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BRONXGIRL'S MOTHER, HENRY FONDA'S HIRSUTENESS, ETC.


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Hello, please indulge me this. These have not posted anywhere, save for the last one, I think. I am thrusting this upon you and thanks for reading. I seek nothing except that they see the light of day, thanks for letting me push them. Has anyone seen these?

The Barbarian (1932) Myrna Loy, as a high-born English lady (Diana Standing) traveling in Egypt. She spends a good deal of time staving of the cheeky advances of their dragoman named Jamil (Ramon Novarro), who plays an Arab. She remains aloof and strikes back like a hissing cat. The two of them get stranded in the desert at one point and he exacts some minor revenge in a quite stark erotic scene where she is relegated to minor status. Treatment like this has been seen before, but hey, Miss Standing is a lady. Their are hints of  Swept Away here but, rest assured, only minutely.  Loy is on the whole rather feisty and self-assured in the role. Edward Arnold is faintly ridiculous as Pasha, a rich Arab landowner who is also after Loy. He gets nowhere. As far as any serious rapprochement between Miss Standing and Jamil might occur, the movie covers its tracks by making it clearly understood that Diana Standing's mother is Egyptian.  Some fine desert scenery.

Pretty Poison (1968) - I got this one for Tuesday. No, no, I had a lot to do on Tuesday, I mean ... I got it  for Weld. I was curious to see her in the embodiment of something other than Thalia Menninger. Thalia was cute and this new embodiment doesn't disappoint on that score; as to other things, well ... She was the pretty poison though you wouldn't know it at first. This thing was boring me no end and I was thinking that it was just some bomb that one never talks about blah blah blah. Then the bomb hit, the big shift in the middle when something happens that changes everything. I didn't know anything about this and I thought I was watching a budding romantic comedy complete with pretty poison but it turned out to be a thriller of sorts, a weird one. Tuesday's acting gets better in the after part of the film. She can really put on a nasty face when she is being, well, nasty. As to Anthony Perkins, it was interesting to see him be real after all that nonsense at the beginning. So it turned out rather entertaining, one of the biggest turn-arounds I know in a film. They nearly waited to long to make it happen. They almost lost me.

Tulip Fever (2017) A love story (actually two of them) play out amid the backdrop of the famous tulip mania of Amsterdam, ca 1634. Both love stories hinge on wild improbabilities that are almost laughable. The story is based on a novel so we can perhaps blame it on that. Regardless, the movie is vastly entertaining. As we are told Tulip trading was rampant and "fortunes were won and lost" all because of a "beautiful flower."

Sophia (Alicia Vikander) is an orphan under the care of a convent that specializes in providing care and education for such unfortunates. She is appropriated by a wealthy nobleman (Cornelius Sandvoort) in Amsterdam who wants to marry and sire an heir. She fails but Cornelius turns out to be a saint, an anomaly for one so powerful in such times. He has a love for his young wife and by and by he hires a handsome young painter (Dane DeHann, (who bears a rather strong resemblance to a young Leonardo DeCaprio) to paint a portrait of he and his wife. Uh oh.

Meanwhile Sophia's servant, Maria (Holliday Grainger) is carrying on with a fishmonger (James Dryden), who wants to marry her and due to his low station tries to strike it rich with tulips. Complications ensue whereby Sophia and Maria concoct a scheme which might be termed the Mission Impossible of 1634 that strains credulity but can be overlooked with effort. Alica Vikander, the main heroine, agrees to some clandestine sittings for her young painter and in the doing is mind-stopping beautiful. (Vermeer would have loved her. She would not need golden earrings, e.g.) What happens besides sitting and painting in these sessions is easily surmised.

Judi Dench is the Mother Superior but not per the usual, she is capable of the nod and the wink and can speak quite plainly not to mention her business acumen. You see, the convent grows, buys, and sells tulips and they need a shrewd one to handle all that ... Judi does just this with aplomb all the while maintaining at least an appearance of piety. (Although she actually hits somebody over the head with a club).

Another character is old Amsterdam, or the depiction of it. Swarming denizens bustle about in droves along streets and waterfront fulfilling the need for historical context (along with the tulips, of course).

''''

 

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On 7/31/2020 at 8:14 PM, laffite said:

So glad you are feeling better. Ever so kind as usual, friend ; thanks. Now that you have puffed me up I may have to put up a couple more if you don't mind. I'm the damn fool who gets complemented and then opens the floodgates. Nah, I will be judicioso as I bask in the warmth of your kindness. Shortly then, a couple of mini R.

Glad you liked the music. I'm going to foist another one on you, if I so may. If you don't know, you can play a youtube musical selection, then right click on your browser icon. This will allow you to open another window and browse while the music is still playing on the earlier window. You can go back and turn off the music by holding the cursor over the main icon and see all the windows you have open, then you click on one and there you are. You may already know this.

I like Jennifer Jones. Have you seen Carrie (1952). With Olivier and Mariam Hopkins in one of her nastiest roles, and of course Miss Jones as the eponymous heroine. I think this an excellent film. Oh, not to forget Eddie Albert. He was born to play Mr Drouet, the kind of guy that's always joking; you never know if serious or not. That's Eddie. I may try a mini ramble on that if i can remember enough. I think I do. I've seen it a number of times. Have you seen this?

That's cute about Robot Monster. Who knew an old schlocker like that could be salubrious.

So glad you're better. You sound like your wonderful self again.:)

Later,

L

///

 

 

The more music the better!  Soothes my soul...

You know, I saw CARRIE eons ago and remember thinking it was one of Olivier's best performances (along with SPARTACUS and BUNNY LAKE IS MISSING -- Larry is best when uncharacteristically underplaying) but my memory retrieval is shaky on the film in its entirety.   If you find your comments, please post them either here or Rambles II.

Well, Florida dodged a bullet with Isaias.

But it's only August.

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On 7/31/2020 at 10:04 PM, laffite said:

THANK YOU !!!!

I dislike him and his stupid movies. I always thought that DANCES WITH WOLVES was the worst Best Picture Award ever given. But some foundation had BRAVEHEART the winner there. I just recently watch this latter on a recommendation and so I stuck through it. O Lord!! Much to kitchy-kitchy-koo for me. I saw FIELD OF DREAMS with my mom when it first came out and hated it. I like baseball but all that syrupy goop in the movie killed me. He had Shoeless Joe Jackson batting from the wrong side of the plate. Unforgivable. I think Kevin was a Spielberg wannabe, roping in the masses with that kind of stuff. Spiel knew how to do that but Kevin did not.

///

He's  just a non-entity to me.

Hilarious the way some people compare Kevin to Gary Cooper.

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On 7/27/2020 at 12:19 AM, laffite said:

I have this coming soon. :)

You mean my comments comparing Walbrook's performance(s) with a certain German dictator? Uh-oh!  (it's okay, lol)

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On 7/31/2020 at 10:15 PM, laffite said:

I love to read your pans. I sometimes don't feel confident panning movies. What if everybody else in the world loves it?

Hey, I wonder if Dix watched Popeye cartoons. He knows so much about spinach, hee hee.

That's too bad we have a dog that creates a happy ending. How hackneyed can you get. I prefer my dogs like the one in High Sierra where at the end we had a true pooch fatale. What a lot of trouble he caused.

You interrupt you movies with phone calls? :P

///

I do enjoy a lousy movie.  Watched a bit of one very late last night -- never heard of it, either -- something called THE WRATH OF GOD, (last of the Rita Hayworth SUTS line-up).  1972 I believe.  A prune-like Robert Mitchum masquerading as some priest.  South American "shenanigans".  Of-the-times sex and violence.  I kept waiting for Eli Wallach to show up in a Frito Bandito moustache.

I used to confuse Richard Dix with Chester Morris.  Both had that same "American" square jaw.

"Pard" was so sweet in HIGH SIERRA, like the doggie in JOHNNY EAGER, both there to make the (anti) hero more "conventionally" human.

I have a dear friend who always feels slighted if I don't respond to her immediately, so a few films have gone by the wayside...

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On 7/31/2020 at 10:21 PM, laffite said:

I don't know about that. You sound more and more like a Riviera Girl to me. :D

By way of Fordham Road.

The Bronx never gets any love in movies!  Always Brooklyn, Brooklyn, Brooklyn!  

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19 hours ago, laffite said:

Hello, please indulge me this. These have not posted anywhere, save for the last one, I think. I am thrusting this upon you and thanks for reading. I seek nothing except that they see the light of day, thanks for letting me push them. Has anyone seen these?

The Barbarian (1932) Myrna Loy, as a high-born English lady (Diana Standing) traveling in Egypt. She spends a good deal of time staving of the cheeky advances of their dragoman named Jamil (Ramon Novarro), who plays an Arab. She remains aloof and strikes back like a hissing cat. The two of them get stranded in the desert at one point and he exacts some minor revenge in a quite stark erotic scene where she is relegated to minor status. Treatment like this has been seen before, but hey, Miss Standing is a lady. Their are hints of  Swept Away here but, rest assured, only minutely.  Loy is on the whole rather feisty and self-assured in the role. Edward Arnold is faintly ridiculous as Pasha, a rich Arab landowner who is also after Loy. He gets nowhere. As far as any serious rapprochement between Miss Standing and Jamil might occur, the movie covers its tracks by making it clearly understood that Diana Standing's mother is Egyptian.  Some fine desert scenery.

Pretty Poison (1968) - I got this one for Tuesday. No, no, I had a lot to do on Tuesday, I mean ... I got it  for Weld. I was curious to see her in the embodiment of something other than Thalia Menninger. Thalia was cute and this new embodiment doesn't disappoint on that score; as to other things, well ... She was the pretty poison though you wouldn't know it at first. This thing was boring me no end and I was thinking that it was just some bomb that one never talks about blah blah blah. Then the bomb hit, the big shift in the middle when something happens that changes everything. I didn't know anything about this and I thought I was watching a budding romantic comedy complete with pretty poison but it turned out to be a thriller of sorts, a weird one. Tuesday's acting gets better in the after part of the film. She can really put on a nasty face when she is being, well, nasty. As to Anthony Perkins, it was interesting to see him be real after all that nonsense at the beginning. So it turned out rather entertaining, one of the biggest turn-arounds I know in a film. They nearly waited to long to make it happen. They almost lost me.

Tulip Fever (2017) A love story (actually two of them) play out amid the backdrop of the famous tulip mania of Amsterdam, ca 1634. Both love stories hinge on wild improbabilities that are almost laughable. The story is based on a novel so we can perhaps blame it on that. Regardless, the movie is vastly entertaining. As we are told Tulip trading was rampant and "fortunes were won and lost" all because of a "beautiful flower."

 

Sophia (Alicia Vikander) is an orphan under the care of a convent that specializes in providing care and education for such unfortunates. She is appropriated by a wealthy nobleman (Cornelius Sandvoort) in Amsterdam who wants to marry and sire an heir. She fails but Cornelius turns out to be a saint, an anomaly for one so powerful in such times. He has a love for his young wife and by and by he hires a handsome young painter (Dane DeHann, (who bears a rather strong resemblance to a young Leonardo DeCaprio) to paint a portrait of he and his wife. Uh oh.

 

Meanwhile Sophia's servant, Maria (Holliday Grainger) is carrying on with a fishmonger (James Dryden), who wants to marry her and due to his low station tries to strike it rich with tulips. Complications ensue whereby Sophia and Maria concoct a scheme which might be termed the Mission Impossible of 1634 that strains credulity but can be overlooked with effort. Alica Vikander, the main heroine, agrees to some clandestine sittings for her young painter and in the doing is mind-stopping beautiful. (Vermeer would have loved her. She would not need golden earrings, e.g.) What happens besides sitting and painting in these sessions is easily surmised.

 

Judi Dench is the Mother Superior but not per the usual, she is capable of the nod and the wink and can speak quite plainly not to mention her business acumen. You see, the convent grows, buys, and sells tulips and they need a shrewd one to handle all that ... Judi does just this with aplomb all the while maintaining at least an appearance of piety. (Although she actually hits somebody over the head with a club).

 

Another character is old Amsterdam, or the depiction of it. Swarming denizens bustle about in droves along streets and waterfront fulfilling the need for historical context (along with the tulips, of course).

 

''''

 

 

Isn't THE BARBARIAN a remake of Valentino's SON OF THE SHEIK?  Ramon Navarro was no Rudy!

TULIP FEVER almost sounds like a parody of some type, lol.  1634 Amsterdam?  A swingin' place!

Tuesday Weld!  First saw her as Danny Kaye's crippled daughter in THE FIVE PENNIES.  She evolved in my eyes into a pretty interestingly "mannered" and "cultish" actress.  Catch her in LORD LOVE A DUCK.

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On 8/1/2020 at 3:31 PM, laffite said:

Gosh, Barb ... Are you sure you haven't been there? Your description sounds like a travelogue. I mean, I'm really there!  I can do without Yul, though.

I don't know why I romanticize Tsarist Russia.

My Russian grandmother wouldn't even talk about what she went through with the Cossacks.

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On 8/1/2020 at 4:33 PM, laffite said:

I don't think that Barb will mind if I reveal a comment. "It sounds like my tummy after eating a lot of dairy products." It does have a sort of tummy sound. Not that tummies can compare with the Sea :D

I'm lacto intolerant (yogurt and milk)  Cheese is fine, which I'm grateful for because I could never live without pizza.

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On 7/25/2020 at 3:36 PM, laffite said:

I was flabbergasted when I saw Andy in A FACE IN THE CROWD. I didn't know he could act like that. He seemed a natural. It was so long ago. I remember thinking, what happened. I mean did he ever equal that? I remember reading that he did not like drama, or something. Here is an unpleasant disclosure, hee ... I remember laughing my rear off when I first saw DON'T GO NEAR THE WATER and in the theater when if first came out! But it seemed to me he could have had a better career with than innate talent.

Not a Dick Powell fan, but he is good nonetheless. The early singing made me wince, that high pitched syrupy sweet sound assailing my ears. Oooouieeee. Some grain of pseudo-macho made me see him as a sissy. But of course I am so mature now ... I couldn't think that now. (think: mature = old) But I will look for those titles you mentioned. Now that I have TCM again.You had mentioned on the R2 thread that you preferred ALGIERS over PEPE LE MOKO and I agree. Hedy Lamarr DID have a rep for decidedly un-stellar acting chops. But whatever her faults, the vacuous look or whatever, served her well in ALGIERS. She was relatively non-emotive (I seem to remember) while listening and talking to M. Boyer about Paris  They made Paris sound so good within that confining labyrinth.  Looking so serenely beautiful was enough for her, or a good deal of enough.
So ... why don't says something about Merle Oberon's Kathy now? Seriously, I would love to hear your take. I don't remember anything to wrong with her but the movie is not fresh in mind. But I sort of get your point, that "icy" quality. After reading your review of this Kathy, delighted to have a champion in Heathcliff to entertain her whims, Merle doesn't seem right at all. Now you make me want to watch it again through your eyes. You're a game changer, Barb. In fact. Your reviews are so trenchant, I am drawn to  watch them.

///

 

 

Was Andy in DON'T GO NEAR THE WATER?  (I read that at first as DON'T DRINK THE WATER, which I think is an unfortunate Jackie Gleason "comedy").  Yes, flabbergasted is the right word to describe Griffith's fabulously unsettling A FACE IN THE CROWD performance.   I feel the same way about Robert Walker's Bruno in STRANGERS ON A TRAIN.  Of course, we know that Bob could deliver straight drama, a la THE CLOCK, whereas there seems to be no precedent for Andy's Lonesome Roads. (that anyone knows about, that is)  I believe he, like Fred MacMurray, made the decision to "go back to" more benign roles as their fans would not accept them as villainous characters.  (Hence MacMurray w/Disney and Griffith as the Mayberry sheriff).

Dick Powell had a face like Henry in the cartoons.  Baby-ish but weird, lol.  Never appealed to me in any romantic way.  My favorite Powell movies are IT HAPPENED TOMORROW, SUSAN SLEPT HERE and YOU NEVER CAN TELL.  

I'll have to check out what I wrote about ALGIERS vs. PEPE LE MOKO.  Hedy and Charles do make a soulful pair.

As for Merle Oberon, the iciness serves her well in A SONG TO REMEMBER.  

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On 8/18/2012 at 6:49 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

[ ...]

Leslie! Leslie! You know that Myrna Loy tribute by Julianne Moore? The more I read about his quirks, I'm going, "He had agoraphobia? Me too! He was a hypochondriac? Me too!" THE 49th PARALLEL -- this time around I actually found Larry quite endearing as a French-Canadian, warbling "Alouette", saying things to Nazi Eric Portman like "My fadder, he fought you in the first war. We licked you then and by golly, we do it again!" He also looks so cute in his lumberman shirt, lol. His fate was quite poignant to me. I didn't think I would have this reaction. I couldn't quite figure out the tone of 49TH PARALLEL; of course it's a propaganda film but it also exhibits a fair amount of offbeat drollery. Niall MacGinness is sympathetic, although Portman still terrifies me with his lemon face, even if I suspect that his rather one-note ruthlessness might be a "playful" stylistic P&P device. Anton always startles me as Peter, because even when delivering his unforgettable "We are not your brothers" speech, his usual clipped, hissing delivery sounds so menacing, lol, almost counter-productive. I love the panoramic cinematography; the opening musical theme is somberly, hauntingly beautiful. I kind of enjoy the episodic nature of the story, with all the carefully constructed star-cameo vignettes, not the least of which is Leslie as Philip Armstrong Scott. (isn't that a perfect Leslie Howard screen name?) It's almost as though he ambled off the PETRIFIED FOREST set and then somehow took a rowboat to Canada, lol, settling into his art and book filled tepee to match wits with the Nazis. (no contest) He's his usual deceptively unassuming self, tossing off ironic witticisms and intellectual musings, all the better to catch the enemy off guard and show them what he's really made of. Parts of the movie reminded me of Hitchcock and also Fritz Lang.

Hold on, let me get some coffee and I'll be back with PIMPERNEL SMITH.

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Aug 19, 2012 2:35 AM

Hi Barb, I thought I had posted your remarks on The 49th Parallel but I checked our recent posts in this thread and I don't see it. But I had made a note of it so I knew where to find it.  I said it was "coming soon" but that was before I noticed that there it is designated as a VERY LONG WAIT and they usually mean it (Netflix). Now here is your Pimpernel Smith as you promised, Barb. Did you get your coffee yet? (Barb, you said somewhere that you drank a lot of coffee at work, all day long in fact. You said you got a lot ofwork done, but they had to "peel me off the wall" at the end of the day. :lol:

Quote

I'm adoring Leslie in PIMPERNEL SMITH, it's now my favorite LH movie, even above TSP! As an "absent-minded" archeology professor, (thankfully nothing like Danny Kaye in MERRY ANDREW, ha!) his Horatio Smith, like Sir Percy, wears the "mask" of a harmless, self-involved eccentric in order to better facilitate his underground heroism, although it's obvious Smith is an odd, socially awkward duck to begin with. This updating of the original story is brilliant, and Leslie is...just...so...WONDERFUL, donning sly disguises, playing cat-and-mouse with burly Francis L. Sullivan (again, no contest, lol), tentatively drawn to an apparent Nazi agent

(Mary Morris, whose face I was having trouble recognizing until it finally dawned on me in shock -- she plays the scary mechanical toy with all the arms, who gives Miles Malleson some interesting loving, lol, in THE THIEF OF BAGDAD. Eeeek!!!) and in general catching enemies off-guard with his charmingly tweedy academic befuddlement. There is one disguise that is so deliciously picturesque, it reminded me of the Disney version of DR. SYN.

 

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Aug 19, 2012 2:33 AM

I haven't seen this one either. Waah. But I write these ones down anyway. Maybe they'll turn up. I am always impressed with the way you refer to other movies. My catalogue of seen movies is as thin as a paper towel, so I can't do that. Waaah.

//

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Aw shucks, I see now that I did post your comments on the 49th parallel. Oh well, I wanted to read it twice anyhow. It's fit for an encore. And it's a good lead-in to Pimpernel. It's all cool. :D

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1 hour ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

By way of Fordham Road.

The Bronx never gets any love in movies!  Always Brooklyn, Brooklyn, Brooklyn!  

I lived in NYC for three years in the 80s. Staten Island. My friend Valeria and I were staunch Yankee fans and we made several trip to Yankee Stadium. I think I made only two trips to Brooklyn. Well, at least the Bronx had a great zoo. So I hear. Isn't the zoo a feather in the cap of any Bronxite? Well, at least the Yankees were piling up World Series championships before the Dodgers won their first and only while in Brooklyn (against the Yankees though).

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1 hour ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Was Andy in DON'T GO NEAR THE WATER?  (I read that at first as DON'T DRINK THE WATER, which I think is an unfortunate Jackie Gleason "comedy").  Yes, flabbergasted is the right word to describe Griffith's fabulously unsettling A FACE IN THE CROWD performance.   I feel the same way about Robert Walker's Bruno in STRANGERS ON A TRAIN.  Of course, we know that Bob could deliver straight drama, a la THE CLOCK, whereas there seems to be no precedent for Andy's Lonesome Roads. (that anyone knows about, that is)  I believe he, like Fred MacMurray, made the decision to "go back to" more benign roles as their fans would not accept them as villainous characters.  (Hence MacMurray w/Disney and Griffith as the Mayberry sheriff).

Dick Powell had a face like Henry in the cartoons.  Baby-ish but weird, lol.  Never appealed to me in any romantic way.  My favorite Powell movies are IT HAPPENED TOMORROW, SUSAN SLEPT HERE and YOU NEVER CAN TELL.  

I'll have to check out what I wrote about ALGIERS vs. PEPE LE MOKO.  Hedy and Charles do make a soulful pair.

As for Merle Oberon, the iciness serves her well in A SONG TO REMEMBER.  

NO TIME FOR SARGENTS  is what I thinking. He played the back country, hopelessly naive, mostly downright silly, private in the Army. Strong enough to bear a tank on his back. I saw that as a kid in the theater and did I laugh. Oouuieeee! I understand his desire (along with Fred's) that he wanted to play good guys, but did he ever play a good guy in a stark dramatic roleJ He certainly could have. I think he did but I cannot recall it.

Oh ... I thought you liked Dick Powell. Saying, "How much is Dick Powell in the window?" sounds affectionate, like you wanted to take him home. I guess it was contextual, the movie with a woman in the window. That would be my cue :D.

That was a terrific observation about THE MAD MISS MANTON being made in 1938 with all that noir. It wasn't just a scene or two. Remember the opening with the flashlight, and later many scenes with the shadows and light beams. I wonder what the noir freaks over the Alley would think of that. They probably already know it. I think it's amazing. It was actually more than just a tinge, photography wise.

//

 

 

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1 hour ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

I'm lacto intolerant (yogurt and milk)  Cheese is fine, which I'm grateful for because I could never live without pizza.

Do you remember those three slices of pizza I sent you (Rohanaka style) from Bronx Pizza right here in sunny Cal. A loooooong time ago, that was. It's still there and all the same people are working there. My fave pizza stop in NYC was Ray's Pizza (the definitive one, I think) on 14th Street. They sold mostly by the slice and and they would throw the bills against the wall. There was no time to ring anything up. Gobs and gobs of cheese. I can almost taste it now.

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2 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Isn't THE BARBARIAN a remake of Valentino's SON OF THE SHEIK?  Ramon Navarro was no Rudy!

TULIP FEVER almost sounds like a parody of some type, lol.  1634 Amsterdam?  A swingin' place!

Tuesday Weld!  First saw her as Danny Kaye's crippled daughter in THE FIVE PENNIES.  She evolved in my eyes into a pretty interestingly "mannered" and "cultish" actress.  Catch her in LORD LOVE A DUCK.

Here's what Wikipedia says, "The Barbarian, also known as A Night in Cairo, is a 1933 American pre-Code romance drama film produced and directed by Sam Wood and starring Ramon Novarro and Myrna Loy. Written by Elmer Harris and Anita Loos, and based on the play The Arab by Edgar Selwyn, the film is about an American woman tourist in Egypt who has several suitors, among them an Arab guide who is more than he seems. The film was released on May 12, 1933 in the United States by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. The play had been filmed previously by MGM as The Arab (1924) with Novarro and Alice Terry." I checked SON OF THE SHEIK and there was no info there either. But you still may be right. I didn't do an exhaustive search.

I don't usually catch the girl but I'll try to find Lord love a Duck.

///

 

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7 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

You know, I saw CARRIE eons ago and remember thinking it was one of Olivier's best performances (along with SPARTACUS and BUNNY LAKE IS MISSING -- Larry is best when uncharacteristically underplaying) but my memory retrieval is shaky on the film in its entirety.   If you find your comments, please post them either here or Rambles II.

He WAS sort of subdued, make no mistake. Almost to a fault, I remember thinking. When he wooing Jennifer he spoke, not with the normal fever-pitched enthusiasm as is the custom, but with a low monotone. I thought at the time that there was an element of creepy there. You may know already (I have mentioned this a billion times on the board) that, according to a biography, Oliver was much more comfortable with the elaborate makeup and costume as in Shakespeare and other Classical stuff because it was easier to inhabit the role, he was spurred on by a mere garb. Conversely, he struggled with a business suit. Now he has to act like everyone else. I don't necessarily think that he was afflicted with the disadvantage in CARRIE but he might have been. He pled to her to be loved by her almost like begging. Ouch? But he was desperate.

You remember George Hurstwood was a host and manager of a highly popular bar and grill sort of place but with a nice dining room adjoining. He played if not happy at least contented but inside he was dying. Married to a shrew (Mariam Hopkins, at her her absolute best worst) with two children that he cannot connect with.

You probably remember too that this is based on SISTER CARRIE by Theodore Drieser and takes place in about 1900. Carrie leaves her home in Podunk for Chicago (?) and runs into trouble fast. She can't find a job and her sister wants her to leave the abode and "go back home." She chanced on meeting a man named Mr Drouet (Eddie Albert) on the train coming in he notices her at the club. And she gets a little money from him. Later she is kept by him. One day she sees a little girl down the hall, "What is your name?" "My mommy says I can't talk to you." Carrie is mortified and though she does not love him pleads with Drouet to marry her. She wants respectability. He puts her off and is often out of town for short time. Drout had invited Hurstwood to his apartment and the latter met Carrie. When Drouet is away Hurstwood takes her to the theater. Upon return of the coach in front of Carrie's abode, she descends. He takes her hand as she pulls away. He says, "Don't leave me." "I must," she says and we see her walking away with a still camera as she cross the street and up the stoop. We are looking through Hurstwood's eyes. Pretty good, right there.

Eddie Albert is brilliant. He's playing himself in a way or at least a persona he is entirely adept at. Always, laughing, always happy-go-lucky, quizzical facial expressions, everything out of his mouth is a joke. You can never tell if he is serious or not. People like this can drive you nuts. Others can do that but Eddie is perfect. No wonder poor Carrie is confused.

Please don't read what follows, it may reveal too much about the story:

Hurstwood gets desperate and embezzles $10,000 from the club and shamelessly pulls a dirty trick on Carrie, getting her on a train on false pretenses and then having to admit that he virtually "kidnapped" her. It's not real kidnapping. He will let her off whenever she wants but she must hear him out. He wants to marry her and start a new life. He does show emotion here. And even more when he tells his wife, "I have never experienced love and I want to now." a confession that he is leaving her. He rushes out of the house and we seeing him sprinting down the street without knowing what he is doing. Out of it. 

Much more stuff happens.

This might be a hard find. Not sure if TCM has ever aired it. I have a copy that I have not looked at recently. I bought it online. Have you ever bought DVD movies on eBay? Good deals there. 

///

 

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On 8/4/2020 at 2:05 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

TULIP FEVER almost sounds like a parody of some type, lol.  1634 Amsterdam?  A swingin' place!

 

It truly was in many ways. The Dutch were finally out from under the control of Spain. This freedom and the wealth brought in by the Dutch East India Company loosened traditional morals in many ways. The Dutch had a more casual view of prostitution than was common in most of Europe and travelers to Amsterdam often saw it as a completely immoral city.

It retains vestiges of that to this day because of its open drug use and dangerously freaky nightlife. 

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On 8/4/2020 at 8:08 PM, laffite said:

He WAS sort of subdued, make no mistake. Almost to a fault, I remember thinking. When he wooing Jennifer he spoke, not with the normal fever-pitched enthusiasm as is the custom, but with a low monotone. I thought at the time that there was an element of creepy there. You may know already (I have mentioned this a billion times on the board) that, according to a biography, Oliver was much more comfortable with the elaborate makeup and costume as in Shakespeare and other Classical stuff because it was easier to inhabit the role, he was spurred on by a mere garb. Conversely, he struggled with a business suit. Now he has to act like everyone else. I don't necessarily think that he was afflicted with the disadvantage in CARRIE but he might have been. He pled to her to be loved by her almost like begging. Ouch? But he was desperate.

You remember George Hurstwood was a host and manager of a highly popular bar and grill sort of place but with a nice dining room adjoining. He played if not happy at least contented but inside he was dying. Married to a shrew (Mariam Hopkins, at her her absolute best worst) with two children that he cannot connect with.

You probably remember too that this is based on SISTER CARRIE by Theodore Drieser and takes place in about 1900. Carrie leaves her home in Podunk for Chicago (?) and runs into trouble fast. She can't find a job and her sister wants her to leave the abode and "go back home." She chanced on meeting a man named Mr Drouet (Eddie Albert) on the train coming in he notices her at the club. And she gets a little money from him. Later she is kept by him. One day she sees a little girl down the hall, "What is your name?" "My mommy says I can't talk to you." Carrie is mortified and though she does not love him pleads with Drouet to marry her. She wants respectability. He puts her off and is often out of town for short time. Drout had invited Hurstwood to his apartment and the latter met Carrie. When Drouet is away Hurstwood takes her to the theater. Upon return of the coach in front of Carrie's abode, she descends. He takes her hand as she pulls away. He says, "Don't leave me." "I must," she says and we see her walking away with a still camera as she cross the street and up the stoop. We are looking through Hurstwood's eyes. Pretty good, right there.

Eddie Albert is brilliant. He's playing himself in a way or at least a persona he is entirely adept at. Always, laughing, always happy-go-lucky, quizzical facial expressions, everything out of his mouth is a joke. You can never tell if he is serious or not. People like this can drive you nuts. Others can do that but Eddie is perfect. No wonder poor Carrie is confused.

Please don't read what follows, it may reveal too much about the story:

 

  Hide contents

 

Hurstwood gets desperate and embezzles $10,000 from the club and shamelessly pulls a dirty trick on Carrie, getting her on a train on false pretenses and then having to admit that he virtually "kidnapped" her. It's not real kidnapping. He will let her off whenever she wants but she must hear him out. He wants to marry her and start a new life. He does show emotion here. And even more when he tells his wife, "I have never experienced love and I want to now." a confession that he is leaving her. He rushes out of the house and we seeing him sprinting down the street without knowing what he is doing. Out of it. 

Much more stuff happens.

This might be a hard find. Not sure if TCM has ever aired it. I have a copy that I have not looked at recently. I bought it online. Have you ever bought DVD movies on eBay? Good deals there. 

///

 

Oooh, I want to see this again from start to finish RIGHT NOW, lafitte.  You're so whetting my appetite.   I didn't even remember Miriam Hopkins being in it! (and she's a favorite of mine)

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On 8/4/2020 at 5:27 PM, laffite said:

Here's what Wikipedia says, "The Barbarian, also known as A Night in Cairo, is a 1933 American pre-Code romance drama film produced and directed by Sam Wood and starring Ramon Novarro and Myrna Loy. Written by Elmer Harris and Anita Loos, and based on the play The Arab by Edgar Selwyn, the film is about an American woman tourist in Egypt who has several suitors, among them an Arab guide who is more than he seems. The film was released on May 12, 1933 in the United States by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. The play had been filmed previously by MGM as The Arab (1924) with Novarro and Alice Terry." I checked SON OF THE SHEIK and there was no info there either. But you still may be right. I didn't do an exhaustive search.

I don't usually catch the girl but I'll try to find Lord love a Duck.

///

 

I'm going to check further to see if there is really a Valentino connection with THE BARBARIAN.

Tuesday Weld is memorable in LORD LOVE A DUCK.  As is the sweater-buying scene with her father.  (it's, um, rather perverse....)

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