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It Was Nice to Have Eddie Muller and Film Noir on Last Night


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One thing I had started looking forward to during the week was Eddie and his film noir intros on Saturday night. My wife can tell you, that part of the week on TCM has become my favorite thing. Anyone agree?

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18 hours ago, TopBilled said:

I think Eddie is one of the channel's best hosts.

I agree. It almost seems he is on a different time table from the hosts intros. It seems like the others are aren't two minutes or less while Eddie seems to go a good amount past that. Maybe because Eddie has the midnight EST slot, he gets more room to expand. At times, I like the intros more than the movies.

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2 hours ago, Stallion said:

I agree. It almost seems he is on a different time table from the hosts intros. It seems like the others are aren't two minutes or less while Eddie seems to go a good amount past that. Maybe because Eddie has the midnight EST slot, he gets more room to expand. At times, I like the intros more than the movies.

I think the other hosts are trying too hard to be "influencers." But Eddie just seems to love the films and he loves talking about them. That's the way a classic movie host should be.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 5/30/2021 at 1:25 AM, moira said:

I look forward all week long to Saturday night film noirs with Eddie Mueller.

Another nice intro by Eddie for "Act Of Violence" last Saturday. I don't know if Eddie picks the movie in his Saturday noir slot, but, if he does, I appreciate his choices. Van Heflin, Robert Ryan and Mary Astor really kept my interest in this movie and a film noir style was a good choice in this post war, less than flattering, American soldier portrayal.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 5/16/2021 at 9:00 AM, Stallion said:

One thing I had started looking forward to during the week was Eddie and his film noir intros on Saturday night. My wife can tell you, that part of the week on TCM has become my favorite thing. Anyone agree?

 

On 5/19/2021 at 4:21 PM, Stallion said:

I agree. It almost seems he is on a different time table from the hosts intros. It seems like the others are aren't two minutes or less while Eddie seems to go a good amount past that. Maybe because Eddie has the midnight EST slot, he gets more room to expand. At times, I like the intros more than the movies.

very knowledgeable about almost everything not just his favorite genre.  he is always interesting, always has some gem which is usuallyetotally new to me.  I love the show  and Eddie's contribution.  

how about this for compulsion.  whenever I watch a film noir it is something much more than watching a movie.  I must pause anywhere from10 times to a dozen or more.  if the film was filmed in NY or the city of Angels or wherever I research anything I can concerning  location and the stars of that movie.  eg, I might be watching a film and very early the camera catches Mike's diner or a classy restaurant maybe in Hollywood.  I research it, is that diner still in business and at the same location.  when I get a positive (and I do very often) the movie automatically is more interesting.

maybe one of you can help me with my next task.  Isn't the noir music wonderful and so powerful as to even improve a film noir movie?  well my problem is I am attempting to find film noir music on long playing vinyl and I am having a difficult time.  found one but it is on backorder and may never come to fruition.  a perfect saxophone piece in a smoke filled gangster hang out makes my day.  

 

if one of you has any ideas about this music please share it.  the vinyl part is a deal breaker it must be vinyl.  you would/might think this would be a natural money making bonanza for a business or two or a hundred.  nothing like the beautiful  and haunting noir music in a beautiful made film noir,  especially that glorious saxophone.

 

thanks

 

thanks

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10 hours ago, dante said:

 

very knowledgeable about almost everything not just his favorite genre.  he is always interesting, always has some gem which is usuallyetotally new to me.  I love the show  and Eddie's contribution.  

how about this for compulsion.  whenever I watch a film noir it is something much more than watching a movie.  I must pause anywhere from10 times to a dozen or more.  if the film was filmed in NY or the city of Angels or wherever I research anything I can concerning  location and the stars of that movie.  eg, I might be watching a film and very early the camera catches Mike's diner or a classy restaurant maybe in Hollywood.  I research it, is that diner still in business and at the same location.  when I get a positive (and I do very often) the movie automatically is more interesting.

maybe one of you can help me with my next task.  Isn't the noir music wonderful and so powerful as to even improve a film noir movie?  well my problem is I am attempting to find film noir music on long playing vinyl and I am having a difficult time.  found one but it is on backorder and may never come to fruition.  a perfect saxophone piece in a smoke filled gangster hang out makes my day.  

 

if one of you has any ideas about this music please share it.  the vinyl part is a deal breaker it must be vinyl.  you would/might think this would be a natural money making bonanza for a business or two or a hundred.  nothing like the beautiful  and haunting noir music in a beautiful made film noir,  especially that glorious saxophone.

 

thanks

Nice post. Welcome to TCM City!

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6 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Nice post. Welcome to TCM City!

thanks to another film noir fan.  IMO, they're the best movies ever created by Hollywood.  Even the not so great are good.  The B movies produced almost on a lark still intrigue me.  I probably watched close to 100% of these artistic masterpieces.  Pretty soon I will have entire movie dialogue memorized.

 

funny story when I was just a kid I fell in love with Bonnie and Clyde (not noir) but Faye D was just fabulous.  I probably watched that movie at least on 7 or 8 occasions and actually did memorize most of the dialogue.   I may be mistaken but that may have been the very first or one of the very first movies that exhibited up close and in your face killing with all the gore and blood very obvious.  (the character who jumped on the running board on Clyde's vehicle as he was attempting to escape a crime.)

 

stay well

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19 hours ago, dante said:

maybe one of you can help me with my next task.  Isn't the noir music wonderful and so powerful as to even improve a film noir movie?  well my problem is I am attempting to find film noir music on long playing vinyl and I am having a difficult time.  found one but it is on backorder and may never come to fruition.  a perfect saxophone piece in a smoke filled gangster hang out makes my day.  

 

As a jazz musician and big film noir fan,   I have to say that jazz isn't featured as much in noir as "advertised".      Most of the music was still the standard orchestra music created by a studio's musical director and most traditional.    There are some examples of good jazz in noirs in the 40s (E.g. D.O.A.),  but it wasn't until the 50s or so that crime\noir films really started to use jazz music as a plot device and where jazz musicians were hired to create a score just for the film;  E.g.  The Sweet Smell of Success and even here there is a mix of the standard type of score with an original jazz score:

The film score was composed, arranged and conducted by Elmer Bernstein, but the picture also featured jazz themes performed and recorded by the Chico Hamilton Quintet. The music was published and copyrighted through producers Harold Hecht and Burt Lancaster's own music publishing company

   

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22 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

As a jazz musician and big film noir fan,   I have to say that jazz isn't featured as much in noir as "advertised".      Most of the music was still the standard orchestra music created by a studio's musical director and most traditional.    There are some examples of good jazz in noirs in the 40s (E.g. D.O.A.),  but it wasn't until the 50s or so that crime\noir films really started to use jazz music as a plot device and where jazz musicians were hired to create a score just for the film;  E.g.  The Sweet Smell of Success and even here there is a mix of the standard type of score with an original jazz score:

The film score was composed, arranged and conducted by Elmer Bernstein, but the picture also featured jazz themes performed and recorded by the Chico Hamilton Quintet. The music was published and copyrighted through producers Harold Hecht and Burt Lancaster's own music publishing company

   

thank you James.

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On 6/29/2021 at 4:54 AM, dante said:

 

very knowledgeable about almost everything not just his favorite genre.  he is always interesting, always has some gem which is usuallyetotally new to me.  I love the show  and Eddie's contribution.  

how about this for compulsion.  whenever I watch a film noir it is something much more than watching a movie.  I must pause anywhere from10 times to a dozen or more.  if the film was filmed in NY or the city of Angels or wherever I research anything I can concerning  location and the stars of that movie.  eg, I might be watching a film and very early the camera catches Mike's diner or a classy restaurant maybe in Hollywood.  I research it, is that diner still in business and at the same location.  when I get a positive (and I do very often) the movie automatically is more interesting.

maybe one of you can help me with my next task.  Isn't the noir music wonderful and so powerful as to even improve a film noir movie?  well my problem is I am attempting to find film noir music on long playing vinyl and I am having a difficult time.  found one but it is on backorder and may never come to fruition.  a perfect saxophone piece in a smoke filled gangster hang out makes my day.  

 

if one of you has any ideas about this music please share it.  the vinyl part is a deal breaker it must be vinyl.  you would/might think this would be a natural money making bonanza for a business or two or a hundred.  nothing like the beautiful  and haunting noir music in a beautiful made film noir,  especially that glorious saxophone.

 

thanks

 

thanks

http://www.bernardherrmann.org/articles/misc-torncurtain/

if you look to the right of the article, there are more links and resources to noir music. 

and there's this 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_Noir_(album) Carly Simon's Film Noir, a 1996 album: 

Edit

  1. "You Won't Forget Me" (Kermi Goel, F. Speilman) – 2:52
  2. "Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye" (Cole Porter) – 4:33
  3. "Lili Marlene" (M. David, Norbert Schultze, H. Leip) – 3:41
  4. "Last Night When We Were Young" (Edgar Yip Harburg, Harold Arlen) – 4:42
  5. "Spring Will Be a Little Late This Year" (Frank Loesser) – 3:34
  6. "Film Noir" (Jimmy Webb, Carly Simon) – 3:35
  7. "Laura" (Johnny Mercer, David Raksin) – 4:44
  8. "I'm a Fool to Want You" (Frank Sinatra, Joel Herron, John Wolf) – 3:32
  9. "Fools Coda" (Torrie Zito) – 1:13
  10. "Two Sleepy People" (Frank Loesser, Hoagy Carmichael) – 3:37
  11. "Don't Smoke in Bed" (Willard Robison) – 2:54
  12. "Somewhere in the Night" (Josef Myrow, Mack Gordon) – 3:29
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7 hours ago, moira said:

http://www.bernardherrmann.org/articles/misc-torncurtain/

if you look to the right of the article, there are more links and resources to noir music. 

and there's this 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_Noir_(album) Carly Simon's Film Noir, a 1996 album: 

Edit

  1. "You Won't Forget Me" (Kermi Goel, F. Speilman) – 2:52
  2. "Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye" (Cole Porter) – 4:33
  3. "Lili Marlene" (M. David, Norbert Schultze, H. Leip) – 3:41
  4. "Last Night When We Were Young" (Edgar Yip Harburg, Harold Arlen) – 4:42
  5. "Spring Will Be a Little Late This Year" (Frank Loesser) – 3:34
  6. "Film Noir" (Jimmy Webb, Carly Simon) – 3:35
  7. "Laura" (Johnny Mercer, David Raksin) – 4:44
  8. "I'm a Fool to Want You" (Frank Sinatra, Joel Herron, John Wolf) – 3:32
  9. "Fools Coda" (Torrie Zito) – 1:13
  10. "Two Sleepy People" (Frank Loesser, Hoagy Carmichael) – 3:37
  11. "Don't Smoke in Bed" (Willard Robison) – 2:54
  12. "Somewhere in the Night" (Josef Myrow, Mack Gordon) – 3:29

I would only consider one or two of these song film noir type music.   Clearly not jazz,  but instead pop music of the 30s. 

E.g.  Last Night When We Were Young was a hit by Judy Garland in the late 30s.

 

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I would only consider one or two of these song film noir type music.   Clearly not jazz,  but instead pop music of the 30s. 

E.g.  Last Night When We Were Young was a hit by Judy Garland in the late 30s.

 

Does noir music have to be jazz? Can't it be classical, and why not pop?

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30 minutes ago, moira said:

Does noir music have to be jazz? Can't it be classical, and why not pop?

You do have a point,   but I believe most people associated jazz music with film noir.      E.g.  TCM played the fine French film last night Elevators to the Gallows which features a score by Miles Davis.

I do find some non-jazz songs to be highly associated with film noir like Laura,  but that is because the name of the film was Laura,  the main character was Laura and the song was written for the film by composure David  Raksin.   

Many of the other songs on that Simon album were originally written for Broadway stage plays.   Also there is not much "mystery" or dark type themes in them;  they are romantic songs.   Laura has a haunting,  dream like melody and the lyrics,  while somewhat romantic,   have a theme I can associated with noir.

But again,  you do have a point;   there are no rules and If I implied there were,  that was my mistake.

  

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1 hour ago, moira said:

Does noir music have to be jazz? Can't it be classical, and why not pop?

Thanks for asking. I am glad jamesjazz clarified his points.

Personally I have never associated jazz with noir. In noir hybrids, like GILDA (1946), NORA PRENTISS (1947) and THE RACKET (1951), all of which combine noir and melodrama, we have Rita Hayworth, Ann Sheridan and a dubbed Lizabeth Scott performing numbers that have a big band feel to them, not jazz.

Often noir films were "B" films and the studios just used generic music. They didn't allocate budget for an elaborate musical soundtrack.

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On 7/7/2021 at 3:50 AM, moira said:

http://www.bernardherrmann.org/articles/misc-torncurtain/

if you look to the right of the article, there are more links and resources to noir music. 

and there's this 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_Noir_(album) Carly Simon's Film Noir, a 1996 album: 

Edit

  1. "You Won't Forget Me" (Kermi Goel, F. Speilman) – 2:52
  2. "Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye" (Cole Porter) – 4:33
  3. "Lili Marlene" (M. David, Norbert Schultze, H. Leip) – 3:41
  4. "Last Night When We Were Young" (Edgar Yip Harburg, Harold Arlen) – 4:42
  5. "Spring Will Be a Little Late This Year" (Frank Loesser) – 3:34
  6. "Film Noir" (Jimmy Webb, Carly Simon) – 3:35
  7. "Laura" (Johnny Mercer, David Raksin) – 4:44
  8. "I'm a Fool to Want You" (Frank Sinatra, Joel Herron, John Wolf) – 3:32
  9. "Fools Coda" (Torrie Zito) – 1:13
  10. "Two Sleepy People" (Frank Loesser, Hoagy Carmichael) – 3:37
  11. "Don't Smoke in Bed" (Willard Robison) – 2:54
  12. "Somewhere in the Night" (Josef Myrow, Mack Gordon) – 3:29

thank you

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

There are few  on the planet  who know  more about film noir than Ed Muller. He is a film expert's expert.

When presenting films he also  explains things well in a way that not only film critics and scholars of film noir would understand but 

also lay people just learning about film noir. 

Regarding films he knows his stuff,  no doubt.

 

 

 

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It's always nice to see Eddie.  I look forward to his segments and films more than anything else.  My only complaint is not enough Eddie.

It's an interesting question about noir music.  So many have no music at all, or very little.  Others have everything from zither music,  rhumba, or Nat King Cole.

 

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