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BRONXGIRL'S MOTHER, HENRY FONDA'S HIRSUTENESS, ETC.


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On 8/4/2020 at 4:11 PM, laffite said:

I lived in NYC for three years in the 80s. Staten Island. My friend Valeria and I were staunch Yankee fans and we made several trip to Yankee Stadium. I think I made only two trips to Brooklyn. Well, at least the Bronx had a great zoo. So I hear. Isn't the zoo a feather in the cap of any Bronxite? Well, at least the Yankees were piling up World Series championships before the Dodgers won their first and only while in Brooklyn (against the Yankees though).

Yep, we've got the Bronx Zoo, which shows up as a weekly series on Animal Planet.  Take that, Brooklyn, lol!

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On 8/4/2020 at 5:11 PM, laffite said:

Do you remember those three slices of pizza I sent you (Rohanaka style) from Bronx Pizza right here in sunny Cal. A loooooong time ago, that was. It's still there and all the same people are working there. My fave pizza stop in NYC was Ray's Pizza (the definitive one, I think) on 14th Street. They sold mostly by the slice and and they would throw the bills against the wall. There was no time to ring anything up. Gobs and gobs of cheese. I can almost taste it now.

I remember!    

I used to eat at Ray's for "a slice" and they did pile on the cheese -- but I have to say that the best NYC pizza, imo, was John's in the Village.   Sublime.  Wonder if they're still there...

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4 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

I remember!    

I used to eat at Ray's for "a slice" and they did pile on the cheese -- but I have to say that the best NYC pizza, imo, was John's in the Village.   Sublime.  Wonder if they're still there...

I remember John's too. That was a walk in and dine place, wasn't it? I don't remember ever going there ☹️

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On 8/7/2020 at 5:08 PM, laffite said:

I remember John's too. That was a walk in and dine place, wasn't it? I don't remember ever going there ☹️

Yep.  On Bleeker Street.   

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On 8/7/2020 at 5:07 PM, laffite said:

O boy!

I'll just say that Max Showalter's infamous corny chuckle has never been used to a more unsavory degree, lol.

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l71FAJr.jpg

I’m so worried about you. I’m sick inside, if only it were only tomorrow at this time. Never mind, just meet me tomorrow at Palis Verdez. Anna nods; remember Steve, we will have it and it will be the way it was, we’ll forget the past. She  walks in “the old place” and downstairs, live band, Latin rhythms.

There she is Mr Dundee? (DanD) Where have you been Anna? Outside, in the parking lot. Can’t you get the waiter to do all that? Leave me alone.

What are you getting’ an earful about? Just standing here, boss. Get out of here. Yes, Mr Dundee. Thank you, Mr Dundee. This rotten kind of work, the rotten people you have to work with.

Lieutenant Pete and friend stops Steve (Burt) on the way in to The Round Up, “the ole place”. This way isn’t for you, Steve. Turn around and walk out. You weren’t invited. You go in there and trouble. The way you know everything, leave me alone. It ain’t for you, I tell ya. Yeah, tell me, the way you got it all figured out, bah. Steve goes to the back room. Take the girls to the powder room, Harriet. Hello Stevie, glad you were able to make it.

Back at the bar, an Eve Arden lookalike but without the quips on the end barstool is afraid of trouble. I don’t butt in, says the bartender. Hey, Pete, I thought Steve was a friend of yours. To hell with it, I give it up. The waiter in Pete’s ear, he’s gotta knife, that Dundee, here’s your chance, Lieutenant. Pete follows through the crowd. He opens the door just as the music number ends. Clapping subsides. Then taut silence. Suddenly a crash of glass.  The knife clatters to the floor. Dundee: Just a friendly argument, Lieutenant, just goofin’ around. Steve: It’s between him and me, Lieutenant, I ain’t swearin’ no complaint. Then yer a chump, from Pete.

The Italian gives a pep talk in the washroom, a real peacemaker. Slim Dundee, let bygones be bygones, all that money in that truck. Hey, it’s better this way says another, that copper will never believe you two in a deal together. A chance of a lifetime, Slim, make it up. Okay, I went off my head in there. From Steve, don’t worry, I’ll get rid of the extra man, I’ll be doin’ the drivin’.

Later, inside the truck. He starts drivin’ for the caper. The old man thinks that’s bad about the phony call. Once the guy finds out that his wife is not sick, he’ll know something, And it’s a 40-minute run. Plenty time to make trouble. But nothing comes of it. But maybe we don’t know that for sure.

Flashback: Steve comes back home after an eight month absence. He ruminates about Anna. Married seven years, what went wrong? He goes to The Roundup. We get Yvonne doing the rumba. Great Latin rhythms. Fabulous scene. Steve watches her with a long face. He thinks he doesn’t want to see her. Yeah, right. They meet and spar for a moment, he is good at affecting a certain nonchalance. They chat. Excuse me, you’re sitting in my chair. It’s Dundee. Steve slips away. But he’s got a date with her later and W T F. She went to Yuma and married Dundee. Steve stunned. Of course, he had all the dough. That’s all she ever wanted. This a lucky break for me, hah!

Flashback still. He gets his job back, armored car driver. A few months pass. If only the cigarette seller hadn’t lowered his head at that moment. But there she was. Then they have a moment and she shows him the scars. They collude. They told me to stay away from you, Steve. Lieutenant Pete, mom, others. Slim wanted me. He threatened me.

Slim finds out about them, clandestine meetings. He pays a visit. Following Anna to Steve’s. Omigosh, they’re together and he in an undershirt. Nothings goin’ on but it looks bad. Does he fear for his life getting caught in his undershirt hosting Mrs Dundee? Pretty extravagant to get out of fear by suggesting a heist but Steve does that. Anna looks at Steve askance. You need an inside man says Dundee, distracted.  I’m the inside man. Driving the truck. Hard to believe Slim would go for this. Steve with copper friends like Pete, for one thing. That angle doesn’t signify but does Steve has something up his sleeve? Palis Verde. Anna. It’s decided that Anna will hold the money. Steve didn’t have to work for that, it just happened. Dundee’s idea to boot. Do they both trust her? Uh oh. Duryea has a great moment sitting in the chair with the boys all around, acting like the Godfather and with a demeanor to match.   A good moment for Dan.

M5b8c0j.jpg

 

End of flashback. The heist goes wrong. Exposion, tear gas, smoke galore. Shots are fired.  Steve is in hospital, in traction no less, he wakes up. Lieutenant Pete comes. You’re a hero, Steve. They think you broke it up. Headline of hero Steve in the paper. But I’m in the know. Listen, Steve, if Anna is with you, everything hunky-dunky. If she is against you, you’re are a dead man.

Steve does get a visitor. He is dismantled (Ouch!) by a creepy guy but who succumbs to a Steve’s bribe and takes him to Anna instead of Slim. Palis Verde. Anna, with the dough, takes one look at Steve who is no condition to flee, but flee they must as Slim is nearly upon them. She decides to leave him there. If Steve were not banged up would they leave together. If yes, then Anne’s tirade (which Eddie overpraises) is not so much femme fatale as it is simple survival. She’s being a bad girl, make no mistake …. She is out of her mind with fear. A tinge of fatale perhaps, but that Anna, she is eminently practical. She likes breathing. (But you decide).

Steve can be pretty tough but inside he is kind of a sap. Not too bright. Everybody tries to tell him what to do. Even mom. ‘You all got it all figured out’ is Burt’s signature tune and he’s good at saying it. But Steve, you didn’t have have it figured out either.

Anna can’t get away. It’s Slim at the door. A nasty ending. I forget how Eddie termed it but I would call it opera. Dead and lying there in each other’s arms. Slim Dundee with glazed eyes hears the sirens and waits. A final look of the murdered couple. Fade out. The End. ////

//

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2 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

CRISS-CROSS!

Right you are, of course. But no Hyphen (just to be a nag).

Most would think I was to easy on Anna. I don't see her as real fatale. She blew with wind to save herself. She didn't marry Dundee for money like Steve thought. She was in fear of her life. Not everyone will agree with that. She WAS at least waiting for him at the end. She could have tried to take off with the load. She left when he saw how messed up he was and knew that could not escape with him in tow.

Yvonne doesn't really measure up for me, in general acting. She may have been miscast. But she looked so good. Notice with the rumba we never see her from head to toe. Just facials. She was probably simply jumping up and down.

Burt was perfect either. There were a couple of scenes where he seemed to stumble, but just barely noticeable.

Barb, I take it you have seen this movie?

..

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Bronxgirl48 :I do groove to the atmosphere in BRAVEHEART (and one of my favorites, David O'Hara (THE MATCHMAKER) is in it, but it's too violent for me, and I've never really been crazy about Mel Gibson, as an actor or a sex symbol.

I watched this recently and was determined to stick to the end. A friend of mine recommended. This was meant for the wider audience, if you get my drift. (snob) A little too much over-the-top heroism. Mel Gibson doesn't do a thing for me. I once lauded him for his HAMLET but after a recent watching of that , I took it back. The best thing In BRAVEHEART was that second Queen. I can't name the actress but she looked a lot like Isabel Adjani. That enough for me. Oh, btw, they didn't wear kilts in the 12th C, or whenever it was.

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On 8/13/2020 at 4:38 PM, laffite said:

Right you are, of course. But no Hyphen (just to be a nag).

Most would think I was to easy on Anna. I don't see her as real fatale. She blew with wind to save herself. She didn't marry Dundee for money like Steve thought. She was in fear of her life. Not everyone will agree with that. She WAS at least waiting for him at the end. She could have tried to take off with the load. She left when he saw how messed up he was and knew that could not escape with him in tow.

Yvonne doesn't really measure up for me, in general acting. She may have been miscast. But she looked so good. Notice with the rumba we never see her from head to toe. Just facials. She was probably simply jumping up and down.

Burt was perfect either. There were a couple of scenes where he seemed to stumble, but just barely noticeable.

Barb, I take it you have seen this movie?

..

Don't know why I added that hyphen....weird.  

I have to say I really don't remember CRISS CROSS too well....and I am a Lancaster fan but some of his late '40's stuff doesn't really "stick" with me for some reason.   As for Yvonne, I remember her mainly as Clark Gable's mistress in that Civil War movie -- the title escapes me at the moment.   Sidney Poitier was in it as well.  (and a heartthrob of mine I've never mentioned -- Patric Knowles)

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Well, Barb, you have the advantage over me with The 49th Parallel. You're a girl which means you  make a deal of sorts eyeing members of the opposite sex. What do I have to look at? I would never ogle a 16-year old girl (Well, that's how old she was supposed to be.) I was looking forward in seeing Laurence Oliver anyway, but he was there. Not a whit. I felt like someone in the theater ready to watch Lady In The Lake because I want to see Robert Montgomery. He wasn't there either. Oh wait, I think he looked at himself in the mirror one time and we got to see him. It would have done no good for Laurence to look in the mirror. He still wasn't there. He was draped over with the antic disposition of French-Canadian complete with a deplorable accent. So much for Larry. Leslie Howard is more than competent as a easy going and unsuspecting lover of Art and author of books who would never have dreamed would find the war inside his very tent.  And above the 49th parallel for goodness sakes! That was a nice touch showing a good German (Hey, they aren't all bad!!!) I think lemon face was the most compelling actor although he is only one note, as you say. But it was a good note. When it is realized that this is a propaganda, all the air is let out of the balloon. Maybe too much time has passed. But they did a good job if the intent was to bestir a notion of the necessity of some warring. Most of the actors I read worked for less in the effort. At least Larry sure looked like he was having a good time.

//

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On 1/24/2010 at 12:29 AM, Bronxgirl48 said:

More of Mom's cruelty, re: THE OUT OF TOWNERS:

 

"How did Sandy Dennis get into movies? She looks like a horse!"

I don't think she look's like a horse but I certainly thought that the movie was a bust. Ill-conceived from the get-go, the two actors try desperately to make something of the script. Two headliners in a flop. IMO.

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On 10/13/2012 at 11:24 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

 

 

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Oct 14, 2012 4:59 AM

Hey, Barb, this handsome fella wants to tea with you. i bet he is a wonderful conversationalist too.

:)

EDIT : Oh, the picture didn't transmit. It was Boris as Frankie baby. You'll have to use your imagination.

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On 10/6/2012 at 7:38 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

Lynn, American movies became so cynical in the '70's during the Watergate era. Even though I've never seen GUMBALL RALLY, lol, I'm glad it exists, just from the title, ha! I must add THE LONG GOODBYE to my favorites. I also enjoy DOG DAY AFTERNOON, MEAN STREETS, two hilarious Woody Allens -- LOVE AND DEATH and BANANAS (yes, the latter part of the decade had some gems, including YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN and BLAZING SADDLES) -- THE GROOVE TUBE (remember that one?), SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER, BREAKING AWAY, GODFATHERS 1 and 2. These are all the ones I love just off the top of my head.

Blazing Saddles is one of the worst movies, ever. It plays like bad television. Not funny. O Mel, happened there? But I like most of the mentions above, especially, Young Frankenstein, Saturday Night Fever, the two Woddies, and the Godfathers. Good stuff.

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On 10/22/2009 at 8:08 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

Mom: "I just loved DODSWORTH last night. I never saw Mary Astor in a role like that before! She always plays mean women."

Me: "No she doesn't. She was Judy Garland's mother in MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS".

Mom: "But Mary Astor can't sing, can she?"

Hooray for your Mom? I hope you don't mind bringing her up in a post like this but I agree SO with her. I LOVE that movie and Edith Cortright played by Mary Astor is one of my favorite characters. She is high on m y list as the ideal woman companion.

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On 2/21/2010 at 10:28 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

Ahhh!!! Robert Donat arguably at his most charming in THE CITADEL. And with a Scots accent! (which unfortunately comes and goes, then vanishes completely once he settles in London and becomes rich) And -- guess what?? I didn't even have to WAIT to see those sweet wrists and arms because it's right there at the beginning when he's still a fledging doctor in Wales, rolling up his sleeves to revive the baby! Remember? But the sexiest bit comes right after the mine surgery on the fellow, when Andrew comes out and is greeted by wifey Roz with a cup of hot chocolate, which they share. He's also got his sleeves rolled up, and embraces the cup and her at the same time. His wrists and arms are SO graceful, sinuous, tender yet strong. I'm swooning too!

 

I hated that penny-pinching Mrs. Page. Did you see the Dickensian meal she gives young Bob upon his arrival? I laughed when he named a lab rat after her.

 

But I've got a few problems with the movie....First of all, he and Russell's "courtship" seems to take all of two seconds, then he's asking her to marry him, and she of course immediately accepts. Roz is supposed to be a dedicated teacher and tells him she loves her work, yet apparently drops it forever to become his assistant once they get hitched. Her ("British") accent also comes and goes, even before they get to the big city. Ralph Richardson gives a juicy performance and almost threatens to overshadow Bob's; ditto Professor Higgins when brash young Rex Harrison pops up later on. The second half drags, is predictable, melodramatic and lacks focus, and is about as truly satisfying as Donat's lucrative but hollow successes as a society physician.

 

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Feb 22, 2010 1:53 AM

I have not see this one, shucks. I have only seen 39 steps. I'm a big Richardson fan though, I'll try to catch this when it turns up.

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On 4/27/2010 at 8:46 PM, Bronxgirl48 said:

 

Might I be Lassie instead? Then I could bite Anton Walbrook as Louis Bauer on the legs and throw him down a well, because he is one mean, unrelenting s.o.b. Charles Boyer is practically Alan Alda in comparison.

 

It's tough to say which is the "definitive" version of this story. I can't quite make up my mind. Maybe....neither, lol? Supposedly the original adheres much closer to Patrick Hamilton's play, but what does that mean? Social commentary disguised as Gothic Grand Guignol on the oppressed role of women and their rule-with-impunity Victorian husbands? Because Anton Walbrook is definitely the head of the household in a way that smooth, suave Charles Boyer could never be.

Walbrook uses his voice as an arsenal -- he barks, cajoles, berates, and practically HISSES. Poor Diana Wynyard doesn't know one moment to the next which verbal assault mode is coming her way.

 

This is a maddening film, no pun intended. There are some creative visual touches, but the director also lets things just plod along, almost as if he didn't want to be accused of being over-the-top with this kind of fulsome period melodrama, so I found everything pretty tepid, dare I say, even dull. There's no romantic backstory as there is in the remake -- when we see the couple, they're already married and preparing to move into the house. Diana and Anton don't quite "mesh" together the way Ingrid and Charles do -- they're just not as "intimate" in their scenes with each other. There's a colorful retired detective (Frank Pettingell, looking marvelously like someone out of a Dickens novel) who has his suspicions and goes about in his own unique way of fishing out secrets. Some dialogue is rather sexually explicit for the time (between Bauer and parlor maid Nancy) and the murder is actually shown, although not quite as graphic, say, as in any number of Universal horror movies of that era)

 

Cathleen Cordell as Nancy cannot hold a candle to Angela Lansbury.

Cordell is irritating as she lasciviously grins her way through the role that Angela truly made her own with economy of gesture, and infinitely more subtlety. Anton is out and out ferocious, and yet there is a curious stiffness to his Bauer, but I'm thinking this may be delibate on Walbrook's part, portraying a maniac who is brilliant at role-playing the moralistic and "stiff"-necked, "sane" husband. He does have an extremely good "end", though -- tied up in a chair, with his now wised-up spouse in front of him with the knife in her hand, through Walbrook's masterful expressions (his eyes) we see the insanity behind the mask of pious and smug authority. He's like a trapped wild animal, a feral beast whose true nature has suddenly been exposed, and it's a bravura moment for this underrated actor.

 

I enjoyed Diana Wynyard in this part, although she does not engage in any showy outbursts of hysteria the way Ingrid does. Bergman (and also Boyer) play their parts introspectively, whereas Anton and Diana are basically stock figures in an old-fashioned "barnstormer". But there's something about Wynyard I was instinctively drawn to as a performer, and she's got me very interested. I now want to see all her work. In some undefined way she reminded me a bit of Vivien Leigh, though I'd still have to get my thoughts together on this to explain it in any rational way. It has nothing to do with any comparable looks -- Wynyard isn't all that attractive, but she has a skilled, understated dramatic presence that caught my eye and made me think of her in parts beyond the parameters of the English stage and film worlds. (Mrs. Treadwell from SHIP OF FOOLS? Maybe even Blanche in STREETCAR? Or am I totally off base?) She also brings to mind Margaret Leighton.

 

Cukor allows Ingrid to "modernize" her character by letting us identify with the advancing stranglehood of her paranoia, the erosion of trust and the indignity of betrayal. In the original, we're not really emotionally invested in Diana's plight, not through any fault in Wynyard's performance, just the limitations of the script in terms of character development.

 

All in all, I'd have to say that the remake is probably "better" overall in terms of almost everything -- production, pace, script, and acting, but it's just too glossy and slick for my liking, so, I guess if I have to choose, I prefer the diffuse, raggedy quaint British charm of the original, even though it's frankly no great shakes. (the lousy YouTube print didn't help)

 

 

 

Edited by: Bronxgirl48 on Apr 28, 2010 12:05 PM

I hope I'm not throwing too much at you, but this is a good one although I'm not sure what film you are talking about. I didn't get the antecedent part of the conversation. Maybe you enlighten me. You have such a way of talking about a movie. I love it. Can I start a fan club for you? I have to be president though.

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