Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
rohanaka

A Walk on the Noir Side

Recommended Posts

I liked the second half of the film better too. There are stretches in credibility in many films so some of that wasn't a big bother but it was noticeable for me.

 

*SPOILER*

 

The whole theater scene bothered me most. The basis for doing it, the way Keyes acted it (even for a stage play it seemed way too much) and most of all at the producer swearing out a warrant for something that he helped create a reaction on. (I would have loved for something to happen to them.) I do think it was a good example of unintended consequences. A joke. How much harm could there be? Ruining a friendship, jail time for some one and embarrassing someone who means something to you. How incredibly selfish.

 

She had to make it up to him. If she doesn't try, with the other things going on, we lose out faith in everyone, save for Frank Faylen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that was worth waiting for, Mr. Mad Hat! Excellent review of *99 River Street* and in fact, you made me understand better what i liked and what suprised me about it. After reading what you and others have said about Keyes' kooky character, I appreciate her more.

 

And as for Payne's Driscoll, you know who he suddenly reminds me of? Anyone here

ever see L.A. Confidential? He is like Russell Crowe's quick tempered cop who, at

first only knows how to react with his fists, just like Ernie. These guys know only one way

to deal with a problem: "When you get hit, hit back...harder." or words to that effect keep

going around in Ernie's mind. Yet without Evelyn there and his cabbie friend, I'm not sure

he'd have made it through this because brains was needed as well as brawn. Dexter's Rawlins

was no idiot, in fact I believed in his brains more than his brawn. He was about fooling and tricks

and outsmarting the wise guys...dangerous. Rawlins' mistake was letting himself get even one

second in Ernie's clutches. So long as Ernie couldn't connect Rawlins was safe but he was a dead

man once Ernie was able to work him over. It was like he turned super human, after being shot

in what I thought was a fatal wound, he keeps going after Rawlins (again, this was used in

L.A. Confidential with Crowe's character pushing on and on after getting shot repeatedly).

 

I agree that Evelyn's character was SUPER "pushy"---great adjective. This makes her

interesting to watch once you just accept she's not a "regular girl". She's just as Jackie

said, a car wreck and you are fascinated because she just seems to be begging for someone

to knock her out (first she toys with a volatile ex-boxer, making a complete fool of him in

a manner that really had me feeling for the poor guy....oh! And my poor Glen Langan, there

he was playing a foolish and slightly fey Broadway boob..yuck!! I WANTED Ernie to start

mopping the floor with them) and then she Salome's a guy who would snap her neck like

a celery stalk. I guess she really is perfect for Ernie because she obviously likes to live

dangerously and when she tells Rawlins she likes 'to play rough" she wasn't kidding.

 

Pauline was a little like that, too. I was also confused by her poor judgement in that

little meeting with the "fence" or whatever that guy was, the one who was to buy the

hot diamonds. Like you say, Mad Hat, there's a time and a place to nag your boyfriend.

 

I just wish I'd recorded *99 River Street* along with *Kansas City*, because they were the two best films of the night yet I ended up only recording the latter two movies (Crooked Way and Shores of Tripoli).

 

Great ramble!

 

P.S. Chris, you cracked me up with "I liked Evelyn's hair more than Evelyn". :D:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> *SPOILER*

>

> The whole theater scene bothered me most. The basis for doing it, the way Keyes acted it (even for a stage play it seemed way too much) and most of all at the producer swearing out a warrant for something that he helped create a reaction on. (I would have loved for something to happen to them.) I do think it was a good example of unintended consequences. A joke. How much harm could there be? Ruining a friendship, jail time for some one and embarrassing someone who means something to you. How incredibly selfish.

>

 

I totally agree, Chris! This was the part I had the biggest issue with. I was hating it as it happened, and when I found out it was all a charade I really flipped. I was like Ernie...staring dumbfounded and ready to strangle someone. Especially Glen Langan and Evelyn. They both were a little too dumb about it for too long. "Somebody give the guy 20 bucks"...ooooooooooohhhhh.

 

It was in fact Evelyn's switch from being the kind of dame who would do this to a guy who was trying to help her, into a sort of "Bonnie" to his "Clyde", ready to run off on the lamb or seduce the murderer of his wife for him. But I guess making her a kooky actress is supposed to get us ready to believe this girl will do ANYTHING.

 

 

> She had to make it up to him. If she doesn't try, with the other things going on, we lose out faith in everyone, save for Frank Faylen.

 

At the end, she also seems poised to making Ernie into the next Gas Station King, using her pushiness to make all his cronnies go to their new business for filler-ups.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>And as for Payne's Driscoll, you know who he suddenly reminds me of? Anyone here

ever see L.A. Confidential? He is like Russell Crowe's quick tempered cop who, at

first only knows how to react with his fists, just like Ernie. These guys know only one way

to deal with a problem: "When you get hit, hit back...harder."

 

Oh my gosh, did you ever get this right! I don't know how you pulled that one out of your hat. He IS just like Russell Crowe's character! All the brutality, but then the confusion, too, and then he keeps coming on like a kid who doesn't know when he's beaten. Perfect!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So $20 is supposed to soothe some guy's feelings. I'm surprised he didn't walk over and punch out the producer for suggesting it. Being insulted after being insulted can be too much for some people.

 

In a real life sense it would be hard to imagine that many people thinking that whole deal was a good idea.

 

(Glad I made you laugh.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Ernie's case, there's also mixed in this desperate need to prove he can win just one more big fight...so maybe he not only wanted revenge on Rawlins, but saw him as the "opponent" he needed to knock out to prove he was back on top. Because the last scene is a mirror shot of when Ernie ends up on the ropes...remember? Darn, I wish I'd recorded it so I could post a screen cap comparison.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would agree with most of your thought except I think Ernie's biggest problem is himself. (He is afraid, I think, that he becomes the loser that Pauline thinks he is.) He only knows how to do one thing - box. He is ready to give up his health for a fight. I don't even think it is all about the money. I do think Rawlins becomes a substitute for that fight. The fact that he wins helps him get his self esteem back, and Linda (Evelyn.)

 

I do remember the shots you refer to. I think that was as much flashback for him as us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You said it better than I did, Chris. He has to prove himself.

 

Oh, and you guys mentioned the "sexiness" of some of the scenes and dialogue...I've come to expect this from Phil Karlsen. His movies all seem to kind of push that envelope.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tight Spot, 5 Against the House, Phenix City Story and the super cheesy *The Young Doctors*. :D He directed some westerns, too, though I can't really recollect them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah. I've seen a few. Nothing really distinguishing though after your list. A few "Matt Helm" films and an Elvis movie and "Gunman's Walk" (which I have seen.) "Walking Tall" and "Ben" were hits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*RIVER SPOILER*

 

 

*Rawlins' mistake was letting himself get even one*

*second in Ernie's clutches. So long as Ernie couldn't connect Rawlins was safe but he was a dead*

*man once Ernie was able to work him over. It was like he turned super human, after being shot*

*in what I thought was a fatal wound, he keeps going after Rawlins (again, this was used in*

*L.A. Confidential with Crowe's character pushing on and on after getting shot repeatedly).*

 

I think you are definitely right about that. Also I confess, I haven't seen *L.A. Confidential* so I can't really compare but I thought Ernie's wound might have been deadly as well and he was taking every last bit of his life energy to get Rawlins.

 

It seems like we all hated the theater scene too.

 

*Tight Spot, 5 Against the House, Phenix City Story and the super cheesy The Young Doctors. :D He directed some westerns, too, though I can't really recollect them.*

 

I remember discussing *Tight Spot* a long time ago, either here or at SSO, and people hated Ginger Rogers's hair in that one too. :)

 

Edited by: molo14 on Jan 18, 2011 11:35 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=molo14 wrote:}{quote}

>

> Also I think I will check out *Unfaithfully Yours* again and see if I like it better than the last time.

 

 

Please disregard this. I'm afraid ol' Molo is slowly losing his mind. :) For some reason I keep getting *Unfaithfully Yours* confused with another movie! Every time somebody mentions it this happens. For the record, I have never seen *Unfaithfully Yours* though I do know about it and hope to see it soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you by chance confusing it with the Lubitsch movie with Merle Oberon? Because I always do!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No it's not that one. For some reason every time someone mentions *Unfaithfully Yours* my brain short circuits to *Without Reservations* !!! What the connection is I have no idea! Colbert worked with Sturges?? I don't know. Yours actually makes more sense. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awwwwww darn it Bronxie...I'm just wandering over here and I see you WERE talking about Peggie Castle. (I still can't see the picture). She was a ****. If only I possessed one-tenth of that. Thanx again for thinking of me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

99 RIVER STREET IS FLOODED WITH SPOILAGE

 

Hola, Pauline -- As for 99 River Street, I confess I had a hard time choosing between

adorable John Payne and Brad Dexter, whose baby blues always have me mesmerized. And something about a smiling villain...he was like a Cobra, you get locked by his gaze and smile and then whooosh! He strikes!

 

We know which guy you chose, Pauline! Typical!

 

I confess I was worried for Evelyn Keyes in that diner. I thought any second now he's

going to smack her or shoot her! The more he smiled, the more worried I felt.

 

:) Ssssssssssss!

 

I am less thrilled with Keyes this time around, at least I was until the last scenes. I thought she was corny in the theater until I realized she was putting on an "act". Then I was skeptical that after being so desperate to make it on Broadway she could drop it so quickly to get mixed up with a guy suspected of murdering his wife. :0

 

She was in his corner!

 

Now that reflect back on it, Evelyn played her just kooky enough that she would switch on you like that.

 

:D You're kooky!

 

And after hearing Robert Osborne's remarks about how charismatic she was in person, I now want to read her autobiography.

 

Yeah, yeah, yeah. You just want to read about all the guys she was with.

 

Hey there, MusicMan -- I spent the evening with John Payne and "99 River Street." My first thought was I liked Evelyn's hair more than I did her. I thought she was too much too often.

 

I can't disagree with that. I liked her a lot at first, but then she started to wear on me.

 

Once again, for me, Payne was really good. Tough but still likable he carries the film. He is older and looks a little weathered while still being in good enough shape to carry off the boxer character though he may a be a bit old.

 

I really liked him, too. I thought he was the picture of a mug fighter. His build and demeanor fit perfectly. He was terrific.

 

One thing that struck me is how sexual parts of the film are. We get a couple of cheesecake shots of Peggy Castle fixing her stockings and getting something off of a shelf. There are also several times when for her and Evelyn there are shots where there chest is prominent in the foreground of the shot with Payne as someone else is the focal point of the shot.

 

Ohhhhhhhhhhhhh, Peggie Castle. Ahhhhhhhhhh... She was quite lovely and very believable as Miss Goddess. :P

 

Later when Evelyn goes to the bar in Jersey I'd like to think that just because a woman hiked her skirt a little, pulls back her coat and sticks out her chest that some guy wouldn't just lose all reason.

 

Goodbye reason!

 

Luckily "Rollins," after some more blatant flirtation he refuses more than once.

 

He would have been all over her if he didn't have to flee.

 

The whole theater scene bothered me most. The basis for doing it, the way Keyes acted it (even for a stage play it seemed way too much) and most of all at the producer swearing out a warrant for something that he helped create a reaction on. (I would have loved for something to happen to them.) I do think it was a good example of unintended consequences. A joke. How much harm could there be? Ruining a friendship, jail time for some one and embarrassing someone who means something to you. How incredibly selfish.

 

The theater scene helps to promote the theme of the film. Is it all an act or is it real? Are you in a person's corner or not? Ernie pours out his heart in that scene. He's real. All of the others are just phonies. They are faking it. Even Linda gets caught up in this world. "Hey, let's use his lines!" I loved Ernie's line of "dying an inch at a time." Heart-wrenching. I also liked how Linda speaks of her wanting to kill. That it was no longer self-defense, but a desire. That plays into Ernie's feelings at the time.

 

Linda eventually decides that Ernie means more to her than a theater job. Even though he's a married man, she views him as more than a friend.

 

What's the word, Grahame's Guy -- So that's my take on 99 River Street

 

And what a fantastic take it is! Nicely done.

 

I didn't know what to make of Payne's Ernie Driscoll for a while there. I mean the poor guy had to put up with Pauline's (Peggy Castle) put downs, she was real piece of work, but in noir you got to expect these things. He seemed to really long for something. Was is to earn Pauline's love and respect? Recapture whatever magic was there? I'm not sure, he seems to both hold her in contempt for her materialism but, rather naively, hope of winning her over with flowers. He was willing to make a go of it with the cab. He wanted kids, a son like Junior, and he almost let himself believe it was possible.

 

I believe Ernie (John Payne) wanted Pauline's (Peggie Castle) love above all else. It hurt him to watch the replay of his title fight of four years ago, but Pauline's punches about his being a horrible failure to her crushed him the most.

 

He was brooding. A defeated boxer, forced out by injury. He also had an unnerving habit of lashing out in anger at the wrong targets. I wasn't sure where all of this was going.

 

I loved that about Ernie. He was wearing his frustration.

 

How exactly did Linda expect him to react? She must have known he was volatile, or was she just so completely focused on herself that she didn't care? Again Linda is pushy, dangerously pushy.

 

I don't think she ever saw that side of Ernie. And, you're right, I believe she was completely focused on herself. She's to be the counter to Pauline. Pauline is only focusing on her, so Linda is to come from the other side of woman (humans). Ernie rants about women at the end of the film and Linda quickly shoots him down. Rightly so. But she was guilty for that one moment.

 

Back to Pauline, I was strangely fascinated. Now this was a noir dame. She seemed almost sadistic in pressing poor Ernie's buttons, but then, when caught in the act, she tells Rawlins (Brad Dexter) you don't know what he's like, he'll kill me. She talks of how he broods, lets it build up, and then strikes. It's like she's been down this road before. Yet she takes big chances. She knows it's time to get the heck out of Dodge too.

 

Excellent description. I was mesmerized by Pauline. I liked her reaction when she saw the cab driver was Ernie. That was terrific.

 

In the first botched jewel exchange, she squirms around. Did she not want to be there, or did she know that they didn't want her there? Either way she goes off on Rawlins about the murder. She didn't play that very cool, I mean there is the proper time to go off about being involved in murder and that wasn't the time for it. In the end all her fear makes her a big liability. She didn't help her case in that regard.

 

Ahhhhhh, Pauline. She only thinks of herself. And if she's bothered by something, she's going to let you know about it, right at that moment. She's mouth more than brain. Ahhhhhhh, Pauline.

 

So with Pauline's exit and Driscoll and Linda finding her in the cab the movie really starts rolling. This was the big pay off. Now it gets really interesting as the chase is on. This is what put the movie into the "very good" if not "great" category.

 

I completely agree. My jaw dropped when I saw it was Pauline. I thought the dead body in the cab was the guy Rawlins bumped off to get the diamonds. Ooops! From that moment on, I was really sucked into the film. It was now a serious film noir.

 

Here I appreciated Linda's pushy nature and it showed her loyalty as well as her seeking amends. She really cared for Ernie Driscoll.

 

You've got it. The film is about being in a person's corner, for better, for worse. Ernie does this for Linda and Linda does it for Ernie.

 

The scene in the apartment between Driscoll and Mickey was just brutal. Payne really knows how to make those fight scenes come alive and I was just waiting for him to get the upper hand. That was a tough brawl!

 

Great observation. I loved all of Payne's fight scenes. He was definitely a fighter, with me. Jack Lambert was sensational in this film. His "Mickey" was spot on. Ol' Mick had no idea who he was messing with in Ernie. He acted so superior to him. Little did he know.

 

The cab company sticking by one of their own was interesting and well done. Ernie had friends. He wasn't just an ill tempered brooder, he worried me at first because he was quick to take his troubles out on others. A short fuse. However understandable his emotions might be. A boxer might have more control, or maybe not. Loyalty comes up again and it highlights Ernie's redeeming qualities in the eyes of those who really know him.

 

And this is where Stan (Frank Faylen) plays a significant role in this film. He's a "Walter Brennan" with real influence. The cut man is definitely in your corner. He reins in Ernie.

 

The scene in the bar between Linda and Rawlins was good. She shows her pushy side again, and her kooky side. The actress in Linda comes out and she's playing with fire here. Dexter's Rawlins is definitely a tough customer. (I do think he is really good in this movie) When Linda mentions Pauline, I think she knows she needs to pull out some trick to play for time. It works but now she's in even more danger.

 

Miss G is very correct about Brad Dexter's "Rawlins." He's so smooth. You can see the ladies falling for him and his easy eyes.

 

The ending, with all the major players coming together on River Street was well done. The whole movie was full of twists and turns leading up to this. The final battle was inevitable but I found it all pretty darn satisfying after all that had come before, the final scene back in the gym was pretty uplifting for a noir but I liked it.

 

I was impressed by the film, as well. I really enjoyed the ride. It's a film that captures film noir. Love those seedy characters. Jay Adler was brilliant as "Christopher." He likes the dames. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sir Francis:

 

*I completely agree. My jaw dropped when I saw it was Pauline. I thought the person in the trunk of the cab was the guy Rawlins bumped off to get the diamonds. Ooops! From that moment on, I was really sucked into the film. It was now a serious film noir.*

 

Somehow I knew that is what was happening to Pauline. Maybe more the camera angle than Rawlins need to do it. But I was very surprised to find her in the cab. It does roll on from there. Linda then has to get into gear to show her loyalty and, I think, earn her way back into Ernie's good graces.

 

Isn't it odd how the women were all about themselves? (At least at the beginning.)

 

Edited by: movieman1957 on Jan 19, 2011 9:53 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

99 RIVER STREET SPOILED OVER

 

Somehow I knew that is what was happening to Pauline. Maybe more the camera angle than Rawlins need to do it. But I was very surprised to find her in the cab. It does roll on from there.

 

It was all there to be seen, especially the final shot of her with Rawlins pulling tighter on the scarf.

I should have known better. But it caught me off-guard.

 

Linda then has to get into gear to show her loyalty and, I think, earn her way back into Ernie's good graces.

 

You're definitely right about that. Ernie felt cheap and used, so Linda had a lot of proving to do.

 

Isn't it odd how the women were all about themselves? (At least at the beginning.)

 

In film noir, it's usually the M.O. But when the good girl makes a monkey out of our hero, it was surprising. What's a guy to do?! Pass the banana.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=FrankGrimes wrote:}{quote}

> 99 RIVER STREET IS FLOODED WITH SPOILAGE

>

> We know which guy you chose, Pauline! Typical!

>

 

I'm no Pauline, but I can't help but swoon over Dexter's eyes. He's

a very, very average package but his eyes are extraordinary. It's intersting

he's almost always the bad guy. Remember Macao?

 

> I confess I was worried for Evelyn Keyes in that diner. I thought any second now he's

> going to smack her or shoot her! The more he smiled, the more worried I felt.

>

> :) Ssssssssssss!

>

 

No kid. It's an excellent villain. He's one of my favorite villains now. And part of the reason is because he worked alone, did you notice? He went up against a more organized group and used his brains to outwit them. I like that. Too bad he had to be a killer. He would have made it, too, except he had to take on Ernie physically, his one mistake. He should have kept running.

 

> She was in his corner!

>

 

Making a noose!

 

 

> Yeah, yeah, yeah. You just want to read about all the guys she was with.

>

 

Well, she did marry John Huston, which ought to earn her a medal. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=JackFavell wrote:}{quote}

> Thanks for that link, Goddess - you also reminded me I wanted to check out Classiflix.

 

I use it and Netflix...so what one lacks in its library, the other generally has. They have a huge library and you can purchase from them as well as rent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...