

I loved her first line in the film, "Getting killed sorta runs in our family...." She was

hard as nails and I LIKED it. I want to meet that woman.

 

She was a phony! An actress!

 

Every time I liked someone they would get bumped off. First Brown's partner, who I was

looking forward to watching as the story progressed,

 

Cocky slop!

 

and then the other large detective (well, he didn't get bumped off but he spent most

of the time tied up in the baggage car) and our man didn't even go looking for him!

 

He's not the guy's babysitter! The fat man messed up, not Chuck!

 

Oh, everyone did their best, acting wise, and I did enjoy Jacqueline White as Ann

Sinclair - she is very much the model of Eva Marie Saint in North by Northwest, but

I think Jacqueline is sexier than poor bland Eva Marie, even without Eva's racy dialogue.

 

I find Eva to be more mysterious and sexier but I liked Jacqueline's "50s" appeal

more. She fits the film noir "good girl" part, and I tend to like those gals the most.

 

I guess this one was just too "black and white" for me.

 

It is rather "black and white" as film noir goes. That's why I figured Quiet Gal would like

it. Watch Scarlet Street if you want some good grey.

 

Maybe it was the hour and a half of listening to Charles MacGraw's frog in the

throat that refused to go away.

 

Poor Chuck.

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*My biggest "what the heck" has to do with Marie's character. Why would she play the*

*record? If the whole point is to be "invisible," then shouldn't you be that? I know she's*

*playing a disagreeable sort, but she should have known she could only take*

*it so far. She was the one who screwed up.*

 

That doesn't seem so implausible, imho, considering what she _really_ was and the fact that as such, she'd have wanted to draw attention away from the lady who should have been the real target all along.

 

Makes sense to me.

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Oh my gosh! He IS *McGruff the Crime Dog* ! Holy smokes! I like McGruff.....

 

I know I was a little ruff (ha) on poor old Chuck..... he did do a good job here.

 

>Because you want the bad guys to be onto the detective. He's actually a pawn.

 

Great point.

 

>She was a phony! An actress!

 

Hey, watch it, mister.....

 

>It is rather "black and white" as film noir goes. That's why I figured Quiet Gal would like it. Watch Scarlet Street if you want some good grey.

 

I think this was my main problem with The Narrow Margin, it seemed a bit simplistic to me. Oh, but the discovery of *Marie Windsor* made it worth the train fare....

 

I am definitely going to check out Scarlet Street.

 

Just as soon as you watch Mr. Lucky. :D

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> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> Absolutely, Mrs. Ryan! Wagon Master it is.

>

> Did you get that, Mr. Grey?

 

He's already upset I'm sure that Wagon Master was even _mentioned_

in his beloved noir universe. (ChiO, too)

 

You can't escape Ford! :P

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