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BRONXGIRL'S MOTHER, HENRY FONDA'S HIRSUTENESS, ETC.


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On 2/8/2021 at 9:20 PM, Swithin said:

This old Bronxite thanks you for that Bronxgirl! I guess I knew nine out of the eleven. I didn't know about the Tour de Bronx,  or the dome/foundry.  Btw we never referred to the Arthur Avenue/Mt. Carmel area as Little Italy.  I know that section well, we just called it "Arthur Avenue." 

We never referred to Arthur Ave as Little Italy. I did eat in a couple of restaurants on Arthur Ave many years ago. Thanks for the Bronx tour Barb. I grew up near Van Cortlandt Park. I lived about 2 miles away from Jerome Ave. Entrance to the park was Gun Hill Rd ( my neighborhood) and Jerome Ave. There is a website called Forgotten NY that has photos and detailed descriptions of my neighborhood in the Bronx so many years ago and a complete tour of Gun Hill Rd.  Woodlawn Cemetary was in my neighborhood and I never knew while growing up near there ( it ended at the end of my street) how many famous people were buried there. Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Irving Berlin, Herman Melville, George M. Cohan, Damon Runyon, Max Roach, Dorothy Parker, Bat Masterson and many more !!!!!!!

 You, Swithin and I were lucky to have grown up in the Bronx. We 3 probably passed each other in an aisle in Alexander's or sat near each other watching a great movie at the Loew's Paradise

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On 2/14/2021 at 8:38 PM, rohanaka said:

💗Hello, Miss B.  Hope your Valentine's Day was happy and blessed.💗

Thank you dear friend.  Yours as well.

I enjoyed sausage pizza with some crummy old horror movies, lol!

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19 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

We never referred to Arthur Ave as Little Italy. I did eat in a couple of restaurants on Arthur Ave many years ago. Thanks for the Bronx tour Barb. I grew up near Van Cortlandt Park. I lived about 2 miles away from Jerome Ave. Entrance to the park was Gun Hill Rd ( my neighborhood) and Jerome Ave. There is a website called Forgotten NY that has photos and detailed descriptions of my neighborhood in the Bronx so many years ago and a complete tour of Gun Hill Rd.  Woodlawn Cemetary was in my neighborhood and I never knew while growing up near there ( it ended at the end of my street) how many famous people were buried there. Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Irving Berlin, Herman Melville, George M. Cohan, Damon Runyon, Max Roach, Dorothy Parker, Bat Masterson and many more !!!!!!!

 You, Swithin and I were lucky to have grown up in the Bronx. We 3 probably passed each other in an aisle in Alexander's or sat near each other watching a great movie at the Loew's Paradise

Hi, lavender!  Thanks so much.   And we had Poe Cottage!  Very literary borough!

We just might have all been shopping at one time or another in Alexanders or sitting next to each other during THE TEN COMMANDMENTS, THE FIVE PENNIES or THE HAUNTING.  (that is, depending on your ages, lol)  

I grew up in the West Bronx on Aqueduct Avenue.  We had a lovely park across the street.  So many good memories.

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On 2/8/2021 at 6:06 AM, DougieB said:

And there are no commercials like you get with Pandora and other services. Singers and Swing is my go-to and I put Light Classical on low for the doggies when I'm (almost never these days) out of the house. They do a rotating Songs of the Season, which is mostly the usual suspects but can also feature some nice surprises. There are also a few good yule log-type choices at Christmas. If I had my druthers they'd also have a classic comedy channel, with Nichols and May, Bob Newhart, people like that.  

 

On 1/29/2021 at 9:57 AM, Bronxgirl48 said:

Hey, John, thanks for the MUSIC CHOICE heads-up!

 

I am an incorrigible long hair so I generally limit myself to CLASSICAL MASTERPIECES and LIGHT CLASSICAL with an occasional foray into JAZZ (but not smooth jazz). Dougie, you mention "surprises." Indeed, that is so. There are composers represented I only partially know and others I've never heard tell at all. Some of these are nice surprises, others not at all. I love the Classics but I am not endowed with a lot of former knowledge but if I can trust my intuitive ear, there is ample purpose in believing that it is no surprise than some pieces are not only not a household names but never even heard in the glen.  Some of it is repetitious and cliched as if struggling for definition, as if the composer is improvising hoping to catch an idea. But others I like so much I write down their names and compositions and then look on U-tube. I have noticed of late that LIGHT CLASSICAL offers at times soft little gems, usually in the early evening on the West coast that can be very pleasant. If you're on the other coast or someplace in between please try to find the right time in your area and give a listen. Say 9PM on the East Coast, etc. Very relaxing and contemplative. Barb, this may be for you, as it is for me. They probably don't do that every evening though.

//

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After watching EVERY GIRL SHOULD BE MARRIED (1948), I feel that my opinion of Cary Grant in comedies may be shifting to the better. My epiphany is that it is only the screwball comedies that I object to. I have talked to people here who love all things Cary and the comedies especially and the screwball comedies especially still. My wholly unqualified opinion that something fails in the screwy comedies is a conviction that, intrinsically, there is nor real genius there. He bumbles around as if he is in some middling TV skit (or worse, he reminds of Chevy Chase movies), In the more sophisticated comedies he is much better, that smooth sophistication is perfect. The above movie is a good example. Betsy Drake is divine, a gentle but conniving (of a benevolent sort, I think) as she tried to entrap her man.

I think another is IN NAME ONLY which has one of the most wonderful beginnings of all time. The fishing scene. Cary and Carole share a fishing pole and a sandwich. I don't remember the whole movie much.  Kay Francis had a scene when she gets angry and is horrible. Anyone remember anything like that? I'm probably imagining it.

Anyway, Go Cary !!!. You have achieved some rehabilitation in my poor eyes. Of course, you are great in NORTH BY NORTHWEST and stuff like that.

:)

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Weary River (1929)  This is a hybrid, part talkie/part silent. The opening sequence belies any notion of Richard Barthelmess being a stiff and wooden klutz.  It's in a night club (silent) with Richard bouncing around with verve, totally fluid in motion, fine gesture and pantomime movements. He's actually dazzling. Later he talks and is not bad some of the gas is taken out of him. His character, Jerry Larrabee is gangster-type who gets framed and sent to jail. There, improbable as all get-out (but I love it) he rehabilitates himself by learning to compose music, sing songs. leads orchestra. While in prison he sings the title song. Note: I wonder if this movie sets the record for the most times in a film a title song has been rendered. He sings it four times? But it is not forced. All four times the sung more or less the same way but slightly different depending where the story is at that point, so it all seems to appropriate (the song was dubbed by singer named John Murray).

MV5BMTY3MjAwMDE5MF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMzE4

I won't go on with the story but while in gangster mode, Larrabee has a girlfriend (we know she is batty about him but not sure if vice-versa). She is played almost brilliantly I think (or at least, very, very, very, very good, excellent in fact) Being of that element of society she is not exactly profound low-life, maybe a prostitute (I think not), but certainly a low-life of sorts, a moll. She later becomes sweet and good and very pleasing like that. We get a SOME CAME RUNNING vibe as when he asked her a question and she answers like a regular Shirley MacLaine, "Do you mean it?  Are you kidding me!" You get the idea. She is Sally Gray, played wonderfully by Betty Compson. I don't know her and didn't expect a whole lot but she sort of wowed me. It could be I was in an easy mood. I looker her up and she had a quite a career, almost wining an Academy Award, losing to Mary Pickford (Coquette).

Sally Gray appears in the video linked below. She is not in the audience. She is listening over the radio in a night club with others. I think Jerry Larrabee is still in the clink.  Oh, the talkie sequences were good, sort of advanced for 1929.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lKH3NPGb6uU

Anyone else seen this?

//

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5 hours ago, laffite said:

After watching EVERY GIRL SHOULD BE MARRIED (1948), I feel that my opinion of Cary Grant in comedies may be shifting to the better. My epiphany is that it is only the screwball comedies that I object to. [...]

Some of the Cary Grant comedies which I do not consider screwball comedies are:

Indiscreet (1958)
The Grass Is Greener (1960)
The Awful Truth (1937)
The Bishop's Wife (1947)
Father Goose (1964)
The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer (1947)
Mr. Lucky (1943)
Walk Don't Run (1966)
That Touch of Mink (1962)

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3 minutes ago, SansFin said:

Some of the Cary Grant comedies which I do not consider screwball comedies are:

Indiscreet (1958)
The Grass Is Greener (1960)
The Awful Truth (1937)
The Bishop's Wife (1947)
Father Goose (1964)
The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer (1947)
Mr. Lucky (1943)
Walk Don't Run (1966)
That Touch of Mink (1962)

Though my memory be not green, a couple or few of those I believe I have watched.

I did not like THAT TOUCH OF MINK much. This was long ago indeed but I seem to remember that there was no chemistry between the two. And Cary seemed uncomfortable in his scenes with Doris, and perhaps vice-versa. Anything to that? I could be very wrong but it was my impression at the time.

Thanks for the list, SansFin.

//

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The 'Trivia' page on IMDb.com for the movie includes:

"In her autobiography, Doris Day wrote: "Of all the people I performed with, I got to know Cary Grant least of all. He is a completely private person, totally reserved, and there is no way into him. Our relationship on That Touch of Mink (1962) was amicable but devoid of give-and-take...Not that he wasn't friendly and polite - he certainly was. But distant. Very distant. But very professional - maybe the most professional, exacting actor I ever worked with. In the scenes we played, he concerned himself with every little detail: clothes, sets, production values, the works. Cary even got involved in helping to choose the kind of mink I was slated to wear in the film.""

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On 2/16/2021 at 11:09 PM, SansFin said:

The 'Trivia' page on IMDb.com for the movie includes:

"In her autobiography, Doris Day wrote: "Of all the people I performed with, I got to know Cary Grant least of all. He is a completely private person, totally reserved, and there is no way into him. Our relationship on That Touch of Mink (1962) was amicable but devoid of give-and-take...Not that he wasn't friendly and polite - he certainly was. But distant. Very distant. But very professional - maybe the most professional, exacting actor I ever worked with. In the scenes we played, he concerned himself with every little detail: clothes, sets, production values, the works. Cary even got involved in helping to choose the kind of mink I was slated to wear in the film.""

Audrey Meadows practically stole this movie from both Cary and Doris.   I can't believe Hollywood didn't make better and more frequent use of her. 

Audrey's boss at the Automat (the great Richard Deacon) after witnessing her pass all sorts of free food to Doris: "Are you aware of this company's policy on giving away free food?" Audrey (unfazed): "No sir. Are we for it or against it?" She had an acid tongue and comic timing that put her in a league with Thelma Ritter and Eve Arden, the best in the business. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

lafitte, thanks for that nifty review of WEARY RIVER.   Never seen it, but I'm a fan of Richard Barthelmess; in fact, I've always had a little crush on him.  

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On 2/18/2021 at 8:46 AM, DougieB said:

Audrey Meadows practically stole this movie from both Cary and Doris.   I can't believe Hollywood didn't make better and more frequent use of her. 

Audrey's boss at the Automat (the great Richard Deacon) after witnessing her pass all sorts of free food to Doris: "Are you aware of this company's policy on giving away free food?" Audrey (unfazed): "No sir. Are we for it or against it?" She had an acid tongue and comic timing that put her in a league with Thelma Ritter and Eve Arden, the best in the business. 

Agree, Dougie.  And of course Jackie Gleason made the absolute right choice hiring her for The Honeymooners.   I can't imagine any other actress in that role going head-to-head with "Ralph" and holding her own opposite Gleason.

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On 2/16/2021 at 11:09 PM, SansFin said:

The 'Trivia' page on IMDb.com for the movie includes:

"In her autobiography, Doris Day wrote: "Of all the people I performed with, I got to know Cary Grant least of all. He is a completely private person, totally reserved, and there is no way into him. Our relationship on That Touch of Mink (1962) was amicable but devoid of give-and-take...Not that he wasn't friendly and polite - he certainly was. But distant. Very distant. But very professional - maybe the most professional, exacting actor I ever worked with. In the scenes we played, he concerned himself with every little detail: clothes, sets, production values, the works. Cary even got involved in helping to choose the kind of mink I was slated to wear in the film.""

Sounds like control-freak Cary all right, lol.  And remember when Loretta Young was taken aback when he made a fuss over some minor business in THE BISHOP'S WIFE.

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lafitte, have you seen ARSENIC AND OLD LACE?  Cary himself didn't think this was one of his better performances but I disagree -- in my opinion his so-called mugging is pitch-perfect!  And talk about screwball (the theme of this play is: everybody is/goes mad in some form or another -- similiar to PSYCHO) and Grant's immensely talented kinetic comedy skills -- one of my favorite movies overall and for me a Halloween staple every year!

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1 hour ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

lafitte, thanks for that nifty review of WEARY RIVER.   Never seen it, but I'm a fan of Richard Barthelmess; in fact, I've always had a little crush on him.  

Oh, you'll love him even more, especially at the beginning. Oh, so SUAVE as Mickey says to Judy in one of their Opuses. He may sweep you off your feet so you better be sitting down. Later his persona changes and not sure whether you'll like it or not. Betty Compson is a big hit for me in WR. I like the song too.

On 2/16/2021 at 8:09 PM, SansFin said:

The 'Trivia' page on IMDb.com for the movie includes:

"In her autobiography, Doris Day wrote: "Of all the people I performed with, I got to know Cary Grant least of all. He is a completely private person, totally reserved, and there is no way into him. Our relationship on That Touch of Mink (1962) was amicable but devoid of give-and-take...Not that he wasn't friendly and polite - he certainly was. But distant. Very distant. But very professional - maybe the most professional, exacting actor I ever worked with. In the scenes we played, he concerned himself with every little detail: clothes, sets, production values, the works. Cary even got involved in helping to choose the kind of mink I was slated to wear in the film.""

I didn't know this. Another guy Doris did not take to (or vice versa) is Kirk Douglas.

1 hour ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

lafitte, have you seen ARSENIC AND OLD LACE?  Cary himself didn't think this was one of his better performances but I disagree -- in my opinion his so-called mugging is pitch-perfect!  And talk about screwball (the theme of this play is: everybody is/goes mad in some form or another -- similiar to PSYCHO) and Grant's immensely talented kinetic comedy skills -- one of my favorite movies overall and for me a Halloween staple every year!

I would not see myself watching this one but on the strength of your recommendation, most assuredly. Thanks.

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14 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

lafitte, thanks for that nifty review of WEARY RIVER.   Never seen it, but I'm a fan of Richard Barthelmess; in fact, I've always had a little crush on him.  

BTW, I notice that Weary River will air again on Mar 19 at 1230 pm EST. I hope you will see it.

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On 3/12/2021 at 8:42 AM, Bronxgirl48 said:

lafitte, have you seen ARSENIC AND OLD LACE?  Cary himself didn't think this was one of his better performances but I disagree -- in my opinion his so-called mugging is pitch-perfect!  And talk about screwball (the theme of this play is: everybody is/goes mad in some form or another -- similiar to PSYCHO) and Grant's immensely talented kinetic comedy skills -- one of my favorite movies overall and for me a Halloween staple every year!

Speaking of pitch-perfect, Capra was so smart to bring Josephine Hull and Jean Adair from Broadway, even though they were basically unknown to movie audiences. They really embodied your idea that everyone's mad in some form by playing it so straight, without the scattershot dithering and overkill others might have resorted to in the roles. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

It breaks my heart to think of you down there with all the spring break fools.  Somebody needs to start a William Castle punishment poll for your Governor

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On 3/23/2021 at 2:11 PM, DougieB said:

It breaks my heart to think of you down there with all the spring break fools.  Somebody needs to start a William Castle punishment poll for your Governor

LOL

I know, "Flori-duh"

The jury's still out on Ron tbh.  

But don't get me started on that, ha!

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On 3/12/2021 at 10:47 PM, laffite said:

BTW, I notice that Weary River will air again on Mar 19 at 1230 pm EST. I hope you will see it.

Unfortunately I had errands on that day and wasn't able to watch.

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