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Body Images on Film


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Recently, I watched a short film on TCM where body images on film were discussed with host Alicia Malone and other film personalities and authors.  I thought it was exceptional.  It's rare to hear a discussion like this.  Film is a reflection of our society and Hollywood has been obsessed with female body image.  I liked that the presenters pointed out how ridiculous it is that really beautiful actresses have been cast in the roles of unattractive characters (Olivia De Haviland in The Heiress is a good example) fearing that if they actually cast a less attractive actress in a role it would make the film unappealing.  The toxic cruelty of judging people by appearance is not critiqued often enough so thank you TCM.  Here's the film link:

 

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46 minutes ago, Toto said:

Recently, I watched a short film on TCM where body images on film were discussed with host Alicia Malone and other film personalities and authors.  I thought it was exceptional.  It's rare to hear a discussion like this.  Film is a reflection of our society and Hollywood has been obsessed with female body image.  I liked that the presenters pointed out how ridiculous it is that really beautiful actresses have been cast in the roles of unattractive characters (Olivia De Haviland in The Heiress is a good example) fearing that if they actually cast a less attractive actress in a role it would make the film unappealing.  The toxic cruelty of judging people by appearance is not critiqued often enough so thank you TCM.  Here's the film link:

 

.EXQUISITE ...

👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏👏

.THANK YOU,. 👏👏👊👏👍

 

I Honestly Wish that was.. ...about twenty-one minutes longer...

_

I Have (also) Found it Fascinating how some Artists and Performers.. ...Sometimes Directors as well..

- Can "Toggle" and "Code Switch" Between Different Auras (of) Characters They Personify on screen... .

 

 James Cagney Immediately Comes to mind with Yankee Doodle Dandy and say.. White Heat... .

. ... ..

This.. ... Might Sound Haughty and Condescending .. ... but Some Directors /Scripts Can Pull this hat trick off as well.. - ... ..though it is on (many more than one) occassion, not necessary ...

 

 

There is one particular scene.. ...approximately half way thru the Exquisite Cloud Atlas.. ... that pulls this off Beautifully...

 

It Flips.. ... from Introspective Fantasy/Drama/SciFi..

 

.. ...to Comedy...

..then back again, at the blink of an eye...

 

 

 

 

 

 

_

I Have Found that some of my Favourite Films Employ Voice-Over..

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2 hours ago, Toto said:

I liked that the presenters pointed out how ridiculous it is that really beautiful actresses have been cast in the roles of unattractive characters (Olivia De Haviland in The Heiress is a good example) fearing that if they actually cast a less attractive actress in a role it would make the film unappealing

I highly doubt the producer of The Heiress, William Wyler,   feared that " if they actually cast a less attractive actress in a role it would make the film unappealing",   instead Wyler cast the actress he felt would be best for the role .  An actress that was the hottest around,  since Olivia had won an Oscar for Best Actress two years before, (To Each His Own)  and was nominated for one with The Snake Pit,  and thus was also a safe bet in terms of box office potential. 

I can't think of any less attractive actress that had the acting chops Olivia had that had anything close to the box office appeal.      Shirley Booth was well known in New York for her solid stage work but she had yet to make a film and studios don't wish to take such risks with "A" level projects.

 

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I agree with Olivia De Haviland's great acting talent (which she exhibits in the film) but the whole story is about a girl who is not attractive and is treated as a person who's only worth is her inheritance.   Olivia De Haviland is gorgeous.   It doesn't make sense.

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I've seen Alicia's body images discussion a few times now and I agree with her comments.  Men, such as Ernest Borgnine in "Marty" and Dom Deluise (I can't remember the movie in the clip) are accepted in spite of their "unattractiveness."  However women have to be reminded over and over that their bodies don't fit the ideal of attractiveness.  In "Shag," one of the characters is actually nicknamed "Pudge" because she was chubby.  At the beginning of the film, we're told that she lost the weight, but she's still "bigger" than the other girls (though she looks fine) and is still called "Pudge."  She's even called Pudge by her friends' parents! That's how deep-seated her nickname is within her social group.  She's constantly reminded that she's bigger than the other girls. 

It's similar to when aging, or even elderly actresses make an appearance and the audiences are reminded how great (or how bad) she looks.  If she looks great, immediately there is speculation of plastic surgery.  If she looks her age, she's mocked for looking older.  If she tries to get plastic surgery and it's noticeable, she's mocked for having gotten plastic surgery. 

Women cannot win when it comes to their appearance.  She's either too fat. Too thin.  Too old. Too plastic looking. She's always "too" something.  

I'm happy that TCM has put together this series and it not only focuses on women, but men as well.  

Men also face many of the same issues, if they're not tall enough, muscular enough, outwardly manly enough, etc. 

Kudos to TCM.

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14 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I've seen Alicia's body images discussion a few times now and I agree with her comments.  Men, such as Ernest Borgnine in "Marty" and Dom Deluise (I can't remember the movie in the clip) are accepted in spite of their "unattractiveness."  However women have to be reminded over and over that their bodies don't fit the ideal of attractiveness.  In "Shag," one of the characters is actually nicknamed "Pudge" because she was chubby.  At the beginning of the film, we're told that she lost the weight, but she's still "bigger" than the other girls (though she looks fine) and is still called "Pudge."  She's even called Pudge by her friends' parents! That's how deep-seated her nickname is within her social group.  She's constantly reminded that she's bigger than the other girls. 

It's similar to when aging, or even elderly actresses make an appearance and the audiences are reminded how great (or how bad) she looks.  If she looks great, immediately there is speculation of plastic surgery.  If she looks her age, she's mocked for looking older.  If she tries to get plastic surgery and it's noticeable, she's mocked for having gotten plastic surgery. 

Women cannot win when it comes to their appearance.  She's either too fat. Too thin.  Too old. Too plastic looking. She's always "too" something.  

I'm happy that TCM has put together this series and it not only focuses on women, but men as well.  

Men also face many of the same issues, if they're not tall enough, muscular enough, outwardly manly enough, etc. 

Kudos to TCM.

What you say is true, but it isn't limited to Hollywood.  Society at large judges people based on their appearance constantly.  To offset some of the criticism, we tend to compensate with newer clothes, a different hairstyle, re-shaping our bodies through diet and/or exercise, etcetera.   This is a good series TCM is doing on the subject, and it also cuts in the other direction too.  People who are physically fit and muscular never think they are big enough, and people who are on target with their weight that's commensurate to their height and age think they are too heavy.  Personal hygiene can be a factor too that keeps people from respecting or gravitating toward those who don't practice it well.

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51 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I've seen Alicia's body images discussion a few times now and I agree with her comments.  Men, such as Ernest Borgnine in "Marty" and Dom Deluise (I can't remember the movie in the clip) are accepted in spite of their "unattractiveness."  However women have to be reminded over and over that their bodies don't fit the ideal of attractiveness.  In "Shag," one of the characters is actually nicknamed "Pudge" because she was chubby.  At the beginning of the film, we're told that she lost the weight, but she's still "bigger" than the other girls (though she looks fine) and is still called "Pudge."  She's even called Pudge by her friends' parents! That's how deep-seated her nickname is within her social group.  She's constantly reminded that she's bigger than the other girls. 

It's similar to when aging, or even elderly actresses make an appearance and the audiences are reminded how great (or how bad) she looks.  If she looks great, immediately there is speculation of plastic surgery.  If she looks her age, she's mocked for looking older.  If she tries to get plastic surgery and it's noticeable, she's mocked for having gotten plastic surgery. 

Women cannot win when it comes to their appearance.  She's either too fat. Too thin.  Too old. Too plastic looking. She's always "too" something.  

I'm happy that TCM has put together this series and it not only focuses on women, but men as well.  

Men also face many of the same issues, if they're not tall enough, muscular enough, outwardly manly enough, etc. 

Kudos to TCM.

I'm surprised they didn't rerun Dogfight for this series.  I think it was shown in the past month or two.

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6 hours ago, Toto said:

It's rare to hear a discussion like this.

Is it really? They seem to be so common lately they have become easily tuned out. 

First. Men do not get a pass. I realize for these issues to have some sticking power they need to be unfair, unevenly applied. Well it's not. Both sexes suffer from whatever stigma  they allow themselves to defined by. Age, weight, bald, whatever.

Second. As Alicia points out Ricki Lake's character in Hairspray rises above this false box she's supposed to limited by.  Sounds like progress has been made! Why? Because she likes herself. 

There will always be some shallow type that continue to be mean. Who the hell cares. You aren't interested in them anyway.

If your goal is to FORCE them to accept and approve you despite you not approving yourself, forget it. 

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Wow!  I really, really disliked this exercise in Woke Cancel Culture.

It tries much, much too hard to scold and lecture us, to which I immediately respond negatively. 

Conflating women with disfigured faces with overweight women messes up the attempt at virtue signaling.  Fat equates to acid being flung at one's face?  Pick a problem to gripe about.

Men are bashed.  Racism is injected.  (Can't help but inject GWTW yet again as a problem,  can you TCM whine-babies?"   Perhaps it needs to pick one issue and explore it intelligently.  Isn't there a "garbage" thread where this could be discarded.  How aggressively fake, phony and fraudulent. 

I reject this entire pathetic,  amateurish scold.  

Alicia, however, is gorgeous and I love her accent.

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7 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

As Alicia points out Ricki Lake's character in Hairspray rises above this false box she's supposed to limited by.  Sounds like progress has been made! Why? Because she likes herself. 

There will always be some shallow type that continue to be mean. Who the hell cares. You aren't interested in them anyway.

Nicely stated, thank you!

When I first saw "Body Images On Film" listed as a TCM spotlight, I thought to myself really? Do we really need to nit pick this injustice now? Then looking at some of the films chosen and thinking of how I felt for the charactors, identifying with them & their situations when watching these films, I thought why not? 

Body Image is often crux of a plot in classic movies that really never occurred to me until grouped together like this. Sure, women suffer more then men because men are judged more by $uccess, their own pressure on top of being good looking.

As for "too pretty" Olivia DeHavilland playing a "plain" looking woman, as many of us know, people who feel inadequate are usually beautiful, sometimes for comedic effect...

th?id=OIP.uV02nsgVRlSo_t-f2QRWIwAAAA&pid

...in the heiress' case, her self image came from years of brainwashing. 

Although I do think this trend of black/gray/blue dressing with zero personal grooming is a horrible way to present yourself to the world. The outside should reflect the inside, inviting others to get to know you. It has nothing to do with what you were born with.

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8 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

Is it really? They seem to be so common lately they have become easily tuned out. 

First. Men do not get a pass. I realize for these issues to have some sticking power they need to be unfair, unevenly applied. Well it's not. Both sexes suffer from whatever stigma  they allow themselves to defined by. Age, weight, bald, whatever.

Second. As Alicia points out Ricki Lake's character in Hairspray rises above this false box she's supposed to limited by.  Sounds like progress has been made! Why? Because she likes herself. 

There will always be some shallow type that continue to be mean. Who the hell cares. You aren't interested in them anyway.

If your goal is to FORCE them to accept and approve you despite you not approving yourself, forget it. 

Yep, in a nutshell...self-confidence. Perhaps the most attractive attribute of them all.

(...and one that's never been gender-specific)

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1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

Nicely stated, thank you!

When I first saw "Body Images On Film" listed as a TCM spotlight, I thought to myself really? Do we really need to nit pick this injustice now? Then looking at some of the films chosen and thinking of how I felt for the charactors, identifying with them & their situations when watching these films, I thought why not? 

Body Image is often crux of a plot in classic movies that really never occurred to me until grouped together like this. Sure, women suffer more then men because men are judged more by $uccess, their own pressure on top of being good looking.

As for "too pretty" Olivia DeHavilland playing a "plain" looking woman, as many of us know, people who feel inadequate are usually beautiful, sometimes for comedic effect...

th?id=OIP.uV02nsgVRlSo_t-f2QRWIwAAAA&pid

...in the heiress' case, her self image came from years of brainwashing. 

Although I do think this trend of black/gray/blue dressing with zero personal grooming is a horrible way to present yourself to the world. The outside should reflect the inside, inviting others to get to know you. It has nothing to do with what you were born with.

Such a Topic.. Can Definitely Be Approached in a Tactful... Classy Way ..

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13 hours ago, Toto said:

I agree with Olivia De Haviland's great acting talent (which she exhibits in the film) but the whole story is about a girl who is not attractive and is treated as a person who's only worth is her inheritance.   Olivia De Haviland is gorgeous.   It doesn't make sense.

I always saw "The Heiress" in a different way. Olivia's character was not so much unattractive as plain. The main attribute that made her unappealing to most men was her mousy seemingly boring personality and bearing. At the end, when she finds her voice, she is much more attractive in different kinds of hair stylings and clothes.  Most people are average looking - thus the meaning of the word "average". So to be attractive you have to bring something else to the table - intelligence, sense of humor, kindness. 

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15 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

 

I can't think of any less attractive actress that had the acting chops Olivia had that had anything close to the box office appeal.      Shirley Booth was well known in New York for her solid stage work but she had yet to make a film and studios don't wish to take such risks with "A" level projects.

 

 

There were probably a LOT of less attractive actresses with Olivia's chops, and  their being less attractive was probably why they had less "box office appeal".   And despite Booth's record of solid stage work , her not being considered all that attractive  was obviously why studios didn't want to take the risks.  

With all this in mind, I wonder how many movies that were considered so-so or mediocre might have been better and/or done better at the box office if cast with less attractive actors or actresses in certain roles. 

Sepiatone

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The parallel to Olivia playing the unattractive daughter in The Heiress: Hollywood tells us that good-looking women are attracted to shy, bespectacled, intellectual men, provided that those men are played by Cary Grant, Gary Cooper, or Henry Fonda.

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16 hours ago, Toto said:

I agree with Olivia De Haviland's great acting talent (which she exhibits in the film) but the whole story is about a girl who is not attractive and is treated as a person who's only worth is her inheritance.   Olivia De Haviland is gorgeous.   It doesn't make sense.

I don't agree that the " whole story is about a girl who is not attractive":    For me it was more than just the girl being average in the looks department:     it is also about a girl that is way too shy,   has no scene of style,  or grace or some of the other "womanly" traits her mother had (as viewed by husband,  the girl's father).    For me that is a major part of the story:  I always get the sense that when her father compares his daughter with her mother,   his disappointed centers more around her bland personality and dullness than just her physical appearance.

Olivia great acting is in the pulling off of out-of-place-clumsy-shy etc... women and thus the casting and overall film in believable,    in spite of Olivia being too-good-looking for the role. 

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9 hours ago, LsDoorMat said:

I always saw "The Heiress" in a different way. Olivia's character was not so much unattractive as plain. The main attribute that made her unappealing to most men was her mousy seemingly boring personality and bearing. At the end, when she finds her voice, she is much more attractive in different kinds of hair stylings and clothes.  Most people are average looking - thus the meaning of the word "average". So to be attractive you have to bring something else to the table - intelligence, sense of humor, kindness. 

So, does 'average' equate to 'non-descript'?   When you hear police descriptions in the movies about a suspect or a victim, they use the term 'average height'.  Is average from the 1940's the same as average in the 1980's or even the 2020's?  Often times, people change their appearance for health reasons or their own aesthetics, and not necessarily due to the dictates of society at large.  Ricki Lake is a good example.  She was heavy when she was on the TV series, "China Beach", but within 5 years of leaving that series and landing her own talk show, she dropped most of that weight and looked like a different person.  However, her personality remained intact (at least, I thought she had the same level of enthusiasm as when she was heavier).

When I was a smoker, my doctor and many of my friends and family members told me I ought to quit, but they never hounded me about it, because they knew I knew it wasn't good for me.  I had a heart attack 3 years ago, but I kept smoking afterwards.  Two years ago, I ran out of cigarettes one night, and I just never got around to going to the convenience store to buy more!  6 months after I quit, I reached a personal best...my highest weight ever.  Since November, 2019, I cut back on my bad eating habits and began working out at home with dumbbells and my own body weight.  My weight loss since then hasn't been that impressive (about 30 pounds), but I've developed muscles on my frame that I never had before.  My initial impetus for losing weight was so my clothes would fit me better, because I was running out of options, and I didn't have the expendable cash to buy a bigger wardrobe for me.   However, once I began to see the changes lifting weights had on my body, I didn't want to stop.  I'm taking a trip to Florida next month, and while I won't be the fittest guy on the beach, I won't be the fattest one either!

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I

20 minutes ago, midwestan said:

So, does 'average' equate to 'non-descript'?   When you hear police descriptions in the movies about a suspect or a victim, they use the term 'average height'.  Is average from the 1940's the same as average in the 1980's or even the 2020's?  Often times, people change their appearance for health reasons or their own aesthetics, and not necessarily due to the dictates of society at large.  Ricki Lake is a good example.  She was heavy when she was on the TV series, "China Beach", but within 5 years of leaving that series and landing her own talk show, she dropped most of that weight and looked like a different person.  However, her personality remained intact (at least, I thought she had the same level of enthusiasm as when she was heavier).

When I was a smoker, my doctor and many of my friends and family members told me I ought to quit, but they never hounded me about it, because they knew I knew it wasn't good for me.  I had a heart attack 3 years ago, but I kept smoking afterwards.  Two years ago, I ran out of cigarettes one night, and I just never got around to going to the convenience store to buy more!  6 months after I quit, I reached a personal best...my highest weight ever.  Since November, 2019, I cut back on my bad eating habits and began working out at home with dumbbells and my own body weight.  My weight loss since then hasn't been that impressive (about 30 pounds), but I've developed muscles on my frame that I never had before.  My initial impetus for losing weight was so my clothes would fit me better, because I was running out of options, and I didn't have the expendable cash to buy a bigger wardrobe for me.   However, once I began to see the changes lifting weights had on my body, I didn't want to stop.  I'm taking a trip to Florida next month, and while I won't be the fittest guy on the beach, I won't be the fattest one either!

I'm glad you quit smoking.  I always liked Ricki Lake s an actress and I'm glad she dropped the weight. Not for body image reasons, it is just that there are not very many obese people over 60, and there is a reason for that. 

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11 hours ago, LsDoorMat said:

I

I'm glad you quit smoking.  I always liked Ricki Lake s an actress and I'm glad she dropped the weight. Not for body image reasons, it is just that there are not very many obese people over 60, and there is a reason for that. 

And here's something that's borderline depressing for a lot of people (if you're in the same boat as I am).  I just checked my statistics on what is considered a healthy look for people, and I, in fact, am considered obese.  I've been overweight most of my life, but in many ways now, I feel like I'm in the best shape of my life too.  I'm 62 and weigh 227 pounds, but I'm only 5-8.  To get to a weight that would be considered normal and healthy, I'd have to get down to 169 pounds (and that's  not happening!).  To get to that specific weight and what would be considered an acceptable body mass index, I'd have to radically alter my diet, and I'm not inclined to do that.  I don't eat a lot of meat really, and my vegetable intake has improved from what it used to be.  Alcohol consumption is light to non-existent for me now, as coffee and water or cranberry juice are the beverages I drink the most.  About the only sweet stuff I have is real maple syrup for those once-a-month pancakes I like to make and honey if I make a cup of green tea.  The home workouts I do are challenging, but not spectacular.  They usually last 50-60 minutes and afterwards, I usually have a protein shake to help supplement the lack of meat that I have.  I also take creatine to help keep some size on my muscles, which for me anyway, have shown some decent growth in my advanced years, but this is fairly common for people that are new to weightlifting, regardless of your age.  People who know me can tell the difference in the way I look now.  My arms and shoulders are more meaty and less boney than they used to be, and my legs are showing less fat on them than in the past.  I've been at this now for 18 months and intend to keep going as long as I can.  When I started out in November, 2019, I tried doing push ups and stopped after doing 7 of them because I thought I was gonna die!  Today, I regularly crank out 100 of them during my workouts (4 sets of 25).  My form isn't the best on my push ups (I don't get down as low as I should), but considering how I was doing them when I started, I'll take any progress that comes my way.

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1 hour ago, midwestan said:

And here's something that's borderline depressing for a lot of people (if you're in the same boat as I am).  I just checked my statistics on what is considered a healthy look for people, and I, in fact, am considered obese.  I've been overweight most of my life, but in many ways now, I feel like I'm in the best shape of my life too.  I'm 62 and weigh 227 pounds, but I'm only 5-8.  To get to a weight that would be considered normal and healthy, I'd have to get down to 169 pounds (and that's  not happening!).  To get to that specific weight and what would be considered an acceptable body mass index, I'd have to radically alter my diet, and I'm not inclined to do that.  I don't eat a lot of meat really, and my vegetable intake has improved from what it used to be.  Alcohol consumption is light to non-existent for me now, as coffee and water or cranberry juice are the beverages I drink the most.  About the only sweet stuff I have is real maple syrup for those once-a-month pancakes I like to make and honey if I make a cup of green tea.  The home workouts I do are challenging, but not spectacular.  They usually last 50-60 minutes and afterwards, I usually have a protein shake to help supplement the lack of meat that I have.  I also take creatine to help keep some size on my muscles, which for me anyway, have shown some decent growth in my advanced years, but this is fairly common for people that are new to weightlifting, regardless of your age.  People who know me can tell the difference in the way I look now.  My arms and shoulders are more meaty and less boney than they used to be, and my legs are showing less fat on them than in the past.  I've been at this now for 18 months and intend to keep going as long as I can.  When I started out in November, 2019, I tried doing push ups and stopped after doing 7 of them because I thought I was gonna die!  Today, I regularly crank out 100 of them during my workouts (4 sets of 25).  My form isn't the best on my push ups (I don't get down as low as I should), but considering how I was doing them when I started, I'll take any progress that comes my way.

Well, if you are eating right and more importantly exercising regularly, then you are doing all you can do. Sometimes I think those numbers as to what is healthy are made strict to increase medical and pharmaceutical profits, not to indicate what is healthy. 

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The film "The Heiress" is based on the classic novel "Washington Square" by Henry James which contains some interesting plot differences.  The movie ends with the heiress (played by Olivia De Haviland) refusing to answer the door when her suitor returns (played by Montgomery Cliff) - her suitor is now financially down on his luck.  The heiress is shown shutting herself off from a social life and spending a lot of time doing needle point.  When Olivia Du Haviland walks up the stairs refusing to answer the door while her returned suitor is frantically knocking, we are lead to think she will live a lonely life as an old maid.  By contrast, in the book, the heiress becomes much more self-confident and independent after she breaks off from her suitor and gets many marriage proposals that she decides not to accept.  She decides she will live happily without being married.  Her suitor returns after many years and now is very heavy and bald.  He proposes but the heiress politely declines.  The character of the heiress is very plain but her inner character changes in the book and she becomes appealing.  Personally, I like the story-line of the book better.  I think the movie portrays the heiress as unattractive and therefore unlikeable and a victim.  Any thoughts?

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3 hours ago, midwestan said:

And here's something that's borderline depressing for a lot of people (if you're in the same boat as I am).  I just checked my statistics on what is considered a healthy look for people, and I, in fact, am considered obese.  I've been overweight most of my life, but in many ways now, I feel like I'm in the best shape of my life too.  I'm 62 and weigh 227 pounds, but I'm only 5-8.  To get to a weight that would be considered normal and healthy, I'd have to get down to 169 pounds (and that's  not happening!).  To get to that specific weight and what would be considered an acceptable body mass index, I'd have to radically alter my diet, and I'm not inclined to do that.  I don't eat a lot of meat really, and my vegetable intake has improved from what it used to be.  Alcohol consumption is light to non-existent for me now, as coffee and water or cranberry juice are the beverages I drink the most.  About the only sweet stuff I have is real maple syrup for those once-a-month pancakes I like to make and honey if I make a cup of green tea.  The home workouts I do are challenging, but not spectacular.  They usually last 50-60 minutes and afterwards, I usually have a protein shake to help supplement the lack of meat that I have.  I also take creatine to help keep some size on my muscles, which for me anyway, have shown some decent growth in my advanced years, but this is fairly common for people that are new to weightlifting, regardless of your age.  People who know me can tell the difference in the way I look now.  My arms and shoulders are more meaty and less boney than they used to be, and my legs are showing less fat on them than in the past.  I've been at this now for 18 months and intend to keep going as long as I can.  When I started out in November, 2019, I tried doing push ups and stopped after doing 7 of them because I thought I was gonna die!  Today, I regularly crank out 100 of them during my workouts (4 sets of 25).  My form isn't the best on my push ups (I don't get down as low as I should), but considering how I was doing them when I started, I'll take any progress that comes my way.

I feel for ya.  I'm in the same boat.  But most of my weight gain is due to lack of mobility in the last few years due to spinal issues and a condition called Lymphedema. Since a mini stroke 7 years ago my diet has consistently  been made up  of "lite" this and that, "fat free" this and that and an extremely low sodium intake.  So the more recent mobility issues can be the only reason for the weight gain me and my doctor can  consider. 

Sepiatone 

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