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Actor, Director, and Producer Norman Lloyd (1914-2021)


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On 5/12/2021 at 1:30 PM, CinemaInternational said:

Just a moment to mention that  every single episode of St. Elsewhere is streaming on Hulu. Since only one season was put on DVD, it is a great perk to have the ability to see the five remaining seasons.

Yes, it's wonderful. He's in every season. The first season he was recurring, but seasons 2-6 he is a regular member of the cast.

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On 5/12/2021 at 11:14 AM, Hibi said:

Did he ever write his memoirs?

In case you haven't already found the book itself, it's called Stages: Of Life in Theatre, Film and Television.

I read it a couple of years ago and found it fascinating.  After I first got to know Lloyd as Dr. Auschlander in St. Elsewhere and then learned more about him, I thought he had to be one of the most interesting people in Hollywood, and Stages confirms that.  My gosh: Lloyd played a notable role in Orson Welles' famous fascist-set stage version of Julius Caesar in the 30s; was directed on stage by Elia Kazan; worked with Hitchcock in both film and behind the scenes on Hitch's TV show (the latter helping Lloyd out of blacklist-era unemployment); worked with Jean Renoir, whom Lloyd said looked like a "large Idaho potato farmer";  was a personal friend of Charles Chaplin, who also featured Lloyd in LImelight; and had TV success in St. Elsewhere.   It's amazing that until just a couple days ago, someone with this length and breadth of experience still lived among us.

Stages was derived from oral-history interviews that Lloyd gave for a Directors Guild of America project.  Even though it's not in question-and-answer form -- it's organized as a more-or-less chronological autobiography -- the book is perhaps more conversational than one that was initially created in written form.  And a conversation with Norman Lloyd about his long life is definitely a good thing!

Even though he lived a very long life full of fascinating experiences, I'm still sad to see him go.  There's no one else like Norman Lloyd.

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7 minutes ago, BingFan said:

In case you haven't already found the book itself, it's called Stages: Of Life in Theatre, Film and Television.

I read it a couple of years ago and found it fascinating.  After I first got to know Lloyd as Dr. Auschlander in St. Elsewhere and then learned more about him, I thought he had to be one of the most interesting people in Hollywood, and Stages confirms that.  My gosh: Lloyd played a notable role in Orson Welles' famous fascist-set stage version of Julius Caesar in the 30s; was directed on stage by Elia Kazan; worked with Hitchcock in both film and behind the scenes on Hitch's TV show (the latter helping Lloyd out of blacklist-era unemployment); worked with Jean Renoir, whom Lloyd said looked like a "large Idaho potato farmer";  was a personal friend of Charles Chaplin, who also featured Lloyd in LImelight; and had TV success in St. Elsewhere.   It's amazing that until just a couple days ago, someone with this length and breadth of experience still lived among us.

Stages was derived from oral-history interviews that Lloyd gave for a Directors Guild of America project.  Even though it's not in question-and-answer form -- it's organized as a more-or-less chronological autobiography -- the book is perhaps more conversational than one that was initially created in written form.  And a conversation with Norman Lloyd about his long life is definitely a good thing!

Even though he lived a very long life full of fascinating experiences, I'm still sad to see him go.  There's no one else like Norman Lloyd.

 

Yes. Sadly, the public library here does not own ONE copy! And state libraries either except for one that does not circulate! Unbelievable! I will have to go through ILL, I guess.

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2 hours ago, sagebrush said:

TCM Remembers: Norman Lloyd

 

Wow, while watching this, I noticed what seemed a coincidence of the shot taking place at the 31 second mark.

The coincidence being that I believe it is Marsha Hunt (and now the last surviving actor from Mr. Lloyd's era, and presently 103 years of age) that Norman wraps his arms around and kisses in that scene.

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Josie Lloyd, Norman's daughter who passed away just last year, is familiar to classic TV fans from her 4 appearances on The Andy Griffith Show --- twice as Mayor Pike's daughter Juanita/Josephine and twice as Lydia Crosswaithe, the worst blind date in Mayberry.

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16 hours ago, Wayne said:

Josie Lloyd, Norman's daughter who passed away just last year, is familiar to classic TV fans from her 4 appearances on The Andy Griffith Show --- twice as Mayor Pike's daughter Juanita/Josephine and twice as Lydia Crosswaithe, the worst blind date in Mayberry.

Yes,  I remember Josie Lloyd:

What happened to actress Josie Lloyd (who was on the 'Andy Griffith Show')?  - Quora

 

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And one of the funniest. Talk about having a monotone voice. She had to sit next to the window in

a car just in case she got carsick and needed to open the window and upchuck. What a gal.

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Lol. He was amazing. I spent the entire run of St. Elsewhere, from episode 1, worried that he was going to die. He outlived most of them, and St. Elsewhere by well over 30 years!  He seemed so old when it debuted, and he was only in his sixties! Loved him. 

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On 5/12/2021 at 1:30 PM, CinemaInternational said:

Just a moment to mention that  every single episode of St. Elsewhere is streaming on Hulu. Since only one season was put on DVD, it is a great perk to have the ability to see the five remaining seasons.

I started going through St. Elsewhere again on Hulu. I am now at the beginning of season 2, where Mark Harmon's character is introduced.

I think what works so well is the one-two-three punch of Ed Flanders, Norman Lloyd and William Daniels. Daniels' character is a narcissist who is undeniably a gifted surgeon, sharing techniques and wisdom with his mentees. Lloyd's character is dealing with cancer and he has these great deadpan moments, because he knows the value of life, more than everyone else at the hospital. Flanders plays a less comedic character trying to get to the bottom of things and deal with the chaos and madness.

There are no wasted moments on screen, everything is included for a reason. And they have these wonderful method actors coming in for short arcs. At the beginning of season 2, Piper Laurie is a stroke victim and her husband, played by Alan Arkin, forces her to get well because he cannot deal with having an invalid wife. It's all so excellent to watch.

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On 5/13/2021 at 9:22 PM, Wayne said:

Josie Lloyd, Norman's daughter who passed away just last year, is familiar to classic TV fans from her 4 appearances on The Andy Griffith Show --- twice as Mayor Pike's daughter Juanita/Josephine and twice as Lydia Crosswaithe, the worst blind date in Mayberry.

OMG! SHE played Lydia????????? She was hilarious! Too bad she never became a regular........

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2 hours ago, Hibi said:

OMG! SHE played Lydia????????? She was hilarious! Too bad she never became a regular........

I never knew she was Norman Lloyd's daughter until 3 weeks ago.  She was in a Twilight Zone episode that aired a few weeks back, and I looked her up on IMDb, because I had only ever seen her on TAGS.

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In September 2000 Norman Lloyd sat down with the Television Academy Foundation for a three-hour interview. He was 86 at the time (and that was over twenty years ago!). 

In his three-hour Archive interview, Norman Lloyd (1914-2021) discusses getting his start in theater as a child actor and later as an apprentice to Eva La Gallienne. He talks in detail about his involvement with "The Mercury Theater" and describes its first production, a modern dress adaptation of Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar." He speaks of his entrance into feature films, in Alfred Hitchcock's "Saboteur," in which he played the title role. Lloyd details his extensive career in television, which began with two 1939 NBC experimental productions. He recounts his work at MCA's Revue Productions, as a director for series including The Gruen Theater, which then led to his long association as an actor, director, and producer of Alfred Hitchcock Presents and The Alfred Hitchcock Hour. He recalls his work as executive producer and director of KCET's Hollywood Television Theater. Finally, he discusses the role with which he is most closely identified, that of "Dr. Daniel Auschlander" on the critically-acclaimed series St. Elsewhere. 

https://interviews.televisionacademy.com/interviews/norman-lloyd

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