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23 minutes ago, Dargo said:

trendy little shag number

Best thing about that haircut is your buddy having zero beautician experience could keep your shag looking fresh!

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Just now, Moe Howard said:

Best thing about that haircut is your buddy having zero beautician experience could keep your shag looking fresh!

Yes, and the art of using hedge-clippers also comes in mighty handy too.

(...and, you have to remember that this would be a few years before the makers of The Flowbee would file for a patent)

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The Richard Gere line is— I seen the movie.   Class all the way.  
 

And Jane Fonda was smokin’ hot in Klute.  She rocked that shag, which I agree is not generally a flattering hairstyle.   Regardless of one’s opinion of Fonda in general, surely we can all agree that no one doubted for a minute that men were willing to part with large sums of money for an hour of Bree Daniels’ time. 

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Well, truth be known here speedy, but I ALSO never thought Florence Henderson carried off that look very well either. ;)

(...in fact, I guess I also have to admit I can't recall thinking ANY woman looking good to me with them sporting that cut back then...and be they an actress/celebrity or not)

Florence's shag had a longer bottom part though--I thought her hair looked best in the last season when she chopped that part off.  It was like a shag mullet.  Jane's hair is cut in a shag all over--I think it looks more chic than Florence's.

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2 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I might be in the minority, but I kind of liked Jane's shag haircut in Klute. I thought it was a cool haircut and trendy for 1971.  I would never cut my hair like that, I just don't have the right aesthetic to carry it off.  But I thought Jane was working it and I loved her in that film.  I thought Klute was excellent.

I agree, thought Klute was excellent. Only once did I have much shorter hair and that was when a friend got me an appointment with a photographer/make-up artist in NY who had done Cosmo covers. He cut my hair in a shag and it looked great. Problem was I couldn't afford to go to him again and no one could cut it that way so I let it grow out. However, for those few months I had that cut I loved it.

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34 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

I agree, thought Klute was excellent. Only once did I have much shorter hair and that was when a friend got me an appointment with a photographer/make-up artist in NY who had done Cosmo covers. He cut my hair in a shag and it looked great. Problem was I couldn't afford to go to him again and no one could cut it that way so I let it grow out. However, for those few months I had that cut I loved it.

It seems like a cut that would be low maintenance while you had the cut, but you would perhaps have to get haircuts more frequently (at least I would because my hair grows really fast) to keep the shape.  However, it seems like it would grow out nicely. 

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2 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

It seems like a cut that would be low maintenance while you had the cut, but you would perhaps have to get haircuts more frequently (at least I would because my hair grows really fast) to keep the shape.  However, it seems like it would grow out nicely. 

It did, this guy was so talented, best make-up also. I got tons of compliments. I've always had long hair, still do but it was fun and so different for me to have that cut. Of course, hard not to look great when you're in your 20's LOL

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4 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Well, Atherton CAN certainly be dull!  :D   And for a while, Berenger played TOMMY LEE JONES' brother in law on the soap ONE LIFE TO LIVE.  

And if you recall, Atherton's character was also too "straightlaced"  for Keaton's character.  She got bored and moved on.

Sepiatone

My mom only watched the NBC soaps, so I would have missed him. Got stuck with Mac the old long-haired

corporate shill and his wife Rachel, who was young enough to be his daughter and maybe granddaughter. Some

of those soaps were hilarious.  I can't blame Keaton, he was pretty tiresome.

 

Back to books. When she first met Gere in the bar she introduced herself as Raskolnikov, using a first name I

didn't hear clearly enough. So maybe she had read Crime and Punishment. 

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26 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

My mom only watched the NBC soaps, so I would have missed him. Got stuck with Mac the old long-haired

corporate shill and his wife Rachel, who was young enough to be his daughter and maybe granddaughter. Some

of those soaps were hilarious.  I can't blame Keaton, he was pretty tiresome.

 

Back to books. When she first met Gere in the bar she introduced herself as Raskolnikov, using a first name I

didn't hear clearly enough. So maybe she had read Crime and Punishment. 

Sonya Katrina Raskolnikov

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1 hour ago, alleybj said:

Sonya Katrina Raskolnikov

Thanks. I thought the first name was Sonya, but wasn't completely sure and I missed Katrina.

While it looks like these two crazy kids will get married eventually, at the end of the novel

I think they're just in the falling in love stage and still single. 

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Ya think?  I think she was clearly slumming, and it came back to bite her. I think that’s what so many people had an issue with. She was free and liberated, and in this particular instance, she died for it.  I don’t think it was moralizing, though. It never tried to say that you shouldn’t be sexually free cuz it might kill you. It was just telling a sad and moving story. 

1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

Thanks. I thought the first name was Sonya, but wasn't completely sure and I missed Katrina.

While it looks like these two crazy kids will get married eventually, at the end of the novel

I think they're just in the falling in love stage and still single. 

 

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5 hours ago, alleybj said:

Ya think?  I think she was clearly slumming, and it came back to bite her. I think that’s what so many people had an issue with. She was free and liberated, and in this particular instance, she died for it.  I don’t think it was moralizing, though. It never tried to say that you shouldn’t be sexually free cuz it might kill you. It was just telling a sad and moving story. 

 

I should have made it clearer that I was talking about the two characters from Crime and Punishment, in a

somewhat facetious way, and not the folks from Goodbar. Theresa was so constrained by her upbringing and

family that she likely wanted to get a taste of the personal freedom. I also don't think the movie blamed her

death on her own actions. It is partly a numbers game. The more people you socialize with the greater chance

that you might run into a dangerous person, but that's on that person not their victim. It's a variation on

being in the wrong place at the wrong time, except it's running across the wrong person. 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 5/14/2021 at 10:37 PM, Vautrin said:

I should have made it clearer that I was talking about the two characters from Crime and Punishment, in a

somewhat facetious way, and not the folks from Goodbar. Theresa was so constrained by her upbringing and

family that she likely wanted to get a taste of the personal freedom. I also don't think the movie blamed her

death on her own actions. It is partly a numbers game. The more people you socialize with the greater chance

that you might run into a dangerous person, but that's on that person not their victim. It's a variation on

being in the wrong place at the wrong time, except it's running across the wrong person. 

It's interesting that some viewers of LOOKING FOR MR GOODBAR have characterized writer-director Richard Brooks's attitude and tone as judgmental toward the main character's sexual promiscuity, but in reality his attitude was the complete opposite. 

Here's what he told The New York Times in an article published on July 24, 1977:

[***SPOLIERS BELOW*** These would not haven been spoilers to NYT readers in 1977 who would most  likely have been familiar with the ending  of the book that the movie was adapted from]
"In “Looking for Mr. Goodbar” everybody knows Terry is going to get killed in exactly an hour‐and‐a‐half, and too much is made of her death as punishment. God looked down and said ‘You went to bars so now we're going to have you murdered.’
I wanted to do a story about a contemporary girl who is influenced by the world in which she lives, not only by her upbringing and her physical handicap but by seeing Hustler and Penthouse on the newstands. By the advertisements on TV that are more violent even than knifings and car chases. ‘If you use this toothpaste, that fellow will kiss you.’ That is a violent lie. ‘If you wear these p a n t y hose, people will think you're not wearing anything.’ That is a violent provocation. Sex and violence are inextricably linked. There is more frustration and violence in the marriage bed than the battlefields.”
 
In the same New York Times article, Richard Brooks noted that he didn't like the character of the girl in the book: “I didn't like the girl because she was a crybaby, full of selfpity." Therefore, the girl in Brooks's screenplay and the girl that Diane Keaton played under Brooks's direction was less self-pitying than the one in the book and was, according to Brooks, "full of a joy of life. She has very deep desires—physical as well as emotional—and she wants to express them."

I saw the movie for the first time when it premiered on TCM a few years ago (maybe 2016?) and I watched it again recently.  The role that Diane Keaton plays in the movie is truly one of the most complex ones ever to be appear in a movie ---- I'm talking much more complex than even Blanche DuBois  ----- and Keaton pulls off the complexities brilliantly.  I'm really surprised she wasn't nominated for an Oscar for this role. 

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15 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

It's interesting that some viewers of LOOKING FOR MR GOODBAR have characterized writer-director Richard Brooks's attitude and tone as judgmental toward the main character's sexual promiscuity, but in reality his attitude was the complete opposite. 

Here's what he told The New York Times in an article published on July 24, 1977:

[***SPOLIERS BELOW*** These would not haven been spoilers to NYT readers in 1977 who would most  likely have been familiar with the ending  of the book that the movie was adapted from]
"In “Looking for Mr. Goodbar” everybody knows Terry is going to get killed in exactly an hour‐and‐a‐half, and too much is made of her death as punishment. God looked down and said ‘You went to bars so now we're going to have you murdered.’
I wanted to do a story about a contemporary girl who is influenced by the world in which she lives, not only by her upbringing and her physical handicap but by seeing Hustler and Penthouse on the newstands. By the advertisements on TV that are more violent even than knifings and car chases. ‘If you use this toothpaste, that fellow will kiss you.’ That is a violent lie. ‘If you wear these p a n t y hose, people will think you're not wearing anything.’ That is a violent provocation. Sex and violence are inextricably linked. There is more frustration and violence in the marriage bed than the battlefields.”
 
In the same New York Times article, Richard Brooks noted that he didn't like the character of the girl in the book: “I didn't like the girl because she was a crybaby, full of selfpity." Therefore, the girl in Brooks's screenplay and the girl that Diane Keaton played under Brooks's direction was less self-pitying than the one in the book and was, according to Brooks, "full of a joy of life. She has very deep desires—physical as well as emotional—and she wants to express them."

I saw the movie for the first time when it premiered on TCM a few years ago (maybe 2016?) and I watched it again recently.  The role that Diane Keaton plays in the movie is truly one of the most complex ones ever to be appear in a movie ---- I'm talking much more complex than even Blanche DuBois  ----- and Keaton pulls off the complexities brilliantly.  I'm really surprised she wasn't nominated for an Oscar for this role. 

Yeah, as much as one feels sorry for Blanche DuBois, she isn't that complex a character. I think people form

their opinion of Theresa's character from what they bring with them. Someone like her father would obviously

blame her for what happens to her. Others would not put the blame on her, but on the man who killed her. I

see it mostly as a piece of bad luck, meeting the one guy she may not have met at all if the circumstances were

different. And that she was about to change her life style makes her death even more poignant. 

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