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rohanaka

A Walk on the Noir Side

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I figure the REIGN OF TERROR film is so much of a noir, and looks so much like a noir, the producers, director, and screenwriters must have agreed in advance that this would specifically be a noir-style film about the French Revolution. Sort of an experimental type film.

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What, no Les Vampires (1915) on any of those lists? Watta shame!

 

I've only seen the first episode. I hope to watch some Feuillade in the coming months.

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A-ha Rohanaka

 

A-ha indeed, Miss Maven! :-)

 

Yes, step right up and give forty lashes with a wet noodle to the CineMaven who missed another fine classic

 

Oh no... not THAT! ha. If wet noodles lashes are the penalty for such a thing.. I will be leaving a trail of soggy pasta behind me everywhere I GO, the way things have been going for me these days.. ha. Perish the thought.

 

Hope we both get a chance to check out this film someday.. but golly.. I am so "squeamish" sometimes, ha.. I may have to hide behind the couch for the more intense parts for sure. ha.

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Hiya, Quiet Gal -- that Mann was quite the dark and grim fellow wasn't he?

 

Yes, Mann did like to examine the dark side of man. His westerns often dealt with vengeance and male stubbornness. His films noir were more of an interesting mix of light and dark.

 

I will have to put this one on my radar to try and catch it I ever see it playing... but I do not know if I would actively seek it out. I think I am too big a chicken for that much "intensity" ha. Yet I also know myself well enought to admit if I started watching it.. this would probably be a movie I would not be able to walk away from once it was on ((just based on what I saw here)

 

You would be okay with Reign of Terror. It's basically a political (power) thriller with some good twists. It's mostly a fun ride, albeit a dark one.

 

However I imagine (again..just from those two clips) I would likely be an emotional wreck by the time the movie was over.. ha. But I mean that in a good way. :-)

 

It's not a huge emotional film, at least in terms of matters of the heart. I rarely ever think of Mann's films as being on the emotional (heart-wise) side. He tends to run on the cold side. Side Street has some heart, as does Raw Deal. Mann's primary emotion tends to be anger. :D

 

Oh.. and PS: I hope to get back w/ you on They Live By Night in the next day or so

 

Now that's a film with a lot of emotion.

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Now that's a film with a lot of emotion

 

OH sure Grey Guy.. make me watch a movie that causes me to bust out bawlin' now just thinking about it. :-)

 

Poor kids.. they were DOOMED from the very beginning, weren't they? What a sorry hand life dealt to the both of them. Their biggest "crime" was they both were just born into the wrong families and so that is what caused them to more or less get stuck living an entire life of "in the wrong place at the wrong time"

 

Very tragic. Sure, they made some mistakes, but truly I found them BOTH to be quite sympathetic.

 

PS: you were right.. it does have a lot of emotion... especiallly at the end..sniff, sniff. sob. (Oh good gravy... just thinking of it...ha.. pass the kleenex, please).

 

Minispoiler wannabe:

 

And PS some more: You know what would have made a GREAT ending?? If he was still hanging on when she got to him... and then he looks at her right at the very end and asks, "What time is it?" Gasp.. just thinking of the way he said it to her in those other scenes... Oh brother.. HURRY up w/ the Kleenex will you, already! For crying out loud!. ha.

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hi ro,

i cried at the end of *they lived by night* too, especially with the watch thing.

talk about a stacked deck against them. they didn't have a chance. but they

did try. i give them so much credit for trying to be happy and get a piece of

the "normal" life so many take for granted, and did so without any desire to

hurt anyone else.

 

nicholas ray really goes for the heart and guts in his movies.

 

but oh, that howard da silva character....gaaaack! he gives me nightmares.

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i give them so much credit for trying to be happy and get a piece of

the "normal" life so many take for granted, and did so without any desire to

hurt anyone else.

 

When he pushed that jewlery store clerk out of the way (for his own good) that told me EVERYTHING I needed to know about his real character. He did NOT have any interest in getting ahead by hurting others (as his cohorts clearly did) I think he was just trapped in a really "impossible" situation. I like how he REALLY tried to get out too.. but still had a level of "compassion" for the men who at one time must have been the only "friends" he had.. though admitttedly they WERE some pretty lousy friends to be stuck with.

 

nicholas ray really goes for the heart and guts in his movies

 

I really don't know anything about him as a director.. but I have to say THIS story was all of that. "Heart and Guts" are right It was as the Grey Guy says.. very "emotional" And the two characters were filled w/ "heart and guts" too.. They had REAL "hearts" that truly did want to do good and find a way to just be happy and love one another without as you say.. huriting anyone.. but it took a LOT of "guts" for them to live the life they were dealt.. It had to be a hard way to grow up.. and in many ways they only JUST were really starting to find out what REAL happiness was all about. They really did have a lot of inner strength that only just was starting to work for them when things went bad.. I say again.. very tragic.

 

that howard da silva character....gaaaack! he gives me nightmares

 

OH my gosh my golly.. what a bad, bad, BAD man.. and TOTALLY creepy.. inside and out. (ugh)

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>

> When he pushed that jewlery store clerk out of the way (for his own good) that told me EVERYTHING I needed to know about his real character. He did NOT have any interest in getting ahead by hurting others (as his cohorts clearly did) I think he was just trapped in a really "impossible" situation. I like how he REALLY tried to get out too.. but still had a level of "compassion" for the men who at one time must have been the only "friends" he had.. though admitttedly they WERE some pretty lousy friends to be stuck with.

>

 

that someone so young and who'd basically spent most of his "adult" years in jail

should even have ANY sense of loyalty (even to fellow cons) is remarkable in itself.

and goes to show you he had good stuff in him that environment had neither contributed

toward, nor stamped out of him. he was just a good kid born in the wrong circumstances.

the girl, too.

 

> nicholas ray really goes for the heart and guts in his movies

>

> I really don't know anything about him as a director.. but I have to say THIS story was all of that. "Heart and Guts" are right It was as the Grey Guy says.. very "emotional"

 

with a couple of exceptions (johnny guitar, for instance) i've been very

entrhalled by the emotions in his films. he can take really "harsh" subject

matter (police brutality, child murder, teen crime, war..) and find the humanity

and heart in even the people considered the "dregs" by society. look how

we all went back and forth over "dixon steele" and "laurel grey". i believe

you said you have not seen my favorite nick ray film, *on dangerous ground*

yet. that is probably not going to be as emotional for you as *they live by night*

is, since it's tougher to feel sympathy for Robert Ryan's "Jim Wilson" than for

a couple of sweet eyed kids, but it's another GREAT example of how Ray

will find the good in someone who seems utterly lost to any kind of redemption.

it's one of my all time favoriite movies.

 

 

> And the two characters were filled w/ "heart and guts" too.. They had REAL "hearts" that truly did want to do good and find a way to just be happy and love one another without as you say.. huriting anyone.. but it took a LOT of "guts" for them to live the life they were dealt.. It had to be a hard way to grow up.. and in many ways they only JUST were really starting to find out what REAL happiness was all about. They really did have a lot of inner strength that only just was starting to work for them when things went bad.. I say again.. very tragic.

>

 

you are right...they could have tried to just use every expedient to make their life

easier...to keep on robbing to live better, flashier, but they resisted this and kept

quiet and to themselves, just trying to live like a normal, young couple starting out.

i found that sweet. in fact, my favorite scene in the movie is the fireplace scene

where they are just laying in front of the fire, talking and making plans. it's a lovely,

tender scene of newlyweds. you could take it and place it in a whole different,

Light heareted romance" movie and it would fit....only it's here, in this harsh

noir reality....

 

 

 

> that howard da silva character....gaaaack! he gives me nightmares

>

> OH my gosh my golly.. what a bad, bad, BAD man.. and TOTALLY creepy.. inside and out. (ugh)

 

i tell you i had to look away whenever Ray gave him a close up. and it's not because

of his affliction, but because of his inner venality and meanness that just made him

so repulsive.

 

i thought another interesting character was the woman who owned the motor court,

the one who's husband the 'gang' were trying to spring. she represented what the

girl could become if she wasn't made of better stuff. talk about bitter. yet you could

tell she almost envied the younger girl her naivitee and that she was starting out with

the kind of hopes she probably had. yet, sad to say, in a way the woman was right,

she knew it was no good being with a con in the end. i hate that.

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They Live by SPOILAGE: (ha)

 

that someone so young and who'd basically spent most of his "adult" years in jail

should even have ANY sense of loyalty (even to fellow cons) is remarkable in itself

 

I imagine (and this is a TOTAL "presumption" on my part) it must have been a VERY scary world to be cast into and he was happy to have made some "bigger and stronger" friends. But again.. with friends like that... he might have done better to have just taken his chances.

 

I do think "T-Dub" (I think that was his name) was a bit less "mean spirited" than deSilva's character. He seemed to understand (and maybe even sympathize a bit) when he told them he was not going to be working with them anymore. But still.. he let his own selfish plans take precedent over anything else, so his "sympathy" only went so far.

 

look how we all went back and forth over "dixon steele" and "laurel grey

 

Well now see.. I did not even know that it was the same guy making both movies. (DUH!) :-) really have only just started noticing his name, I guess. I need to look at his "filmography" and find out how many of his films I actually have seen.

 

you are right...they could have tried to just use every expedient to make their life

easier...to keep on robbing to live better, flashier, but they resisted this and kept

quiet and to themselves, just trying to live like a normal, young couple starting out

 

The QT started watching this with me (but fell asleep before it was over) Anyway.. when it first came on, he had never heard about it before and when I told him what little I knew about it (from what had been said here) he asked, "Oh boy.. this isn't going to be a low-budget "Bonnie and Clyde" is it?) ha. (I hate that movie by the way, ha. So I am GLAD he was wrong about THAT!!) But you know.. it COULD have gone that way. (sort of along the lines of Gun Crazy even) if those two had been more in "LOVE" with the lifestyle and mindsets they had been raised in (rather than repelled by them) I really like that this time.. they were NOT looking for the "high life" but just wanted to find whatever happiness they could. That was a nice "twist" for a "cops and robbers" type story.

 

i tell you i had to look away whenever Ray gave him a close up. and it's not because

of his affliction, but because of his inner venality and meanness that just made him

so repulsive.

 

I gotta confess.. ha.. it was BOTH for me. UGH.. he was definitely one guy whose "INNER" ugly was just as apparent on the outside as well. He was loud and TOTALLY "mocking" in his attitude toward anything that might be "good" or "pleasant". Talk about a hate-filled, hateful, totally UNsympathetic guy... You said it earlier.. "gaaaack!" is the right word, ha.

 

thought another interesting character was the woman who owned the motor court,

the one who's husband the 'gang' were trying to spring. she represented what the

girl could become if she wasn't made of better stuff. talk about bitter

 

I did not have much sympathy for her.. until right up to the end when you could TELL her conscience really DID work afterall. At first I found her to be truly just a mean and (as you say) bitter woman. But as she really began to contemplate on the trade she was making.. her husband's life.. for someone else's husband, I think it finally "sunk" in and she hated herself for it. But not enough to change her mind.. not enough.

 

OH boy did I keep hoping and hoping she'd call him back into that room with her as he was leaving... sniff.. (Oh WHERE is Frank Grimes with my box of KLEENEX already??) :D

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*Well now see.. I did not even know that it was the same guy making both movies. (DUH!) :-) really have only just started noticing his name, I guess. I need to look at his "filmography" and find out how many of his films I actually have seen.*

 

Every Nicholas Ray movie is worth seeing, but I'd put the following into the "must-see" category:

 

*They Live by Night* (1948)

*Knock on Any Door* (1949)

*In a Lonely Place* (1950)

*On Dangerous Ground* (1952)

*The Lusty Men* (1952)

*Johnny Guitar* (1954)

*Rebel Without a Cause* (1955)

*Bigger Than Life* (1956)

*Party Girl* (1958)

 

Then there's *We Can't Go Home Again* (1973-76), a fascinating experimental film and quasi-documentary made with students when he was teaching college, and *Lightning Over Water* (1981), a documentary on his death, co-directed with Wim Wenders, and one of the most painfully emotional films I've ever seen.

 

A real glutton for Ray? I Was Interrupted: Nicholas Ray on Making Movies, an "autobiography" compiled from his writings and edited by his last wife, Susan Ray.

 

He's one of a kind.

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Thanks for the info on Ray, Mr. ChiO, sir.

 

I appreciate the listing you gave of some of the titles for him. I am only familiar with just a couple of them so I will have to look up the rest and see about giving some of them a try.

 

I am finding that the longer I hang out here, the more I learn... and I am having a lot of fun finding new (old) films (not to mention directors and actors too) to enjoy along the way.

 

Thanks again.

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What's the word, Quiet Gal -- OH sure Grey Guy.. make me watch a movie that causes me to bust out bawlin' now just thinking about it. :-)

 

My goodness! You are on a serious roll! And you're watching my kind of films! I'm worried about you. On second thought, I'm worried about me. There has to be a double-cross a coming.

 

Poor kids.. they were DOOMED from the very beginning, weren't they? What a sorry hand life dealt to the both of them. Their biggest "crime" was they both were just born into the wrong families and so that is what caused them to more or less get stuck living an entire life of "in the wrong place at the wrong time"

 

You know, I didn't pick this up until this viewing, my third viewing. You got it on the first one! Nicely done! You're right, both Bowie (Farley Granger) and Keechie (Cathy O'Donnell) speak of their mothers. You get the feeling that was a huge factor in their own instability. I found that to be fascinating.

 

theylivebynight1.jpg

 

theylivebynight2.jpg

 

theylivebynight3.jpg

 

Very tragic. Sure, they made some mistakes, but truly I found them BOTH to be quite sympathetic.

 

And this is film noir. How in the world do we ever come to feel sympathy for an escaped murderer who robs a bank while on the lam?

 

PS: you were right.. it does have a lot of emotion... especiallly at the end..sniff, sniff. sob. (Oh good gravy... just thinking of it...ha.. pass the kleenex, please).

 

I absolutely love the ending and also the scene where Keechie is in bed. I love these lines:

 

theylivebynight5.jpg

 

theylivebynight6.jpg

 

theylivebynight7.jpg

 

theylivebynight8.jpg

 

theylivebynight4.jpg

 

And PS some more: You know what would have made a GREAT ending?? If he was still hanging on when she got to him... and then he looks at her right at the very end and asks, "What time is it?"

 

Hey! I like that! That would have been terrific. I really liked the entire watch connection between the two.

 

theylivebynight9.jpg

 

theylivebynight10.jpg

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Where's the score, Miss Gun for Hire -- i believe you said you have not seen my favorite nick ray film, on dangerous ground yet. that is probably not going to be as emotional for you as they live by night is, since it's tougher to feel sympathy for Robert Ryan's "Jim Wilson" than for a couple of sweet eyed kids, but it's another GREAT example of how Ray will find the good in someone who seems utterly lost to any kind of redemption. it's one of my all time favoriite movies.

 

I think Quiet Gal would absolutely love On Dangerous Ground. I think she'd really go for the entire story, the characters, the look, the music, the emotion. The film pretty much has it all.

 

my favorite scene in the movie is the fireplace scene where they are just laying in front of the fire, talking and making plans. it's a lovely, tender scene of newlyweds. you could take it and place it in a whole different, Light heareted romance" movie and it would fit....only it's here, in this harsh

noir reality....

 

That was really good. :)

 

theylivebynight11.jpg

 

i thought another interesting character was the woman who owned the motor court,

the one who's husband the 'gang' were trying to spring. she represented what the

girl could become if she wasn't made of better stuff. talk about bitter. yet you could

tell she almost envied the younger girl her naivitee and that she was starting out with

the kind of hopes she probably had. yet, sad to say, in a way the woman was right,

she knew it was no good being with a con in the end. i hate that.

 

That was superb.

 

I thought Mattie (Helen Craig) was the most tragic figure in the film. She's lost without her man. She's alone and hurting. She only hates Bowie and Keechie because they are in love and have each other. It's what she wants. She's extremely envious. She wishes her husband would tell her the words Bowie writes to Keechie. You get the feeling that her love is mostly one-sided. And she does regret what she does, but not enough to not do it. She has to stick a knife in Bowie's back to get what she selfishly wants and needs. No honor among some of these thieves.

 

theylivebynight17.jpg

 

theylivebynight12.jpg

 

theylivebynight13.jpg

 

theylivebynight14.jpg

 

theylivebynight15.jpg

 

theylivebynight16.jpg

 

And I believe Mattie is playing solitaire when Bowie shows up.

 

theylivebynight19.jpg

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> I think Quiet Gal would absolutely love On Dangerous Ground. I think she'd really go for the entire story, the characters, the look, the music, the emotion. The film pretty much has it all.

>

 

I hope so, I just don't know how she'll feel about Jim. He's hard to take through most

of the movie.

 

>

> I thought Mattie (Helen Craig) was the most tragic figure in the film. She's lost without her man. She's alone and hurting. She only hates Bowie and Keechie because they are in love and have each other. It's what she wants. She's extremely envious. She wishes her husband would tell her the words Bowie writes to Keechie. You get the feeling that her love is mostly one-sided. And she does regret what she does, but not enough to not do it. She has to stick a knife in Bowie's back to get what she selfishly wants and needs. No honor among some of these thieves.

>

 

Great caps...I didn't catch that she was playing solitaire. I doubt Laurence Harvey

was going to show up, either. :D

 

Poor Mattie. I did feel her pain. And her envy. Yet she's still a young, striking

woman. And with a motor court, yet. Just ring up Prowler-1-1-9 and ask for Webb, honey.

 

I do believe her love was one-sided and that she wished her man cared

about her like Bowie did Keechie (all this time I thought it was Geechie).

Hers is an interesting character, and very realistic. The world is full of Matties now.

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I just don't know how she'll feel about Jim. He's hard to take through most of the movie.

 

She'll end up really liking him.

 

Great caps...I didn't catch that she was playing solitaire. I doubt Laurence Harvey

was going to show up, either. :D

 

:)

 

Poor Mattie. I did feel her pain. And her envy. Yet she's still a young, striking

woman. And with a motor court, yet. Just ring up Prowler-1-1-9 and ask for Webb, honey.

 

So that's what you do! I figured as much! You and your prowlers!

 

I do believe her love was one-sided and that she wished her man cared about her like Bowie did Keechie (all this time I thought it was Geechie). Hers is an interesting character, and very realistic. The world is full of Matties now.

 

You're right, I do believe the world is full of "Matties." Lots of envy and bitterness. And I had been calling Keechie, "Geechie." My fault. The subtitles do use "Geechie" a couple times, but the characters are clearly calling her "Keechie." And her name is Catherine.

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> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> I just don't know how she'll feel about Jim. He's hard to take through most of the movie.

>

> She'll end up really liking him.

>

 

hmmm....i hope so.

 

> So that's what you do! I figured as much! You and your prowlers!

>

 

how did i get into this? i was just offering her a solution.

 

> You're right, I do believe the world is full of "Matties." Lots of envy and bitterness. And I had been calling Keechie, "Geechie." My fault. The subtitles do use "Geechie" a couple times, but the characters are clearly calling her "Keechie." And her name is Catherine.

 

but i thought it sounded like they were calling her Geechie, too. strange name, I don't

like it.

 

so what did you make of howard da silva's character?

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how did i get into this? i was just offering her a solution.

 

If you're offering her a solution, you must think it's a good one, Miss Skillet!

 

but i thought it sounded like they were calling her Geechie, too. strange name, I don't

like it.

 

You don't like it because it isn't feminine! It is a strange name, though. You get the feeling she's only around guys.

 

so what did you make of howard da silva's character?

 

Crude and cruel. I liked how Ray had the two sets of brothers being involved. You see how Chickamaw (Howard Da Silva) treated his alcoholic brother (Will Wright) and then you see how T-Dub (Jay C. Flippen) treats his brother, Robert (Frank Marlowe). He's using his money to help Mattie get him paroled.

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> You don't like it because it isn't feminine! It is a strange name, though.

>

 

It just sounds so unattractive for a sweet girl.

 

> so what did you make of howard da silva's character?

>

> Crude and cruel. I liked how Ray had the two sets of brothers being involved. You see how Chickamaw (Howard Da Silva) treated his alcoholic brother (Will Wright) and then you see how T-Dub (Jay C. Flippen) treats his brother, Robert (Frank Marlowe). He's using his money to help Mattie get him paroled.

 

goodness, that was a good catch. I didn't notice that there were two sets of brothers. that adds a lot to the movie for me. it pins down "Chickamaw" (these names!) a little more for me. I did kind of like "T-Dub", he wasn't all bad. He was like Mattie, in a way. Again, it's Ray's ability to show the human in the roughest of characters. Well, I don't know about Chickamaw, though.

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It just sounds so unattractive for a sweet girl.

 

It's "country" for "sweetie." :P

 

goodness, that was a good catch. I didn't notice that there were two sets of brothers. that adds a lot to the movie for me.

 

It really does. I actually didn't catch that in my first two viewings. My focus was mostly on Bowie and Keechie.

 

it pins down "Chickamaw" (these names!) a little more for me.

 

He was a user.

 

I did kind of like "T-Dub", he wasn't all bad. He was like Mattie, in a way.

 

I definitely liked T-Dub. He did have a heart.

 

Again, it's Ray's ability to show the human in the roughest of characters.

 

I completely agree. You've got two hardened criminals yet they are different. Ray is very good at providing great depth and texture with his characters.

 

I thought it was tough hearing that Keechie didn't like her dad.

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> It's "country" for "sweetie." :P

>

 

ha! and i have to admit i prefer "Keechie" to "sweetie", a term

i've heard used in such a phony way too many times.

 

> I definitely liked T-Dub. He did have a heart.

>

 

it adds to that conviction that Ray cast Jay C. Flippen, who

always brings a sense of inward decency.

 

> Again, it's Ray's ability to show the human in the roughest of characters.

>

> I completely agree. You've got two hardened criminals yet they are different. Ray is very good at providing great depth and texture with his characters.

>

 

you get the feeling he really felt for the "outsider" but he didn't "glorify" them.

he showed their pain.

 

 

> I thought it was tough hearing that Keechie didn't like her dad.

 

that was will wright who was her old man, or am I mistaken?

if it was, i didn't like him any better than she did. talk about a user! and why

is will wright always the one playing those miserable old guys? :D it

was funny seeing him and Da Silva together after *The Blue Dahlia*.

Quite a switch for Da Silva but the same, slimy road for the old man.

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ha! and i have to admit i prefer "Keechie" to "sweetie", a term i've heard used in such a phony way too many times.

 

Ohhhh, sweetie.

 

it adds to that conviction that Ray cast Jay C. Flippen, who always brings a sense of inward decency.

 

That's a very good point. He's a really strong character actor. He has that "worn" look.

 

you get the feeling he really felt for the "outsider" but he didn't "glorify" them. he showed their pain.

 

Ray was definitely drawn to the outsider. You'll find lonely characters in Ray's films, with many of them close to finding love and some sort of acceptance. Sometimes it's found, many times it's lost.

 

that was will wright who was her old man, or am I mistaken? if it was, i didn't like him any better than she did. talk about a user!

 

But he had a problem. He wasn't mean or cruel, he was just a drunk. He was weak. He's the character who is the weakest in the film. I felt for the guy.

 

and why is will wright always the one playing those miserable old guys? :D

 

He's really good!

 

it was funny seeing him and Da Silva together after The Blue Dahlia. Quite a switch for Da Silva but the same, slimy road for the old man.

 

:D He was a serious weasel in The Blue Dahlia. Wright and Da Silva are excellent in that film. Lots of great performances in that film, actually. William Bendix was the best.

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>

> Ray was definitely drawn to the outsider. You'll find lonely characters in Ray's films, with many of them close to finding love and some sort of acceptance. Sometimes it's found, many times it's lost.

>

 

yes...Dixon Steele.

 

> But he had a problem. He wasn't mean or cruel, he was just a drunk. He was weak. He's the character who is the weakest in the film. I felt for the guy.

>

 

yes, i suppose, but those people can sometimes do more damage than vicious ones.

 

> :D He was a serious weasel in The Blue Dahlia. Wright and Da Silva are excellent in that film. Lots of great performances in that film, actually. William Bendix was the best.

 

i agree, that's why it's my favorite of the Ladd/Lake films.

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yes...Dixon Steele.

 

Jim Wilson to Dixon Steele.

 

yes, i suppose, but those people can sometimes do more damage than vicious ones.

 

Definitely. But they can also hurt more.

 

i agree, that's why it's my favorite of the Ladd/Lake films.

 

I like This Gun for a Hire a little more. It's harder hitting and with greater emotion. But The Blue Dahlia has a greater cast and performances. Veronica Lake's character is more interesting, too.

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> yes, i suppose, but those people can sometimes do more damage than vicious ones.

>

> Definitely. But they can also hurt more.

>

 

i know, and they tell you and tell you about it...about their hurt, not yours.

 

> i agree, that's why it's my favorite of the Ladd/Lake films.

>

> I like This Gun for a Hire a little more. It's harder hitting and with greater emotion. But The Blue Dahlia has a greater cast and performances. Veronica Lake's character is more interesting, too.

 

i'd be hard pressed to say which is the better film...i'm a softie so i like *the blue dahlia* more because it has a little romance...also, i'm a big fan of Raymond Chandler dialogue.

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