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BRONXGIRL'S MOTHER, HENRY FONDA'S HIRSUTENESS, ETC.


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On 7/18/2012 at 8:03 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

IT'S LOVE I'M AFTER has wonderful comic pitch all around, it never sags or becomes desperate --even Bette's natural fierceness is the perfect foil for all the (elegantly) farcial moments. Did you catch NEVER THE TWAIN SHALL MEET? Oh, my goodness, ha! Drawing-room Leslie follows scary-eyed, hip rotating, I-love-you-long-time Conchita Montenegro to her Polynesian island where Leslie's dormant but hide-bound British "civility" comes to the forefront and watches with politically incorrect horror as the natives go about their relaxed "uninhibited" lifestyle. Conchita tries to put him at ease: "It is nothing strange to my people". But Leslie just can't cope, and winds up venting his frustration and bending the old elbow at an ex-pat watering hole. In no time at all he "deteriorates" into a sweaty, jealous, disillusioned mess.

SMILIN' THROUGH, however, was a revelation! Oh...my...goodness! The ending puts THE GHOST & MRS. MUIR and WUTHERING HEIGHTS (together) almost to shame! I was a Kleenex-riddled puddle. Exquisite cinematography (you'll be reminded of the 1940 WATERLOO BRIDGE) poetic, sentimental, beautifully crafted, bittersweet story of love, revenge and redemption -- Tommy's ma (Beryl!) runs the tea "shoppe" where Fredric March (giving the kind of strong, "modern" performance he'd be known for later in his career -- this is only 1932, but he's not florid at all!) and Norma Shearer ritually meet in order to keep their romance a secret from her Uncle Leslie, who is consumed with hate over a tragedy that has haunted him for fifty years, and he can't seem to let go of the memory. I adore this movie! Norma's "Isn't it a pity...?" will have you drowning in tears.

Fell asleep during FIVE AND DIME, only saw bits and pieces. Douglass Montgomery and Richard Bennett's characters were more interesting to me than Leslie and Marion's.

OUTWARD BOUND was disappointing. Creaky, stage-bound early talkie, the primitive techniques overshadowing for me any emotional investment in the spiritual/philosophical messages. Laughable in spots, including Leslie unfortunately, especially when he intuits the voyage's true nature. Beryl again! And Helen Chandler, who I'd never seen in anything other than Mina in DRACULA, sounds exactly the same, lol, i.e. annoying, with that weird, high-pitched, tremulous voice. I did like Doug, Jr., however. I don't remember the remake, BETWEEN TWO WORLDS, all that well, but it's got to be better.

I've noticed Leslie's trademark mannerism -- In nearly every film, he leans (usually against a mantle) and rests hand on cheek, in a contemplative, soul-searching manner. It's what gives him that "sensitive" label.

Was pleasantly surprised by the geriatric ROMEO AND JULIET. My eyes, however, didn't focus on sweet, passionate, elderly Leslie, but gravitated towards Reginald Denny, and I don't just mean his delightfully rakish, crooked lower lip that always makes his hearty laugh very sexy. Reggie sure looked good in costume, but that silly codpiece or whatever it's called, lol, was distracting. I was embarrassed by Jack, sorry to say (even though Leslie seemed to enjoy Barrymore's performance) Edna Mae Oliver stole every scene as Nurse. "Scurvy knaves!"

I missed STAND-IN, FIRST OF THE FEW, and THE GENTLE SEX.

Lionel is terrific in A FREE SOUL. And Gable! Quel homme! (his democratic, down-to-earth masculinity shines even in THE EASIEST WAY with a very natural performance as Connie Bennett's working-class brother-in-law) You can't learn that in acting class, lol.

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Jul 19, 2012 1:55 PM

Hi Barb, I wanted to bring this up because it's your usual fine work but I am chagrined to admit that I haven't seen these films, drat. They deserve a shout out nonetheless. Going through these old threads is like mining for gold. And there is so much of it, These threads could be turned into books, for Heaven's sake. I have listed the films you reviewed above and will watch for them. Capsule reviews like this serves as previews in a way. You want to find them. If there's anything to add tot he above, fire away.

I want Possessed (1947) but it not on Netflix. I have always had an unpopular (or perhaps just wrong) view of Van Heflen's character. If I can be convinced that he was really that bad then I will fall back on blaming the actor for not having the acting chops to really bring that out. Or at least he may have been done it a lot better. there is something ambiguous in the portrayal that I can't shake off. To my eyes, it is arguable that he was a victim of her. But I wall hastily add that it would be far better to see this again before discussing. I has been a few years. A sort of pre-emptive comment to defend myself to the charge of sheer idiocy, haha.. Though I will endeavor to reply as best I can to any comment you may have.

I have another unpopular but unlike the above definitely not wrong view touching upon Women in Love, which i believe is 1969, based of course DH Lawrence. It involves the highly charged issue on what did Birkin mean when he said he wanted a perfect relation with a man. I'll leave it at that for now. It can be safely dropped, if preferred (though there is nothing untoward about the subject, I assure).

As I loyal Barbie fan, I would be delighted to read any new enthusiasm you have experienced in the movie world. Wait, let me get my popcorn. Your reviews are sometimes better than the movie, Ha.

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1 hour ago, laffite said:

I want Possessed (1947) but it not on Netflix.

 

I do not know what streaming platform you have but available on at least Roku is a channel named: "TV Time Feature Movies." The search function on my Roku shows that: Possessed (1947) is available there. I can not guarantee it as there has been a large deletion of movies on all: "TV Time" channels. They show movies free with commercials. Some even make a viewer feel at home by having the: TCM logo in one corner of the screen!

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48 minutes ago, SansFin said:

I do not know what streaming platform you have but available on at least Roku is a channel named: "TV Time Feature Movies." The search function on my Roku shows that: Possessed (1947) is available there. I can not guarantee it as there has been a large deletion of movies on all: "TV Time" channels. They show movies free with commercials. Some even make a viewer feel at home by having the: TCM logo in one corner of the screen!

I don't have Roku. I only have netflix and Criterion Channel. Another good source for me is the Public Library but I don't think they have re-opened yet. They have quite a collection.

But thanks, Sans, a lot.

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1 hour ago, laffite said:

I don't have Roku. I only have netflix and Criterion Channel. Another good source for me is the Public Library but I don't think they have re-opened yet. They have quite a collection.

But thanks, Sans, a lot.

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Roku is not a content provider. It is a media player which accesses streaming services.

How do you watch Netflix or the Criterion Channel? I believe that: "TV Time Feature Films" does not have a site and so could not be watched using a computer only. Some Smart TVs might be able to access it depending on their channels sources. XBox, Amazon Fire and similar media players may have it. You would have to check their menu of channels.

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14 minutes ago, SansFin said:

Roku is not a content provider. It is a media player which accesses streaming services.

How do you watch Netflix or the Criterion Channel? I believe that: "TV Time Feature Films" does not have a site and so could not be watched using a computer only. Some Smart TVs might be able to access it depending on their channels sources. XBox, Amazon Fire and similar media players may have it. You would have to check their menu of channels.

Oh, I see. I am not up on this. I don't have AT&T anymore but when I started with them they offered me a package with Roku. I naively thought that was something exclusive with them but I should have known better. I do remember looking it over and not being too keen with what they had to offer. But I could be off on that too. I ought to look more into some of these other services, like Amazon Prime and Hulu but I don't want to overextend myself. I get DVD Netflix, not the streaming. The Criterion Channel is streaming at $10.99 a month. I have CoxCable, including the Encore channels. Sometimes old films show up on there. What about TCM on Demand? I've never used that. I'll check it out. Sometimes we get a burning desire to see a film, and right now, ha ; I think I'm like that now. I want to check out this character, again, David Sutton. :) Thanks, again.

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On 7/22/2020 at 5:18 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

I also (vividly) recall what I wrote about Anton Walbrook in THE 49th PARALLEL. 

I have this coming soon. :)

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You might think of Roku as a second cable company.

The installation fee is to buy the device. You plug it into your television and add it to your WiFi. There are no monthly fees for Roku. Entry-level units with all you need are currently $25-$35 at Wal-Mart.

Your current CoxCable probably enters your television through an HTML port. You would use the 'Channel Up' or 'Channel Down' to switch to the HTML port into which you plugged the Roku. You would then chose the channels you wish to watch from the menu. Most of the channels are free. You can subscribe to Netflix, Hulu and many other channels but you will have to pay their monthly fees. The channels which are free to watch usually have commercials. 

You would use the channel button on your television's remote to change back to the HTML port for CoxCable.

Tubi is a channel which carries many classic movies on demand. You can stream classic television series there also. 

"TV Time' has several channels for on demand classic movies separated into genres of: Comedies, Mysteries and etc.

 

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lafitte, it's like I'm reading my work for the first time because my memory is so bad, lol.

Hate to be a downer, but I'm somewhat under the weather.  Stress-related tummy issues.  I won't elaborate in the interests of good taste.   Also, haven't been watching a lot of movies if the truth be told.   I fall asleep on my living room couch, wake up with something that might be akin to night terrors, then drift off again.  This pandemic, along with everything else going on in the country, plus my own neurotic fears and apprehensions, is sucking all the life out of me!  I want to be optimistic and cheerful, and normally nothing would lift my spirits like a bad film, particularly one in the horror or sci-fi category, along the lines of ROBOT MONSTER. 

I'm normally enthusiastic about voodoo stories involving shrunken heads so will have to look for these on YouTube.  I know they will buck me up!   

So please be patient with me.

POSSESSED has some creepy moments with Crawford hallucinating all over the place.  I'm always favorably impressed by Van Heflin.  Run hot and cold with Raymond Massey, however.

I do remember thinking that Leslie Howard and Norma Shearer looked like they could have qualified for Medicare in ROMEO AND JULIET.    

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3 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

lafitte, it's like I'm reading my work for the first time because my memory is so bad, lol.

Hate to be a downer, but I'm somewhat under the weather.  Stress-related tummy issues.  I won't elaborate in the interests of good taste.   Also, haven't been watching a lot of movies if the truth be told.   I fall asleep on my living room couch, wake up with something that might be akin to night terrors, then drift off again.  This pandemic, along with everything else going on in the country, plus my own neurotic fears and apprehensions, is sucking all the life out of me!  I want to be optimistic and cheerful, and normally nothing would lift my spirits like a bad film, particularly one in the horror or sci-fi category, along the lines of ROBOT MONSTER. 

I'm normally enthusiastic about voodoo stories involving shrunken heads so will have to look for these on YouTube.  I know they will buck me up!   

So please be patient with me.

POSSESSED has some creepy moments with Crawford hallucinating all over the place.  I'm always favorably impressed by Van Heflin.  Run hot and cold with Raymond Massey, however.

I do remember thinking that Leslie Howard and Norma Shearer looked like they could have qualified for Medicare in ROMEO AND JULIET.    

Do take care, dear Barb! Get something for that tummy. Feel better soon. We shall be patient but we want you well. You haven't lost your sense of humor, with all this talk about bad movies and shrunken heads. Too funny. Yer gonna be okay, Barb, and soon enough. Even if those predilections are pure bosh, they are still funny. You're a hoot, Barb ... with a bad tummy going on. It may be awhile before I lay hands on POSSESSED. Sansfin has been kind enough to help me with my procurement of movies of which one might have a burning desire to see, and right now. I am investigating. THE 49TH PARALLEL is number one on my list but alas, it's marked VERY LONG WAIT, drat! UP THE DOWN STAIRCASE is now in my eager hands and so I'll be in school with Sandy Dennis teacher, woo-hoo! There was a quake somewhere near Stratford but it wasn't that serious. William was turning in his grave when someone found the portal to the Other World and slipped him a vid of Leslie and Norma messing around with his play. Relax and nurture good thoughts, dear Barb, even though they might be shrunken heads and bad movies. Speaking of bad movies, click on the link below. Enjoy, and get well. We miss you already.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qiL3RDlBAxs

Jean Gabin (who says, Eh bien, Chere Barbara, je te souhait la bonne sante, et tout de suite!!!!

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Hi Barb !

We were talking about the poignancy of good ole nostalgia and I had mentioned Debussy and Ravel, whose works sometime relfect same. Here is something that is quite beautiful and has a sort of wistful and perhaps a faintly plaintive tone. It is the finale of short suite of pieces. I hope it won't sound dreary. It has a rich climax at the end. 

 

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All Through The Night (1942) Delightful watch. Those who find fault with mixing action-drama and comedy may be missing the point.  Zinger one-liners and rapid repartee (along with a little slapstick here and there) pepper this a story of a Nazi spy ring aiming to perpetrate an operation that we would call terrorism today. And yet the movie insists on poking fun ... and with success. They have the right people to do it. What a surprise to see a young Phil Silvers and a young Jackie Gleason trading barbs while Humphrey Bogart waits for his cheesecake. Would be viewers are generally pretty aware of the top-billers, but the cavalcade of recognizable others keep appearing, like Jane Darwell, Judith Anderson, Frank McHugh, William Demarest, Wallace Ford. And introducing (for me, anyway) one Kaaren [ sic ] Verne, who doesn't crack any jokes but who doesn't need to (and besides, she has enough on her mind). Love the meeting in the basement, I need to learn that language Bogie and cohort used, it might get me out of a jam sometime. The fast pace and lickity-split dialogue kept my mind glued. Enjoyed thoroughly.

Madame Bovary (1949) - A splendid adaptation of this famous story. The framing device of having the author (James Mason) clue us in is not only a good one but a necessary one. Any telling of her story that understates her early history makes her come across as just another perfidious, manipulating, and selfish woman and who might simply be taken for evil incarnate (there are adaptations extant who do this and give up to right to call their story by the title Madame Bovary). But with Emma it's innocence >>> obsession >>>disillusionment >>> etc. etc. etc. It gives us the option to understand her and perhaps view her with sympathy. Whether or not she retains this status at the end will be up to the individual viewer.

Jennifer Jones is competent (perhaps better than that). The both sides of Emma are believable. The same with Van Heflen, he makes Charles a real person and not merely a cardboard dolt. Louis Jourdain is perfectly cast as Rodolphe and for obvious reasons. All he needs to do is move and speak and he does the job. Alf Kjellen is unknown by me but was fine although Leon is generally portrayed as a younger and slightly less polished man than here. Frank Allenby as Lheureux, the money-lender is particularly good.

The vulgar depiction of the wedding reception was a little exaggerated but yet can the overkill serve as a more accurate view to what was certainly going through Emma's mind? ... Emma disdainfully looks out the window one morning and can correctly anticipate the monotony of life in Yonville (Yawnville?) ... The waltz scene is a highlight. Exhilarating for Emma who comes as close as she probably will to what she is looking for, and exhilarating for us from the point of view of good cinema. Later in the story Emma has a breakdown and her recovery stabilizes her for a time, calming her mind and keeps her far-flung aspirations at bay for awhile. But later an event occurs and the sound of the waltz returns like a leitmotif in her head and Emma dances the waltz again, whirling around solo in her room. The passion is back! ...

You know the rest and it ain't pretty.

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lafitte, first of all, that Ravel piece is so, so beautiful.  I had never heard it before.  Thank you.

You, my friend, are a very eloquent and perceptive writer.  Oh yes you are don't argue with me, lol!  I simply love your review of ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT.   Never saw that one! I think I've been consciously avoiding it for a long time, though.   As for MADAME BOVARY, I think it's one of Jennifer's best performances.  I know a few people for whom Jones is an acquired taste.   Your summary of this fine Minnelli film is excellent.  

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Here in Boca we are nervously awaiting the possible landfall of Isaisas tomorrow afternoon, recently upgraded from tropical storm to a Cat 1 hurricane.

Just another day in paradise.

Not.

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1 hour ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

lafitte, I watched ROBOT MONSTER.

And now my tummy is fine!

Thank you so much for this remedy!!

So glad you are feeling better. Ever so kind as usual, friend ; thanks. Now that you have puffed me up I may have to put up a couple more if you don't mind. I'm the damn fool who gets complemented and then opens the floodgates. Nah, I will be judicioso as I bask in the warmth of your kindness. Shortly then, a couple of mini R.

Glad you liked the music. I'm going to foist another one on you, if I so may. If you don't know, you can play a youtube musical selection, then right click on your browser icon. This will allow you to open another window and browse while the music is still playing on the earlier window. You can go back and turn off the music by holding the cursor over the main icon and see all the windows you have open, then you click on one and there you are. You may already know this.

I like Jennifer Jones. Have you seen Carrie (1952). With Olivier and Mariam Hopkins in one of her nastiest roles, and of course Miss Jones as the eponymous heroine. I think this an excellent film. Oh, not to forget Eddie Albert. He was born to play Mr Drouet, the kind of guy that's always joking; you never know if serious or not. That's Eddie. I may try a mini ramble on that if i can remember enough. I think I do. I've seen it a number of times. Have you seen this?

That's cute about Robot Monster. Who knew an old schlocker like that could be salubrious.

So glad you're better. You sound like your wonderful self again.:)

Later,

L

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On 10/7/2012 at 1:35 AM, Bronxgirl48 said:

...wait a minute, I think I know a foolproof insomnia remedy -- I'll watch a Kevin Costner movie on YouTube!

THANK YOU !!!!

I dislike him and his stupid movies. I always thought that DANCES WITH WOLVES was the worst Best Picture Award ever given. But some foundation had BRAVEHEART the winner there. I just recently watch this latter on a recommendation and so I stuck through it. O Lord!! Much to kitchy-kitchy-koo for me. I saw FIELD OF DREAMS with my mom when it first came out and hated it. I like baseball but all that syrupy goop in the movie killed me. He had Shoeless Joe Jackson batting from the wrong side of the plate. Unforgivable. I think Kevin was a Spielberg wannabe, roping in the masses with that kind of stuff. Spiel knew how to do that but Kevin did not.

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On 10/11/2012 at 4:10 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

...

So I caught BLIND ALIBI this afternoon, because who wants to pass up a chance to see Richard Dix get upstaged by RKO's answer to Rin-Tin-Tin: Ace The Wonder Dog? For unfathomable reasons, Dix (a sculptor living in Paris; already we are stretching credulity) decides to pose as visually impaired in order to retrieve some incriminating letters that would jeopardize his dear sister's reputation. These tomes are snuggly ensconced in a crate that is inexplicably on its way to (I may have missed several moments of crucial plot development because of an important phone call) an art museum. Richard enlists the aid of Ace as his seeing-eye pooch and has some silly interactions with him and the forgettable love interest. At one point she cooks him dinner, whereupon the script, in one of the many failed, awkward and embarrassing moments throughout this turkey to come off as "humorous" and "quirky", has Dix suddenly expounding on the psychological and physical effects of spinach. Richard is walking down a hall and Ace starts baring his teeth -- can Eduardo Ciannelli be far behind? ("Get that hound away from me!") Eduardo is not only a blackmailer, but he demands his 15 and 20 cents back from underlings. This is a man who wouldn't trust his own mother, and I'm convinced that if an infant was in his way, he'd throw it over a balcony. Ace isn't spared Eduardo's wrath either. There's a somewhat clever twist at the end (involving Ace) that unfortunately gives way to a happy ending.

 

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Oct 13, 2012 2:15 AM

I love to read your pans. I sometimes don't feel confident panning movies. What if everybody else in the world loves it?

Hey, I wonder if Dix watched Popeye cartoons. He knows so much about spinach, hee hee.

That's too bad we have a dog that creates a happy ending. How hackneyed can you get. I prefer my dogs like the one in High Sierra where at the end we had a true pooch fatale. What a lot of trouble he caused.

You interrupt you movies with phone calls? :P

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On 7/5/2012 at 3:19 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

I guess I'll always be a Bronx girl in my heart, even though I'm now longing to spend the rest of my days (and nights) on the Riviera...

I don't know about that. You sound more and more like a Riviera Girl to me. :D

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On 10/21/2012 at 10:45 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

So we've got roughly five minutes of Cecil Parker (who always looked about 56 years old, even when younger) in THE MAN WHO CHANGED HIS MIND, that's about all the screen time he's allotted. Cecil is the first person to give Anna Lee (not a nurse, but an actual surgeon!) warnings about going to work for Boris Karloff: "I should think twice, there's something queer about him". Anna isn't fazed: "There's always something queer about a genius". Newspaper reporter and fiance John Loder, a million times more appealing as a sexily trench coated Scotland Yard undercover detective in SABOTAGE, also joins the "stay away" chorus: "Dr. Laurence is not the sort of thing a young girl should know. He's arrived in England with a couple of monkeys and claims he's discovered the human soul". Anna is a strong, self-reliant woman, but Loder will have none of it: "I want to look after you". She has to set him straight: "I specialize in looking after myself". John gets a funny exit line (the kind Grace Kelly in REAR WINDOW just "loves"): "If the monkey's eat you, don't blame me".

You'd think Lee was visiting Castle Dracula the way her carriage driver acts: "I don't go to that door, Miss. You'll have to get off here." She's in London, for goodness sake, not the Carpathian mountains. John, of course, is not far behind. He can't leave her alone for a moment, convinced Anna is about to meet some horrible fate. He made me pine for David Manners, who of course would go the same route so to speak in protecting his sweetheart, but do it with some charm. Anna is in for an interesting evening -- she's greeted by Karloff's cynical and caustic patient/assistant, played by an excellent actor with an Ian Keith vibe, Donald Calthorp. He's in a wheelchair and hates women. Karloff appears with a cigarette dangling from his mouth. (he chain smokes throughout, because it's stressful being a misunderstood scientist) With fulsome mane, rumpled clothing and a shambling gait, Dr. Laurence immediately comes across as a nutty professor. Modesty is not one of his traits. "I'm the greatest authority on the human brain".

He confides in Anna: "I know you'll understand, even if THEY call me mad!", then demonstrates by exchanging the minds of two monkeys with different personalities. They're put under what look like hair dryers. The best parts of the story involve Dr. Laurence's transfer of John Loder's father's (Frank Cellier, another fine actor) brain with that of the crippled assistant, accompanied by witty "British" dialogue.

The most remarkable thing about this picture is that Anna Lee doesn't scream! (The only time she opens her mouth to shriek is when John Loder is being thrown off a roof) There are no Fay Wray horror-movie "female" hysterics -- how refreshing!

Boris is appropriately menacing. I wouldn't say this is his most memorable mad-scientist role. Production values are modest; the laboratory, however, could be considered stylish for the budget.

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Oct 22, 2012 8:16 AM

So much funny here, Barbara. I'll have to look out for this one. I've never even hoid of 't. I'm not terribly fascinated with type of movie but I would watch it now. I like the way you refer to other movies, the mark of true maven. and you are a maven. Thank you for this (from all your fans, and everybody else too.)

:)

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On 10/19/2012 at 9:52 PM, SansFin said:

> {quote:title=Bronxgirl48 wrote:}{quote}

> I only wish I could speak the language.

 

To do well in Odessa you should learn both Russian and Ukrainian and you must learn to read Cyrillic also.

 

> Sometimes I get very romantic about Russia -- samovars, KNIGHT WITHOUT ARMOUR, sleigh rides in the snow, lithe dancing soldiers, caviar, blinis on a lazy Sunday morning, ANASTASIA, Yul Brynner....Yul Brynner...Yul Brynner...

 

You are romantic for Tsarist Russia. We must buy you a kovsh and bundle you into a time machine. :)

 

This is Stagecoach's view of modern Odessa:

http://youtu.be/YjYaNMrXpo8

 

This is a different view which is familiar to us:

 


Wow, Sans ... cool. A true life adventure kind of thing. For a minute, I thought we were going to see The Creature from the White Lagoon. What sounds!!

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On 10/19/2012 at 9:10 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

>Bronxie, I am enjoying reading about your mutual "Odessa" connections with Sansfin! How interesting is that! :-)>

I only wish I could speak the language.Sometimes I get very romantic about Russia -- samovars, KNIGHT WITHOUT ARMOUR, sleigh rides in the snow, lithe dancing soldiers, caviar, blinis on a lazy Sunday morning, ANASTASIA, Yul Brynner....Yul Brynner...Yul Brynner...

Gosh, Barb ... Are you sure you haven't been there? Your description sounds like a travelogue. I mean, I'm really there!  I can do without Yul, though.

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53 minutes ago, laffite said:


Wow, Sans ... cool. A true life adventure kind of thing. For a minute, I thought we were going to see The Creature from the White Lagoon. What sounds!!

It is more than a sound. It is very low frequency and so travels a great distance. It goes through things. You feel it in your sleep even when you are so very far away that you can not hear it. It is constant reminder of the importance and power of the sea.

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14 minutes ago, SansFin said:

It is more than a sound. It is very low frequency and so travels a great distance. It goes through things. You feel it in your sleep even when you are so very far away that you can not hear it. It is constant reminder of the importance and power of the sea.

I don't think that Barb will mind if I reveal a comment. "It sounds like my tummy after eating a lot of dairy products." It does have a sort of tummy sound. Not that tummies can compare with the Sea :D

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Bronxgirl wrote on Oct 16 2008 : It took me about 45 minutes to actually warm up to THE MAD MISS MANTON, because initially I got impatient and was resistant to its class consciousness (i.e., the rich deserve to be punished) but then succumbed to the great Missy and Hank chemistry which is so immediately apparent. And I loved the Capra-ish scene where he's standing looking out at her bedroom window to the lighted night city below (she's in bed with a sleep mask on, smoking a cigarette, somehow this is romantic and erotic at the same time) and then she stands with him, and they reveal their vulnerabilities. A beautiful moment. I also enjoyed her gaggle of girlfriends as they gang up on him, lol, and follow her wherever she goes, trying to find clues and solve the mystery. I'm amazed at how funny Fonda really was in comedy; the hospital bit where he's "dying", is priceless! Hattie was a scream! But unfortunately I fell asleep during the last 20 minutes, darn it!!

[just watched this am, BarbaraS day]

I, too, had a hard time warming up but my mind was not so interestingly caught up with class consciousness, I think I was more afflicted with crass weariness. As you said, Barb, the rapprochement was "immediately apparent" but it was slow in getting hot and never did achieve true sappiness (shucks!)  I love that gaggle of ladies. They ought initiate the Mad Manton All-Girl Detective Agency. I might even commit a crime if they're on the case.

A screwball comedy (of sorts) with a tinge of noir.

CSUIhvk.jpg

This may be the beginning of the scene a la Capra. He doesn't look too lyrical at this point.

In the last 20 minutes, they get Miss Manton to serve as a decoy to trap the killer, who turned out to be the ex-con. Her life is threatened the latter **** he engages her in her apartment where she is hiding but without all the police protection she had been afforded. But our hero barges in and together they confront the bad guy. An ambush had planned out beforehand and the ex-con was shot dead. Game over. Hero and Heroine plan to get married that very day and go to South America for six months, but not before they exchange word on whose income they are going to live on. The last shot is the police chief who laments having to take another bicarb pill..

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"Thats the girl I'm going to marry."

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