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What is your favorite "final film"?


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4 minutes ago, Allhallowsday said:

That's correct, and PETER SELLERS reportedly hated that inclusion himself. 

 

I see your point, particularly the title character.  However, there are other remarkable performances.  SELLERS is also remarkable as Claire Quilty, but KUBRICK films after SPARTACUS are quite detached and then maybe uniquely his own vision despite performances.  

Yep, hence the previously mentioned "great auteur" moniker bestowed upon him.

(...btw, didn't know Sellers hated the inclusion of those outtakes...thanks)

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I liked "Madadayo".  It doesn't rank with Kurosawa's best but it's a charming little movie.

I just watched Jacques Demy's last film, "Three Seats for the 26th".  It's a very odd movie in which Yves Montand has a May-December romance with luscious young Mathilda May, has sex with her, then finds out the next day that oops, she's his long-lost daughter.  That sounds like some kind of dark melodrama but in fact it's a light, bubbly, upbeat musical like most everything else he made.  Right after the big reveal Mathilda May reunites Montand with his long-lost girlfriend (her mom), and all three of them go away together.  It's not my favorite final film but I sure did want to see what happened next.

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It's not great, but I'm a fan of Vincente Minnelli's final film, A Matter of Time (1976), featuring his daughter Liza and Ingrid Bergman. In her interview with Robert Osborne Liza recounted that he was in the early stages of Alzheimer's and that the final edit was taken away from him, so that could explain a lot about the film's shortcomings. But there's still a fairly clear vision and a beautifully luminous performance by Ingrid Bergman as a woman caught between her present and her past. It's not the exquisite fairy tale it might have been, but it's one I've enjoyed re-watching. And there's a really good title song; I was surprised that Liza never claimed it and included it in her concerts. (The same for "Old Devil Time" from Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon.) TCM has brought it out a few times, but it's basically a forgotten film, which is a shame.

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Ernst Lubitsch's actual last film "Cluny Brown" is terrific, romantic comedy with Jennifer Jones and Charles Boyer.  He was credited for directing "That Lady in Ermine" even though he died just a week into production and Otto Preminger finished it off.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 6/5/2021 at 11:22 AM, Tony Lockwood said:

Sergio Leone: Once Upon a Time in America (1984)

Charlie Chaplin: Limelight (1952)

Akira Kurosawa: Madadayo (1993)

Limelight wasn’t Chaplin’s final film.

I’d go with L’Innocente by Visconti just off the top of my head.

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On 6/7/2021 at 12:05 AM, Dargo said:

 

Still though and my earlier point being that in Dr.Strangelove, Sellers ability to so believeably"stretch" into those these distinctly different roles in that film seems a far greater feat than what I've always felt was a "one-note" performance as the dolt in Being There.

 

Having read the book and then seeing the movie I'd have to say Sellers'  "one note" portrayal  of Chance was spot on.  No other way to do that character proper justice. ;) 

Sepiatone

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I kinda liked LAURENCE HARVEY's oddball final film:  WELCOME TO ARROW BEACH (1974). 

Harvey directed and starred with his friend Joanna Pettet and recruited a good cast (featuring Meg Foster, Stuart Whitman, David Macklin, Gloria LeRoy and John Ireland).  I expect Harvey was already ill with stomach cancer when this was filmed; he died before it was released.  (NOTE:  Harvey died Nov. 25, 1973 at 45).  

I must mention the theme song to the movie sung on the opening and closing credits "Who Can Tell Us Why?" by Lou Rawls.  

I agreed with Leonard Maltin's review as  "strange but watchable shocker".  

Watch out for edited versions, however.  The movie should run 99 minutes at its full-length and not 85 minutes.  

(I do like A PASSAGE TO INDIA and FAMILY PLOT; seen those a few times each).

One 'final film' I've not seen as of yet is HENRY HATHAWAY's swan song:  The 1974 blaxploitation movie HANGUP.  I never did find a video release of "Hangup" or I'd have bought or rented it to check it out.  

The name of 'Peter Sellers' was mentioned above . . . I very much liked his 1970 UK movie "Hoffman".  Seen it four times.

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At the age of 83, James Stewart made his final film appearance doing voiceover work as the dog sheriff in the animated 1991 film An American Tail 2: Fievel Goes West

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am I the only one who thinks Steve McQueen's last film The Hunter was not that bad?

I'm sorry but I think it has some good moments and does not deserve such a bad rep.

 

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Ironically, this was the first Steve McQueen movie I ever saw, on HBO when I was in about seventh grade. I was vaguely aware he was a big star who'd recently died.

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On 7/8/2021 at 3:59 AM, BamaDillert said:

I’d go with L’Innocente by Visconti just off the top of my head.

I love VISCONTI films, but I've not seen them all.  I would love to see L'INNOCENTE.  

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27 minutes ago, NipkowDisc said:

am I the only one who thinks Steve McQueen's last film The Hunter was not that bad?

It's not that bad.  STEVE McQUEEN did have "star quality" which makes his films often interesting.   Personally, I'm hard-pressed to think of a STEVE McQUEEN film I particularly like... oh yeah, THE BLOB!   PAPILLON

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19 hours ago, cody1949 said:

THE   SHOOTIST with John Wayne.  His greatest performance.

Back on actors... THE SHOOTIST is probably my favorite JOHN WAYNE film, and I like his films!  I'm soft for THE SHOOTIST... RON HOWARD, LAUREN BACALL, and it's his birthday... "what they call false spring..."  I love that movie. 

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