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I have now seen a couple of noirs with the Moose Malloy character. The last one had Ward Bond in the role. Even though Ward Bond is my favorite actor, he is no where near as menacing as Mike Mizurki in the role. It seems like Ward, as Malloy, could really hurt you but Mike might scare you to death before even laying a finger on you. The one actor that I could see giving Mizurki a run for his money in the role would be Lawrence Tierney.

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22 hours ago, Stallion said:

I have now seen a couple of noirs with the Moose Malloy character. The last one had Ward Bond in the role. Even though Ward Bond is my favorite actor, he is no where near as menacing as Mike Mizurki in the role. It seems like Ward, as Malloy, could really hurt you but Mike might scare you to death before even laying a finger on you. The one actor that I could see giving Mizurki a run for his money in the role would be Lawrence Tierney.

Ward Bond as Moose Malloy,  the character from the novel Farwell,  My Lovely:    I only know two movie versions,   Murder My Sweet, with Mizurki as Malloy,   and Farwell,  My Lovely  (1975),  with Mitchum as Marlowe and Jack O'Halloran as Malloy.  

PS:  I edited this since I did find the film:   The Falcon Takes Over (1942),  which is very loosely based on the novel.     Bond did play Malloy as you said.

  

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The Falcon Takes Over is one of the better Falcons. I think the way in which it is most dissimilar to the novel is that the upscale playboy/amateur sleuth Falcon has not much in common with the hard-boiled/gritty Philip Marlowe. It's like urbane vs. urban. At least one great line is used in the novel, and all three film versions: "When I like a guy, the ceiling's the limit!" spoken by Jessie Florian (played by Anne Revere, Esther Howard and Sylvia Miles).

Ward Bond's take on Moose Malloy is sort of a comic tough guy, not ideal casting nor one of his greatest performances but I'm sure he delivered what the director wanted. Mike Mazurki, on the other hand, is perfectly cast in Murder, My Sweet and gives perhaps the best performance of his career. His slight Ukrainian/New York accent and deliberate delivery of dialogue serve well, and he is the exact physical embodiment of the Moose Malloy in the novel. 

Jack O'Halloran as Moose Malloy in Farewell, My Lovely does a decent job, especially considering it was his first acting role, I think. His appearance certainly is great. My one quibble is that O'Halloran's walk is a bit of a strut, kind of athletic. Perhaps understandable because he had just retired from boxing? Mazurki on the other hand has no excess motion, which I really like. He portrays potential for violence with his posture and facial expressions. Mazurki's intro, where Dick Powell sees Malloy's reflection in the window of his office... an iconic film noir moment?

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Yeah, I think Mizurki is the stuff nightmares are made of.  Also, I agree that Ward is slightly miscast as he just doesn't give the menace that Mizurki does, maybe just boiling down to size and physcial appearance(Mizurki's cauliflower ear). All in all, these Marlowe/Falcon movies are a lot of fun. George Sanders being somewhat suave does cause a different feel from Dick Powell's rough edged private eye. I am glad for these movies and the casting choices of Bond and Mizurki as they always make any movie involving them interesting to me.

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Not to sidetrack the conversation (too much), but a few nights ago I watched CANYON PASSAGE (1946) a fine western noir by Jacques Tourneur. It's filmed in Technicolor, but don't let that fool you...it's a very dark, gritty western with some heavy themes embedded in the narrative.

Ward Bond plays the main villain (though higher billed Brian Donlevy is also cast as a villain). Bond's very first scene has him trying to steal some gold from Dana Andrews' room. They get into a brawl and Bond goes flying through a window and breaks his leg. 

This doesn't stop Bond. Later he returns to have another confrontation with Andrews and they have a huge barroom brawl. In that particular scene, bottles are smashed, chairs are busted and both men severely beat each other. 

Bond doesn't win the fight, so he leaves town and takes his aggression out on some natives. There is a very chilling scene where Bond sees a pretty native girl skinny dipping in a river with her sister, and he approaches them with a menacing look. It is implied that he is about to rape the girl.

A short time later we find out that Bond did more than rape her, he killed her and her sister. This sets in motion a war between the white settlers and the natives who want to avenge what Bond's character has done. Bond ends up on the run, being chased through the woods. Bond comes upon Andrews and the other white men he had previously alienated, and he begs them for a second chance. They refuse to shelter him, and Bond suffers a gruesome death at the hands of the natives.

Anyway, CANYON PASSAGE shows just how mean and dangerous Bond can be when he's given a chance to play a truly evil man. I think it's his best performance.

Screen Shot 2021-05-22 at 10.15.32 AM

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40 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Not to sidetrack the conversation (too much), but a few nights ago I watched CANYON PASSAGE (1946) a fine western noir by Jacques Tourneur. It's filmed in Technicolor, but don't let that fool you...it's a very dark, gritty western with some heavy themes embedded in the narrative.

Ward Bond plays the main villain (though higher billed Brian Donlevy is also cast as a villain). Bond's very first scene has him trying to steal some gold from Dana Andrews' room. They get into a brawl and Bond goes flying through a window and breaks his leg. 

This doesn't stop Bond. Later he returns to have another confrontation with Andrews and they have a huge barroom brawl. In that particular scene, bottles are smashed, chairs are busted and both men severely beat each other. 

Bond doesn't win the fight, so he leaves town and takes his aggression out on some natives. There is a very chilling scene where Bond sees a pretty native girl skinny dipping in a river with her sister, and he approaches them with a menacing look. It is implied that he is about to rape the girl.

A short time later we find out that Bond did more than rape her, he killed her and her sister. This sets in motion a war between the white settlers and the natives who want to avenge what Bond's character has done. Bond ends up on the run, being chased through the woods. Bond comes upon Andrews and the other white men he had previously alienated, and he begs them for a second chance. They refuse to shelter him, and Bond suffers a gruesome death at the hands of the natives.

Anyway, CANYON PASSAGE shows just how mean and dangerous Bond can be when he's given a chance to play a truly evil man. I think it's his best performance.

Screen Shot 2021-05-22 at 9.04.28 AM

He was also did a film with Dana Andrews,  Swamp Water (1942).   While Bond's role in this film is small he still makes an impact.

 

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I know it was probably fruitful for Bond to show his range as an actor to play a character like this. He was also kind of a bad guy as Moose Malloy. But it is hard to see Bond this way, after the majority of films he did where he often played a gruff, but basically good guy. So many of us have seen a lot of Wagon Train episodes where he was that gruff, but genuinely good guy. However, I guess when you think about it, he is just acting and the audience knows these are fictional forms of entertainment. Nonetheless, it is hard for me to watch good ol' Ward be a bad guy, and apparently a really bad guy in Canyon Passage.

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3 hours ago, Stallion said:

I know it was probably fruitful for Bond to show his range as an actor to play a character like this. He was also kind of a bad guy as Moose Malloy. But it is hard to see Bond this way, after the majority of films he did where he often played a gruff, but basically good guy. So many of us have seen a lot of Wagon Train episodes where he was that gruff, but genuinely good guy. However, I guess when you think about it, he is just acting and the audience knows these are fictional forms of entertainment. Nonetheless, it is hard for me to watch good ol' Ward be a bad guy, and apparently a really bad guy in Canyon Passage.

Sometimes the audience doesn't really know that these are fictional forums of entertainment!     E.g.   the negative letters Fred MacMurray received after his Double Indemnity performance.     Fred did go on to play a few other bad guys (Pushover being one,   a noir with Kim Novak,  and the Caine Munity),    but after Fred and his wife were stopped by an angry fan that he was a "bad guy",   his wife advised him to play only good guys.     This was one of the major reasons he signed with Disney!

 

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I think you have to consider what the audience knew when a certain performance was rendered. In the case of Ward Bond, viewers that saw CANYON PASSAGE in movie theaters in 1946 had no knowledge of Wagon Train which was at least ten years into the future. So when they were watching CANYON PASSAGE they would have been judging his performance on how effective he was as a villain in that particular story without necessarily comparing him to other roles he had done before, and definitely they would not have have been comparing him with later roles since those had not yet occurred.

Another interesting performance of his is in the Republic Pictures western DAKOTA INCIDENT (1955) in which he plays a pompous politician who is traveling on a stagecoach that gets ambushed by natives. He really was a versatile actor, capable of playing a wide variety of types.

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On 5/25/2021 at 8:05 PM, TopBilled said:

I think you have to consider what the audience knew when a certain performance was rendered. In the case of Ward Bond, viewers that saw CANYON PASSAGE in movie theaters in 1946 had no knowledge of Wagon Train which was at least ten years into the future. So when they were watching CANYON PASSAGE they would have been judging his performance on how effective he was as a villain in that particular story without necessarily comparing him to other roles he had done before, and definitely they would not have have been comparing him with later roles since those had not yet occurred.

Another interesting performance of his is in the Republic Pictures western DAKOTA INCIDENT (1955) in which he plays a pompous politician who is traveling on a stagecoach that gets ambushed by natives. He really was a versatile actor, capable of playing a wide variety of types.

Yes, Ward was a versatile actor. And he had to have had a certain degree of humility or how else could he stand the punishment he reportedly went through with John Ford. I suppose he was honored by Ford, in a way, when he basically played Ford, as "John Dodge" in The Wings of Eagles".

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22 hours ago, Stallion said:

Yes, Ward was a versatile actor. And he had to have had a certain degree of humility or how else could he stand the punishment he reportedly went through with John Ford. I suppose he was honored by Ford, in a way, when he basically played Ford, as "John Dodge" in The Wings of Eagles".

Two other films of his I like are GYPSY COLT (1954) where he plays the lead male character opposite Frances Dee, though the horse is really the star. It's a trans-species remake of LASSIE COME HOME (1943) and shows Bond at his tenderest. Then there's A MAN ALONE (1955) another great Republic Pictures "A" western in which Bond plays a bed-ridden man whose daughter may be in danger (Mary Murphy).

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On 5/21/2021 at 7:33 AM, Herman Bricks said:

The Falcon Takes Over is one of the better Falcons. I think the way in which it is most dissimilar to the novel is that the upscale playboy/amateur sleuth Falcon has not much in common with the hard-boiled/gritty Philip Marlowe. It's like urbane vs. urban. At least one great line is used in the novel, and all three film versions: "When I like a guy, the ceiling's the limit!" spoken by Jessie Florian (played by Anne Revere, Esther Howard and Sylvia Miles).

Ward Bond's take on Moose Malloy is sort of a comic tough guy, not ideal casting nor one of his greatest performances but I'm sure he delivered what the director wanted. Mike Mazurki, on the other hand, is perfectly cast in Murder, My Sweet and gives perhaps the best performance of his career. His slight Ukrainian/New York accent and deliberate delivery of dialogue serve well, and he is the exact physical embodiment of the Moose Malloy in the novel. 

Jack O'Halloran as Moose Malloy in Farewell, My Lovely does a decent job, especially considering it was his first acting role, I think. His appearance certainly is great. My one quibble is that O'Halloran's walk is a bit of a strut, kind of athletic. Perhaps understandable because he had just retired from boxing? Mazurki on the other hand has no excess motion, which I really like. He portrays potential for violence with his posture and facial expressions. Mazurki's intro, where Dick Powell sees Malloy's reflection in the window of his office... an iconic film noir moment?

It is funny thinking of the walk/movement/presence of the three various Moose Malloys. All three were high level athletes with Bond a starting lineman on USC's first national championship team, O'Hallaran as a professional boxer and Mazurki as a professional wrestler. I like the casting of two of the three with Bond being not quite big enough or menacing enough, although John Ford at least thought Ward Bond had a big enough rear end that he often featured. I noticed that even in the one Wagon Train episode Ford directed.

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The athletic backgrounds of Bond, Mazurki, and O'Halloran is a very interesting connection. All three had fascinating careers.

Ward Bond deserves his own thread of discussion, he may be the most valuable actor in the history of Hollywood! Who else played as many key roles in as many all-time great films?

In addition to wrestling, Mike Mazurki apparently played college football and basketball at Manhattan College (in bucolic Riverdale in the Bronx, NYC). Supposedly also graduated from Fordham Law School. Can anyone confirm the Fordham Law aspect? That's very interesting, if true. Although everything about Mike Mazurki is interesting.

I have read that O'Halloran played college football and minor league football in the 60's and 70's. Does anyone know if that is true?

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