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BRONXGIRL'S MOTHER, HENRY FONDA'S HIRSUTENESS, ETC.


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On 7/16/2020 at 3:13 PM, laffite said:

Hey Barb, I have an idea. Why don't you visit San Diego? I happen to know that the weather is exactly the same as the Riviera. 'Course there might be a dearth of Frenchiness, etc,  and I doubt that you'll find Alain here. But it's ... it's ... oh heck, it's boring. Never mind. You're better off dreaming ...

Hi MissG, how wonderful to see a post from you!

laffite

My "American Riviera" fantasy has always been Santa Barbara!  (and not just for the name, lol)  Would love to visit.

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10 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Miss Goddess, I would also take Gabin over Delon any day of the week!  

A couple of days ago TCM showed Bertrand Tavernier's My Journey Through French Cinema (2017) and Gabin was all over it. Such a solid, dependable actor. It's long (3 1/2 hours) so I'm still working my way through it, but so many great movies I've never even heard of, let alone seen.  Scorcese did something similar for TCM sometime in the early-2000's called My Voyage in Italy about Italian cinema and I keep hoping they'll repeat it. Thank God for movies, especially these days.

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1 hour ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Hi, matey!   

lol.   Wouldn't want Bronxgirl's Mother thread to usurp/hijack the other forums in terms of their individual genres.  Not sure about this in "etiquette" terms.   Correct me if I'm off base about this!

Movies are presumably fair game but etiquette is a point to be considered, for reasons you point out and especially that of an OP's preference. Given also that this wonderful thread has never been principally an in-depth movie discussion thread, per se,. as was, for example, the FrankGrimesTortureThread. Or MissG,s  threads the names of which escapes my poor brain. There was a Part I and a Part II. The notion of a revival of golden times past is a sweet idea but perhaps not practicable unless we reach out to former denizens of the troop anyway. Just musing about the idea is probably enough for now. No, you are not off base at all, the inspiration for this thread is so venerable that such considerations are necessary, as you also point out.

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10 hours ago, DougieB said:

A couple of days ago TCM showed Bertrand Tavernier's My Journey Through French Cinema (2017) and Gabin was all over it. Such a solid, dependable actor. It's long (3 1/2 hours) so I'm still working my way through it, but so many great movies I've never even heard of, let alone seen.  Scorcese did something similar for TCM sometime in the early-2000's called My Voyage in Italy about Italian cinema and I keep hoping they'll repeat it. Thank God for movies, especially these days.

I watched it!  Quite long but fascinating.  Several films I never even heard of.  And yes, Gabin was delightfully front and center.   I thought, however, that Tavernier went a bit overboard stating that the French took their movie scores much more seriously than the Americans.  Listening to him, I wondered if they ever heard, say, Hermann's for THE GHOST AND MRS. MUIR or David Raksin's FOREVER AMBER (even better than LAURA, much more evocative and so, so beautiful)    I don't remember seeing the Scorcese doc.

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9 hours ago, laffite said:

Movies are presumably fair game but etiquette is a point to be considered, for reasons you point out and especially that of an OP's preference. Given also that this wonderful thread has never been principally an in-depth movie discussion thread, per se,. as was, for example, the FrankGrimesTortureThread. Or MissG,s  threads the names of which escapes my poor brain. There was a Part I and a Part II. The notion of a revival of golden times past is a sweet idea but perhaps not practicable unless we reach out to former denizens of the troop anyway. Just musing about the idea is probably enough for now. No, you are not off base at all, the inspiration for this thread is so venerable that such considerations are necessary, as you also point out.

Really appreciate your kind words and insights, my friend.  I would just like this thread to continue in the same vein as it always has, no more and no less -- a little bit of this and a little bit of that.... 

I just know that Mom is looking down on us from her heavenly perch, watching the movies along with us and whispering in my ear "Tell them I still think Henry Fonda is hairy"

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In a nostalgic mood, I decided to re-read this entire thread starting at the very beginning when I created it.   Wow, we did have fun!  I had forgotten how in-depth our movie discussions were and the way they took us to strange, surreal places -- from the fish lips of Troy Donahue to George Raft's shaved underarms.....I think I'm going to cry!

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On 7/18/2020 at 3:41 AM, Bronxgirl48 said:

I just know that Mom is looking down on us from her heavenly perch, watching the movies along with us and whispering in my ear "Tell them I still think Henry Fonda is hairy"

I wonder if she's come to an understanding of Julie Christie's hair, or if that will forever remain a mystery.

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On 7/19/2020 at 8:02 AM, DougieB said:

I wonder if she's come to an understanding of Julie Christie's hair, or if that will forever remain a mystery.

Mom probably still thinks Grant was married to Betty Hutton and Diahann Carroll.   She needs to hop on over to the next cloud and get the straight scoop direct from Cary.

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On 4/28/2014 at 11:14 AM, Bronxgirl48 said:

First things first -- I saw THE OX-BOW INCIDENT last night, but on Retroplex!  Completely unexpected -- was channel surfing and there it was.  This was before I was going to try and see if the YouTube version was working properly. (and I now want to immediately "revisit" the film there this evening before scribbling my comments about it at our Western round-up)  I've got one thing to say  about Mary Beth Hughes -- I have a feeling young Norma Jean watched her more than Betty Grable in order to develop an intriguing and sexy screen image.  Tell me I'm crazy, or not, lol.

You are not. I adore Mary Beth. She never made it out of B's. I think.

Hey barb, I'm looking for that post. I'm at a spot where I have entered the conversation. Therefore it could be right around the corner. :)

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On 7/17/2011 at 2:45 AM, Bronxgirl48 said:

I couldn't tell if BETRAYED was actually intended to be tongue-in-cheek, The Brits are very British, with lots of "The Gerries!" and "She's cracking good!" (whatever THAT means, but, they're referring to Lana Turner, so you can guess) Gable looks weary, is out of breath when he has to deliver some elaborate dialogue, and at times actually stumbles over a few other lines. He's a colonel in the Dutch army. They get an unflatteringly brunette, respectably-widowed but former party girl, Lana Turner, to spy for the Allies. She goes through rigorous training which she is successful at except jumping out of a plane. Lana is given glasses because she is supposed to impersonate a schoolteacher. Nazi Anton Diffring strolls into "her" laboratory and Turner correctly identifies animal species with long Latin names. He invites her to a little Gestapo get-together where she sits on top of a piano and sings (dubbed). In the meantime, the most ridiculous character is introduced, called "The Scarf", Victor Mature, who at one point tells Lana, "How do you like being Mati Hari? Just pretend it's a nightmare!" Mature is a rogue-ish, colorful Resistance leader whose favorite phrase of contempt involves something to do with cockroaches. He struts around like Errol Flynn, but without the charm. Mature seems in on the "joke" if we could just figure out what that exactly IS. At one point I actually thought Herbert Lom as Chief Inspector Dreyfuss would show up. Gable and Turner don't generate any of their past team heat; in fact, it's kind of a snooze. "Darling!" she calls Clark, but all the passion seems to have drained out of him. A traitor in their midst needs to be routed out -- who is it? Do you care? The script thinks it's being clever, but, you be the judge.

 

Gee, Barb, I hope you don't think I am making too much of you. But the above is so good. I could never do that. Do you remember your review of The 49th Parallel ? How about Blood Alibi? Or The Big Shakedown? I have the dates of these if you want to see them. There is such vitality and humor, an uncommonly clever use of language, and what you write is so completely your own. I can't find the 123 post but it was like the above. I'm trying to find it, that's how I ran across these others. There are more on 7-18-12 and 8-18-12. I know I'm killing you with all this praise. I'll try to simmer down.  ;)

PS You're great! 

PPS You must be Rudy's greatest fan.

PPPS If you're just popping in, Bronxgirl48 made a generous comment to me on another thread, prompting me to reflect on how much I have enjoyed her fine writing over the years.

///

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On 7/17/2020 at 4:40 PM, DougieB said:

A couple of days ago TCM showed Bertrand Tavernier's My Journey Through French Cinema (2017) and Gabin was all over it. Such a solid, dependable actor. It's long (3 1/2 hours) so I'm still working my way through it, but so many great movies I've never even heard of, let alone seen.  Scorcese did something similar for TCM sometime in the early-2000's called My Voyage in Italy about Italian cinema and I keep hoping they'll repeat it. Thank God for movies, especially these days.

Hi Dougie! I saw Martin Scorsese's voyage to Italy and most of the French one. Always, always informative and entrancing. Could talk film with him for hours, right?

Gabin is like the French Spencer Tracy to me.

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4 hours ago, MissGoddess said:

Hi Dougie! I saw Martin Scorsese's voyage to Italy and most of the French one. Always, always informative and entrancing. Could talk film with him for hours, right?

Gabin is like the French Spencer Tracy to me.

Yeah. One of those people who seemed like an old soul from day one. You're right about the Tracy similarity; they could both go dark and they could both go light. 

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23 hours ago, laffite said:

Gee, Barb, I hope you don't think I am making too much of you. But the above is so good. I could never do that. Do you remember your review of The 49th Parallel ? How about Blood Alibi? Or The Big Shakedown? I have the dates of these if you want to see them. There is such vitality and humor, an uncommonly clever use of language, and what you write is so completely your own. I can't find the 123 post but it was like the above. I'm trying to find it, that's how I ran across these others. There are more on 7-18-12 and 8-18-12. I know I'm killing you with all this praise. I'll try to simmer down.  ;)

PS You're great! 

PPS You must be Rudy's greatest fan.

PPPS If you're just popping in, Bronxgirl48 made a generous comment to me on another thread, prompting me to reflect on how much I have enjoyed her fine writing over the years.

///

Oh my gosh, lafitte, I do remember BETRAYED, lol.  Why thank you so much.   I also (vividly) recall what I wrote about Anton Walbrook in THE 49th PARALLEL.  (comparing him to...um, well, maybe I shouldn't say....) 

I'm a complete blank on BLOOD ALIBI and THE BIG SHAKEDOWN.  (are they in the year 2012?)

I love the two Rudys -- Valentino and Vallee (the latter not in any romantic way but as an underrated character actor).

I was always obsessed with armpits.  Wallace Ford's in particular.  They were the worst!

 

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5 hours ago, MissGoddess said:

 

Gabin is like the French Spencer Tracy to me.

But with sex appeal!  They both resembled potatoes.  (my favorite vegetable!)

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On 7/21/2020 at 5:49 PM, laffite said:

You are not. I adore Mary Beth. She never made it out of B's. I think.

Hey barb, I'm looking for that post. I'm at a spot where I have entered the conversation. Therefore it could be right around the corner. :)

Hughes made a movie with Bugs Bunny, er, I mean, Lloyd Nolan.  It might have been one of his Michael Shaynes.  (relying on my memory and not Google right now)

The elusive ONE,TWO,THREE, lol.

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I've got THE SHOP AROUND THE CORNER on in the background.

It's a marvel that I can actually suspend disbelief and accept Jimmy Stewart as a Hungarian.  

That's my opinion, my honest opinion, lol.

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5 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Oh my gosh, lafitte, I do remember BETRAYED, lol.  Why thank you so much.   I also (vividly) recall what I wrote about Anton Walbrook in THE 49th PARALLEL.  (comparing him to...um, well, maybe I shouldn't say....) 

I'm a complete blank on BLOOD ALIBI and THE BIG SHAKEDOWN.  (are they in the year 2012?)

I love the two Rudys -- Valentino and Vallee (the latter not in any romantic way but as an underrated character actor).

I was always obsessed with armpits.  Wallace Ford's in particular.  They were the worst!

 

Oooops, it's BLIND ALIBI, not Blood. May you'll recall it now. If not, it's from Oct 11 2012. THE BIG SHAKEDOWN is from July 13, 2011. Two other dates are July 18 2012 and August 18 2012, of these latter two, one has four shorter capsule reviews, one of which is SMILE'N THROUGH. Why don't I find them and put a LIKE on them, yes? Then they will be transmitted to you. lzcutter made a cute comment about the thread being RUDYMENTARY, ha. You probably remember that. Yes, the elusive one, two, three. It could be in Rambles, I or II. In any case, it was yours, no doubt.

I have never heard of an obsession with armpits. I may have to google it. A History of Armpits may be imperative if they are that interesting. ;) Or is this a woman thing? Despite my great age, I am as naive as ever about some things.:D

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Hmm, BLIND ALIBI, nothing reverberates in my brain pan (which is smaller than the crows that Melanie Daniels talks to Daddy about in THE BIRDS).  SMILIN' THROUGH, ditto.  I'm only on page 68 of this thread, January 2011.   Ah, Miss G.'s Rambles!   Ah, lzcutter....(but don't remember RUDYMENTARY)   Well, if you want to transmit those reviews, go ahead, I won't stop ya.  (I just hope people don't get bored with my childish comments)

The armpits are a Bronxgirl thing I am sorry to say.  (ears as well -- the one thing I didn't like about John Garfield)  

Someone once sent me a candid photo of Bela Lugosi's underarms as he was going through body movements that Walt Disney used for the demon in that frightening Night on Bald Mountain sequence of FANTASIA.   

 

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On 8/18/2012 at 6:49 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

 

Leslie! Leslie! You know that Myrna Loy tribute by Julianne Moore? The more I read about his quirks, I'm going, "He had agoraphobia? Me too! He was a hypochondriac? Me too!" THE 49th PARALLEL -- this time around I actually found Larry quite endearing as a French-Canadian, warbling "Alouette", saying things to Nazi Eric Portman like "My fadder, he fought you in the first war. We licked you then and by golly, we do it again!" He also looks so cute in his lumberman shirt, lol. His fate was quite poignant to me. I didn't think I would have this reaction. I couldn't quite figure out the tone of 49TH PARALLEL; of course it's a propaganda film but it also exhibits a fair amount of offbeat drollery. Niall MacGinness is sympathetic, although Portman still terrifies me with his lemon face, even if I suspect that his rather one-note ruthlessness might be a "playful" stylistic P&P device. Anton always startles me as Peter, because even when delivering his unforgettable "We are not your brothers" speech, his usual clipped, hissing delivery sounds so menacing, lol, almost counter-productive. I love the panoramic cinematography; the opening musical theme is somberly, hauntingly beautiful. I kind of enjoy the episodic nature of the story, with all the carefully constructed star-cameo vignettes, not the least of which is Leslie as Philip Armstrong Scott. (isn't that a perfect Leslie Howard screen name?) It's almost as though he ambled off the PETRIFIED FOREST set and then somehow took a rowboat to Canada, lol, settling into his art and book filled tepee to match wits with the Nazis. (no contest) He's his usual deceptively unassuming self, tossing off ironic witticisms and intellectual musings, all the better to catch the enemy off guard and show them what he's really made of. Parts of the movie reminded me of Hitchcock and also Fritz Lang.

 

Hold on, let me get some coffee and I'll be back with PIMPERNEL SMITH.

 

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Aug 19, 2012 2:35 AM

Well, here's one. I hadn't yet posted on the thread yet when this post was sent. So these ones I like I had never seen before. I'm still looking for that phantom post I remember you doing and I'm running into all these others that I haven't seen. I don't have the patience to read absolutely everything that everybody wrote, but I try to slow down and actually do just that when I can. It's rather fun. I think I come on the thread somewhere in the 90s page-wise.

If you're on page 68 and still going you will eventually see these. But I'll put up a couple others at least, if you don't mind. You know, you spoke highly of UP THE DOWN STAIRCASE and I've ordered it from Netflix. I actually made a couple of comments that I thought at least  made sense but today I don't remember a thing about it and my words seem strange on the page, nary a memory now.. But your remarks about nostalgia and authenticity won me over.

//

 

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lafitte, I can't tell you how flattered I am.   You're really taking me back to the good "old" days with this!  And how we all came together for some good (or naughty) fun in connection with our love of movies.  I also struggle with patience in going through the entirety of these pages but curiosity, (as well as nostalgia) is taking the lead and thankfully slowing me down some.     Don't remember what I wrote about UP THE DOWN STAIRCASE, but it holds a special place in my heart.   Very bittersweet.  Authentic.   Sandy Dennis is an acquired taste but I do believe this is her best performance.

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Bronxgirl48  (Sept 26 2010) Oy, WUTHERING HEIGHTS, well, there goes my "Dr. Bronxie" title down the tubes, because quite frankly, I am stumped. Now understand, I've never read the novel so have only this film adaption to go on. Cathy's dual personality is quickly established in the flashback -- she's romping about with Hindley and doesn't want to get spruced up for her father's arrival, but then is immediately interested in being fairly presentable for any possible gifts he may have brought back with him. (little does she know...) Then of course her first reaction to Heathcliff is a rather snooty "He's dirty". But Cathy has found a handsome little playmate she can fantasize with ("I've always wanted to meet a noble prince"). Heathcliff goes along with her fairy tales. To her, the cliff is a castle, to him, it's just a cliff, but he is swept up in the game-playing. Heathcliff seems merely a blank slate for Cathy's imaginative outlets. This gypsy beggar has no definable past, or one he doesn't remember or want to share with his new "family". Frankly I think he's a bit too dull-witted to resist her imperious charms. (noir material there) I don't know when Mrs. Earnshaw died, but her death had a profound effect on the children. Without the firm but gentle guidance of a mother, Cathy and Hindley ran wild but were stunted emotionally, Both became hard in their own ways. Heathcliff too. Cecil Kellaway was an absentee parent. When he brought Heathcliff into the fold, Hindley became rageful with jealousy. Hindley didn't have a mother's love to lean on, and the father didn't seem to care enough. After Earnshaw's death, Hindley pulls away from Cathy and starts asserting his territorial rights, which includes treating Cathy not as a beloved sibling, but a weak female whom he can order about. Heathcliff is resentful of Hindley's treatment. So it would be natural that Heathcliff and Cathy cling to each other. On some level I think Cathy is frustrated at the passive female role she's required to play in that society. She has no power. Hindley (who calls them "birds of a feather") is weak, cruel, and contemptuous. There's no love lost between brother and sister. When she tells Heathcliff to go out and bring back "the world" for her, it's because she can't do it herself in that same aggressive, masculine way. A woman's only choice was to make an advantageous marriage, which Cathy eventually does (to become Queen of the Indoors) Until then, she's making mad, passionate, physical love Outdoors to Heathcliff among the heather. (Wyler makes this as clear to the audience as the Production Code will allow) What is the significance of "I am Heathcliff?" Might it mean that Cathy is internalizing Heathcliff's "maleness"? It could suggest that the two lovers are one soul, but maybe Cathy also identifies with Heathcliff, not merely in his sufferings, but, with his capacity for actualization, which to her dismay, he cannot carry out, because he is so pathologically attached to her that he'll put up with Hindley's atrocious behavior.

Wowsa!!!

We did this in my book club some time ago. This reminds of the conversation. This is so good at capturing the story without having had read the novel. I wish I could make a comment having read the book within the last year but your post, Barb, is too fluent for me at the moment. I was not crazy about the story. I haven's seen the movie in years ...

SueSue wrote on July 22, 2011 : "This thread is so much fun, it should be required reading... it's RUDYMENTARY!!!!" Bronxgirl's mom thread. (as in Valentino)

"If Will hadn’t been born, Twain would have invented him." ---MissGoddess (August 28, 2010) Rambles 2 (ooh, good one, MissG) Will Rogers, of course.

"How much is Dick Powell in the window?" ---Bronxgirl48 Aug 10, 2010 Rambles 2 (a conversation about flutter, as in, of the heart)

"I watched A FACE IN THE CROWD again last week and had a nightmare that Andy Griffith took Vitajex and was chasing me around the apartment. I woke up in a sweat" ---Bronxgirl48 Sep 18 2010 Rambles2

 Barb. some of the goils back then disagreed with you. But if I were a girl, I think I would agree with you. He's not my type.

///

 

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lafitte,  Andy Griffith as Lonesome Roads was truly casting genius.  I've never been able to "see" him in anything else, and certainly not Sheriff Taylor of Mayberry.   His natural sinister beetle brows don't help.  I was always thinking "this guy could have played a werewolf in some Night Gallery episode".   (I'll have to go back on this thread and see who actually thought Griffith was any kind of sexy.  Not to my eyes)

Ah, yes, Dick Powell....I remember.  YOU NEVER CAN TELL.  Delightful little fantasy comedy of a murdered German Shepherd (Dick) reincarnated into a human being so he can solve his own murder!  I love this film.   Another Powell charmer is IT HAPPENED TOMORROW (Rene Clair, you can't go wrong) 

As for WUTHERING HEIGHTS, I probably should have included some remarks about Merle Oberon's performance and as an actress in general.   She had an imperious, icy quality in every movie I've ever seen her in.   Hard to warm up to.  Beautiful but lacking real talent imo.  Much like Hedy Lamarr.

Rambles I and II -- brilliant threads, wonderful people.  

 

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3 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

lafitte,  Andy Griffith as Lonesome Roads was truly casting genius.  I've never been able to "see" him in anything else, and certainly not Sheriff Taylor of Mayberry.   His natural sinister beetle brows don't help.  I was always thinking "this guy could have played a werewolf in some Night Gallery episode".   (I'll have to go back on this thread and see who actually thought Griffith was any kind of sexy.  Not to my eyes)

Ah, yes, Dick Powell....I remember.  YOU NEVER CAN TELL.  Delightful little fantasy comedy of a murdered German Shepherd (Dick) reincarnated into a human being so he can solve his own murder!  I love this film.   Another Powell charmer is IT HAPPENED TOMORROW (Rene Clair, you can't go wrong) 

As for WUTHERING HEIGHTS, I probably should have included some remarks about Merle Oberon's performance and as an actress in general.   She had an imperious, icy quality in every movie I've ever seen her in.   Hard to warm up to.  Beautiful but lacking real talent imo.  Much like Hedy Lamarr.

Rambles I and II -- brilliant threads, wonderful people.  

 

I was flabbergasted when I saw Andy in A FACE IN THE CROWD. I didn't know he could act like that. He seemed a natural. It was so long ago. I remember thinking, what happened. I mean did he ever equal that? I remember reading that he did not like drama, or something. Here is an unpleasant disclosure, hee ... I remember laughing my rear off when I first saw DON'T GO NEAR THE WATER and in the theater when if first came out! But it seemed to me he could have had a better career with than innate talent.

Not a Dick Powell fan, but he is good nonetheless. The early singing made me wince, that high pitched syrupy sweet sound assailing my ears. Oooouieeee. Some grain of pseudo-macho made me see him as a sissy. But of course I am so mature now ... I couldn't think that now. (think: mature = old) But I will look for those titles you mentioned. Now that I have TCM again.

You had mentioned on the R2 thread that you preferred ALGIERS over PEPE LE MOKO and I agree. Hedy Lamarr DID have a rep for decidedly un-stellar acting chops. But whatever her faults, the vacuous look or whatever, served her well in ALGIERS. She was relatively non-emotive (I seem to remember) while listening and talking to M. Boyer about Paris  They made Paris sound so good within that confining labyrinth.  Looking so serenely beautiful was enough for her, or a good deal of enough.

So ... why don't says something about Merle Oberon's Kathy now? Seriously, I would love to hear your take. I don't remember anything to wrong with her but the movie is not fresh in mind. But I sort of get your point, that "icy" quality. After reading your review of this Kathy, delighted to have a champion in Heathcliff to entertain her whims, Merle doesn't seem right at all. Now you make me want to watch it again through your eyes. You're a game changer, Barb. In fact. Your reviews are so trenchant, I am drawn to  watch them.

///

 

 

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