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Classic Era Films I Have Not Seen


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I checked over the top 250 films ranked on IMDB. I have seen 171 of them, but have seen most of the pre 1970 ones, here are few I have not seen. Let me know your opinions of them and if they are worth checking out.

Sherlock Jr (1924)

Metropolis (1927)

The Passion Of Joan Of Arc (1928)

To Be Or Not To Be (1942)

The Wages Of Fear (1953)

Rififi (1955)

Wild Strawberries (1957)

Yojimbo (1961)

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20 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Sherlock Jr (1924)...Fun

Metropolis (1927)...Influential

The Passion Of Joan Of Arc (1928)...Memorable

To Be Or Not To Be (1942)...Overrated

The Wages Of Fear (1953)...Excellent

Rififi (1955)...Good

Wild Strawberries (1957)...Poignant

Yojimbo (1961)...Great

Of course nobody is going to like everything.

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I've only seen four on your list up there myself.  All worth a look.

Metropolis (1927)

The Passion Of Joan Of Arc (1928)

To Be Or Not To Be (1942)

Wild Strawberries (1957)

The first two silents offer stunning cinematography and effects, more so METROPOLIS.   And if you like a lot of sad faced close ups, the Joan of Arc flick will fill that bill.

TO BE OR NOT TO BE, in my opinion, is probably Jack Benny's best foray into motion pictures. 

WILD STRAWBERRIES is typical Bergman  psychological  gut wrench, but a good story if you find either a dubbed copy or can read subtitles fast enough as to not miss much of what was photographed.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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Sherlock Jr is Keaton at his most inventive. This is one of his best visual stunts.

1924) Sherlock Junior animated gif

최고 Sherlock Jr GIF들 | Gfycat

deforest.tumblr.com - Tumbex

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25 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I checked over the top 250 films ranked on IMDB. I have seen 171 of them, but have seen most of the pre 1970 ones, here are few I have not seen. Let me know your opinions of them and if they are worth checking out.

Sherlock Jr (1924)

Metropolis (1927)

The Passion Of Joan Of Arc (1928)

To Be Or Not To Be (1942)

The Wages Of Fear (1953)

Rififi (1955)

Wild Strawberries (1957)

Yojimbo (1961)

I,ll Dive into One of 'em..

 

   Though.. ... as TopBilled Succinctly Points Out ,and Posits..

 

Nobody is Gonna Like Everything..

😐🤷‍♀️🤷‍♂️🤷‍♀️🤷‍♀️🤷‍♀️

_

Sherlock Jr.

 

 

     Im Frankly Surprised You Haven't Seen it..

 

 

Its EXQUISITE.. (imo)

 

   If Like Comedies..

...

One of my Three +Farourite Silent Era Comedies..

 

..along with Speedy and theGeneral,.

-

Buster Keaton..

 

 

Was (and Still Is.. Quite Frankly);, a Comedic Juggernaut WAY (WAY) WAY WAY Way Ahead of His Time ..

 

 

 

 

People .. Directors.. ..Actors, and Scripts STILL Borrow From Him.. -

(Even if it Is to the tune of Theme and Variations..

 

 

 

-- Everything (and Everybody) from Micmacs.. ..to 2 Guns.. ... Marx Brothers even perhaps.. ... Monte Python.. .... Mel Brooks.. --           - and Beyond...

 

 

 

 

 

 

B. Keaton = 🌈🎭🌈😂🌈🎨😂

 

 

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3 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Sherlock Jr is Keaton at his most inventive. This is one of his best visual stunts.

1924) Sherlock Junior animated gif

Easily One of the Tightest, Hystericalist Comedies ive ever seen..

 

 

Its Comedy Gold.🌈

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Although I HATE the phrase, I'm forced into using it----

MY BAD!

Thought the OP's listing of SHERLOCK JR. was of some other movie!  :o

Shameful thing for a Keaton freak to admit. :unsure:

Sepiatone

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47 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

I've only seen four on your list up there myself.  All worth a look.

Metropolis (1927)

The Passion Of Joan Of Arc (1928)

To Be Or Not To Be (1942)

Wild Strawberries (1957)

The first two silents offer stunning cinematography and effects, more so METROPOLIS.   And if you like a lot of sad faced close ups, the Joan of Arc flick will fill that bill.

TO BE OR NOT TO BE, in my opinion, is probably Jack Benny's best foray into motion pictures. 

WILD STRAWBERRIES is typical Bergman  psychological  gut wrench, but a good story if you find either a dubbed copy or can read subtitles fast enough as to not miss much of what was photographed.  ;) 

Sepiatone

I need to be in the right mood for silent films so I wish TCM On Demand would show Metropolis or Joan Of Arc so I can watch them when ready.

I have avoided To Be Or Not To Be since I am so used to Benny's TV persona of the fussy tightwad so I was not sure I could accept him in a different movie role.

Wild Strawberries is one I want to see the most, I have been a big fan of Bergman especially The Seventh Seal and Fanny And Alexander.  This 1957 film just never seems to show up on TCM or in revival theaters.

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2 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I checked over the top 250 films ranked on IMDB. I have seen 171 of them, but have seen most of the pre 1970 ones, here are few I have not seen. Let me know your opinions of them and if they are worth checking out.

Sherlock Jr (1924)

Metropolis (1927)

The Passion Of Joan Of Arc (1928)

To Be Or Not To Be (1942)

The Wages Of Fear (1953)

Rififi (1955)

Wild Strawberries (1957)

Yojimbo (1961)

They are all worth seeing.

You can see both Metropolis (1927, even the fully to-date restored version) and The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928) on various internet sources like Internet Archive, YouTube, and dailymotion.  Metropolis is one of the great monuments of moviemaking.  Some parts will seem dated to the point of silliness, but ultimately it is a powerful statement about humanity and compassion.  It set the pattern for all dystopic visions of society.  The Passion. . . has one of the supreme performances on screen.  Excruciating to watch--in a good way.

To Be or Not To Be (1942).  I don't care for it much, but it has Carole Lombard in it.

The Wages of Fear (1953).  The best of the French film noir emulations.  An absolutely nihilistic portrait of human existence (goody).  Plus, thrilling scenes piled on one after another.  A non-stop ride.

Rififi (1955).  Another iconic French noir emulation.  People focus on the heist, which is about the best in movies.  But, as with all great heist movies, it is the least important part.

Wild Strawberries (1957).  I don't know why so much criticism of this movie describes it as the bitter recollections of an aging scholar in the twilight of his life.  I see it as one of the most positive of Bergman's movies.  Sure there are tough and 'Bergmanesque' moments, but there is also lightness, humor, discovery and rediscovery of relationships.  And Bibi Andersson is a bright beam of sunlight.  At one time it was shown with a little regularity on TCM, but, with most Bergman, not so much anymore.

Yojimbo (1961).   Toshiro Mifune out-Toshiro Mifunes himself in this classic western.  The fact that it is set in Japan doesn't get in the way one bit.

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Are we considering the imdb top 250 as the basis for classic films we may not have seen?

If so, I haven't seen The Father (2020) yet and probably won't because there is dementia in my family. I don't care to see my future.

I haven't seen "Soul" (2020) and won't until I can buy a used Blu of it from a third party  because I refuse to contribute to Disney's coffers so they can continue to kiss up to the CCP.

Hamilton (2020) - Again, can't figure out how to see it without filling Disney's coffers.

Ones I haven't seen because I just haven't gotten around to it:

Harakiri (1962)

American History X - I've been meaning to watch this for years. I've heard nothing but good reports about it.

Whiplash (2014) - Sounds good, just haven't seen it.

Oldboy (2003)

Dangal (2016)

A bunch of others made  in the 21st century. 

 

Terminator 2  (1991) - I saw it but I wish I hadn't. Nothing can overcome Linda Hamilton's bad acting. In any film.

Shawshank Redemption (1994) - I just don't like films with that much violence regardless of how fine the rest of the film is. I've seen it once and will not likely see it again. 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I checked over the top 250 films ranked on IMDB. I have seen 171 of them, but have seen most of the pre 1970 ones, here are few I have not seen. Let me know your opinions of them and if they are worth checking out.

Sherlock Jr (1924)

Metropolis (1927)

The Passion Of Joan Of Arc (1928)

To Be Or Not To Be (1942)

The Wages Of Fear (1953)

Rififi (1955)

Wild Strawberries (1957)

Yojimbo (1961)

Oh, yes, every one of these films is worth seeing. I actually like all of them--not just admire them--and love most of them. Now I don't want to set your expectations too high, but:

Sherlock Jr.--Imaginative and funny. If you like Keaton at all, this is not to be missed.

Metropolis--The classic silent science fiction film. You need to see a restored version to enjoy the visuals. Warning: there are several musical soundtracks available, and.some are overbearing. You'll think of many SF films influenced by this one.

The Passion of Joan of Arc--Some extraordinary visuals and a great performance by Falconetti.

To Be or Not To Be--A good Ernst Lubitsch comedy. The subject shouldn't work, but does.

The Wages of Fear--Clouzot creates a society of outcasts in the oilfields of South America, then gives us nail-biting suspense as in few other films ever made, as the men drive truckloads of explosives over terrible roads. Dark and intense. Very existential--no pasts, nothing but the present, and everything on the line. Not to be watched on a day you need cheering up. Good performances, too, especially by Yves Montand and Charles Vanel.

Rififi--A film I can watch over and over. Basically a French version of The Asphalt Jungle, with an even longer silent sequence.

Wild Strawberries--This film used to be regularly available at revival houses, shown at college film series, etc. If you like any Bergman movies, you should see it. This was often the film that brought people to Bergman.

Yojimbo--Much imitated by Sergio Leone and others. Toshiro Mifune plays a samurai who hires himself out to both sides of a feud. Nothing wrong with Leone/Eastwood, but Kurosawa/Mifune, well, "the original is still the greatest."

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Jim, a film like Wild Strawberries may be available through your public library system, if you live in a major metropolitan area. Libraries tend to collect most of these classic titles.

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1 minute ago, kingrat said:

Jim, a film like Wild Strawberries may be available through your public library system, if you live in a major metropolitan area. Libraries tend to collect most of these classic titles.

And if not your local library, then a nearby college library would certainly have a collection of Ingmar Bergman films.

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51 minutes ago, LsDoorMat said:

Are we considering the imdb top 250 as the basis for classic films we may not have seen?

If so, I haven't seen The Father (2020) yet and probably won't because there is dementia in my family. I don't care to see my future.

I haven't seen "Soul" (2020) and won't until I can buy a used Blu of it from a third party  because I refuse to contribute to Disney's coffers so they can continue to kiss up to the CCP.

Hamilton (2020) - Again, can't figure out how to see it without filling Disney's coffers.

Ones I haven't seen because I just haven't gotten around to it:

Harakiri (1962)

American History X - I've been meaning to watch this for years. I've heard nothing but good reports about it.

Whiplash (2014) - Sounds good, just haven't seen it.

Oldboy (2003)

Dangal (2016)

A bunch of others made  in the 21st century. 

 

Terminator 2  (1991) - I saw it but I wish I hadn't. Nothing can overcome Linda Hamilton's bad acting. In any film.

Shawshank Redemption (1994) - I just don't like films with that much violence regardless of how fine the rest of the film is. I've seen it once and will not likely see it again. 

 

 

OldBoy is EXQUISITE.*

 

 

If You Like Your Films of the.. Harrd Boiled.. ..Film Noir(esque) Kind ...

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I consider: Yojimbo (1961) a must-see. It is intense and yet accessible.

I consider: Rififi (1955) to be a must-see also. It is virtually the definition of noir.

How much I like: To Be Or Not To Be (1942) depends on my mood. I feel it is definitely worth watching once. 

 

 

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To Be Or Not To Be (1942) seems not to be too popular here! It's not in my top 250 either but I like watching it to see the character actors doing comedy, who I fondly remember for films in other genres. Lionel Atwill (one of my all-time favorites), Sig Rumann, Henry Victor (another favorite), Stanley Ridges...and unbilled bit players who I love- Helmut Dantine, Leyland Hodgson, the great Alec Craig....

I also like it because 95% of WWII films are stories told from the American or British perspective. The people of Poland may have suffered and lost the most of any country's people in WWII. So I see it as paying some honor to their fight and their incredible losses.

The Wages Of Fear (1953). Wow! I didn't see this either until 2015, on the (medium) screen at Film Forum with a full house in  attendance. When the movie ended, I recall feeling worn out, mentally exhausted... as the lights came on, audience members were looking at each other and everyone seemed to have the WHAT DID I JUST SEE look on their faces. Strangers were looking at each other, like 'are you as emotionally destroyed as I am'? It's a must-see.

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4 hours ago, TopBilled said:

And if not your local library, then a nearby college library would certainly have a collection of Ingmar Bergman films.

If you're in the US, see if your library subscribes to Kanopy (kanopy.com). If yes, you will be able to stream Wild Strawberries and many of the other films mentioned in this thread.

The Criterion Channel may not be cheap ($90/year), but it's worth it to me.

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5 hours ago, Herman Bricks said:

To Be Or Not To Be (1942) seems not to be too popular here! It's not in my top 250 either but I like watching it to see the character actors doing comedy, who I fondly remember for films in other genres. Lionel Atwill (one of my all-time favorites), Sig Rumann, Henry Victor (another favorite), Stanley Ridges...and unbilled bit players who I love- Helmut Dantine, Leyland Hodgson, the great Alec Craig....

I also like it because 95% of WWII films are stories told from the American or British perspective. The people of Poland may have suffered and lost the most of any country's people in WWII. So I see it as paying some honor to their fight and their incredible losses.

The Wages Of Fear (1953). Wow! I didn't see this either until 2015, on the (medium) screen at Film Forum with a full house in  attendance. When the movie ended, I recall feeling worn out, mentally exhausted... as the lights came on, audience members were looking at each other and everyone seemed to have the WHAT DID I JUST SEE look on their faces. Strangers were looking at each other, like 'are you as emotionally destroyed as I am'? It's a must-see.

If This is of (Further) Interest, .. AWESOME.

 

If Not..

..

Dont Giveit another sniff...

_

In Terms of .. ... "Gruelling, ..Yet Rewarding" Films... .

- -- ---

Brimstone.

A 1000 Times GoodeNight.

and

The Tribe.....

 

 

..Are ..FANTASTIC,.

🙏

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I've seen them all. Usually I haven't. If people don't mind watching movies on

YT Wild Strawberries is available in a very crisp Criterion Collection version.

 

I would watch a film of paint drying as long as Vera Clouzot was in it.    ;)

 

tumblr_oopnhinQxe1u4mt3bo1_500.gifv

 

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15 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I checked over the top 250 films ranked on IMDB. I have seen 171 of them, but have seen most of the pre 1970 ones, here are few I have not seen. Let me know your opinions of them and if they are worth checking out.

Sherlock Jr (1924)

All I'll say is that Buster Keaton did "Duck Amuck", thirty years before Daffy did.  

("'And on this farm, he had an....igloo'.......Would it be too much to ask if we could make up our minds?")

Quote

Metropolis (1927)

If you can, track down the "Giorgio Moroder's" version from 1984.  (Or, just click the link, if you've got a living-room YouTube app.)  Oh, sure, there's the longer  "Definitive" restored version on Kino, but does it have Freddie Mercury on the soundtrack?  😎

Quote

To Be Or Not To Be (1942)

Even Jack Benny joked about this on his radio show:
"Oh, look, Rochester, they're showing To Be or Not to Be...Gee, that was a good one."
"Boss, that was theeee good one!"

Quote

Yojimbo (1961)

Sure, why not?  But be sure to look up Sanjuro (1962) immediately afterwards.

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15 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I checked over the top 250 films ranked on IMDB. I have seen 171 of them, but have seen most of the pre 1970 ones, here are few I have not seen. Let me know your opinions of them and if they are worth checking out.

Sherlock Jr (1924)

Metropolis (1927)

The Passion Of Joan Of Arc (1928)

To Be Or Not To Be (1942)

The Wages Of Fear (1953)

Rififi (1955)

Wild Strawberries (1957)

Yojimbo (1961)

Watched To Be or Not To Be

But would also Love if they showed Joan of Arc and Metropolis I have not seen those

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12 hours ago, LsDoorMat said:

Are we considering the imdb top 250 as the basis for classic films we may not have seen?

If so, I haven't seen The Father (2020) yet and probably won't because there is dementia in my family. I don't care to see my future.

I haven't seen "Soul" (2020) and won't until I can buy a used Blu of it from a third party  because I refuse to contribute to Disney's coffers so they can continue to kiss up to the CCP.

Hamilton (2020) - Again, can't figure out how to see it without filling Disney's coffers.

Ones I haven't seen because I just haven't gotten around to it:

Harakiri (1962)

American History X - I've been meaning to watch this for years. I've heard nothing but good reports about it.

Whiplash (2014) - Sounds good, just haven't seen it.

Oldboy (2003)

Dangal (2016)

A bunch of others made  in the 21st century. 

 

Terminator 2  (1991) - I saw it but I wish I hadn't. Nothing can overcome Linda Hamilton's bad acting. In any film.

Shawshank Redemption (1994) - I just don't like films with that much violence regardless of how fine the rest of the film is. I've seen it once and will not likely see it again. 

 

 

Wondering on your comment of not liking movies with that much violence.  Do you not believe that kind of violence really existed or still does exist?  

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Just now, yeasandi said:

Wondering on your comment of not liking movies with that much violence.  Do you not believe that kind of violence really existed or still does exist?  

I hope I am wording this right because I truly am not trying to I guess offend you, I really do want to understand.  I guess I grew up knowing violence so seeing it in film has never really bothered me

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I had never seen THE SNAKE PIT until last week when I picked up a very nice 16mm print. I thought it was very good and deserved its reputation. However, I was surprised that Fox, who had pioneered docudrama productions, littered the supporting cast with name players as patients at the asylum. In contrast with Warners' CAGED, in which the prison inmates were played by mostly unknown actresses, SNAKE PIT had almost every non-glamorous (or formerly glamorous) actress in Hollywood. Ruth Donnelly, Isabel Jewell, Victoria "Mrs. Jack Oakie" Horne, Celeste Holm, Lee Patrick, Beulah Bondi, Ann Doran, Jacqueline de Wit, Queenie Smith, etc.  What a casting call! And it was somewhat distracting.  I bet audiences were nudging their companions ans whispering "oh, I remember her!" or "say, isn't that....?" throughout auditoriums. The most effective performance may have been by newcomer Betsy Blair.

I must also confess I was expecting a "Harder They Fall" ending, whereby deHavilland, who plays a writer, is released from the asylum and goes home, takes out her typewriter and begins to write "...The....Snake...Pit".  Nope. She and her husband just got on a bus.

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