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Natchez "fantasy" southern south short period piece after Long Hot Summer


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Looking for any info on it...lots of fantasy southern belles in period recreations and (seriously) "merry" slaves!

Coudn't find in monthly listings, thought monthly used to include those short in-between pieces.

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It seems TCM has short pieces after movies to fill the time until the next movie. Those pieces often tie to the last movie, but mainly I think those pieces are chosen because of the length of time they have to fill. It may be the piece you saw was kind of "reserved" for a movie like Long Hot Summer and may or may not come up again.

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3 hours ago, RainbowGlow said:

Looking for any info on it...lots of fantasy southern belles in period recreations and (seriously) "merry" slaves!

Coudn't find in monthly listings, thought monthly used to include those short in-between pieces.

It was one of those MGM TRAVELTALKS, this one titled OLD NATCHEZ ON THE MISSISSIPPI. Interesting portrayal of the area that "goes on as it did before the civil war". It's the annual reenactment by the Natchez Garden Club.

The "merry" slaves aren't part of the garden club festivities. A large family is shown enjoying themselves as the narrator says "This old mammy is an ex-slave and she reminds us no retrospect of the pre-war south would be complete without the colored folks who contributed a major part to the music, dancing and folklore of old dixie. Aunt Jenny, now in her late 80s tells us that in spite of sentimental stories to the contrary, no merrier people ever lived than the colored folks of the pre-war south. " 

For what it's worth, many ex-slaves shared Aunt Jenny's point of view. 

VQB2BZz.jpge7MKsLA.jpgCorazbb.jpgkJgc2o8.jpg

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5 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

It was one of those MGM TRAVELTALKS, this one titled OLD NATCHEZ ON THE MISSISSIPPI. Interesting portrayal of the area that "goes on as it did before the civil war". It's the annual reenactment by the Natchez Garden Club.

The "merry" slaves aren't part of the garden club festivities. A large family is shown enjoying themselves as the narrator says "This old mammy is an ex-slave and she reminds us no retrospect of the pre-war south would be complete without the colored folks who contributed a major part to the music, dancing and folklore of old dixie. Aunt Jenny, now in her late 80s tells us that in spite of sentimental stories to the contrary, no merrier people ever lived than the colored folks of the pre-war south. " 

For what it's worth, many ex-slaves shared Aunt Jenny's point of view. 

VQB2BZz.jpge7MKsLA.jpgCorazbb.jpgkJgc2o8.jpg

So I did see and hear this!      I was watching two movies at once,  The Long Hot Summer (TCM) and Laura (MOVIES-TV),   since I have seen both multiple times and channel flipping between the two;    I turn back to TCM and I just caught the comment of "no merrier people ever lived than the colored folks of the pre-war south.".       I didn't catch any of the context this was in only that line.        

 

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6 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I didn't catch any of the context this was in only that line. 

It's presented as a direct quote from the lady with the pipe. 

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5 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

It's presented as a direct quote from the lady with the pipe. 

And thus yet ANOTHER reason why these sort'a things should always have one of those (what is that again?...oh yeah, an) "OCD" that in THIS case should've read:

"The following short subject film which is presented on TCM as a filler between movies, contains an opinion expressed by one "Old Aunt Jenny" and which was not shared by the majority of other ex-southern slaves at the time of this short being made. And furthermore, for anyone today contemplating a move to the modern South, keep in mind that it gets really really REALLY hot and sticky down that way during the summer months, and so be forewarned about THIS too!"

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I'm going to quote a review I saw for this film on IMBD.  This reviewer reflected my thoughts on this film so well.  A better depiction of what slavery was actually like is the excellent film "12 Years a Slave" based on the written story of a person who was kidnapped and made a slave.

 1/10

Doesn't play well in 2021

7 June 2021
This "Documentary" short attempts to paint a sweet, nostalgic picture of the old South. It does so by repeating old White lies. Footage of an old Black woman smoking a pipe is accompanied by the narration, "Aunt Jennie, now in her late '80s, tells us that despite sentimental stories to the contrary, no merrier people ever lived than the colored folks of the pre-war South."

This was probably acceptable in 1939. In 2021, it's cringe-inducing.
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1 minute ago, Toto said:

I'm going to quote a review I saw for this film on IMBD.  This reviewer reflected my thoughts on this film so well.  A better depiction of what slavery was actually like is the excellent film "12 Years a Slave" based on the written story of a person who was kidnapped and made a slave.

 1/10

Doesn't play well in 2021

7 June 2021
This "Documentary" short attempts to paint a sweet, nostalgic picture of the old South. It does so by repeating old White lies. Footage of an old Black woman smoking a pipe is accompanied by the narration, "Aunt Jennie, now in her late '80s, tells us that despite sentimental stories to the contrary, no merrier people ever lived than the colored folks of the pre-war South."

This was probably acceptable in 1939. In 2021, it's cringe-inducing.

LOL!! It's good thing someone ran over there and posted it yesterday so you'd have something to re-post!

Gotta love the way Jenny's story is "White lies".

But it's typical, when someone of color dare says something that contradicts the preferred narrative they are ignored or demonized.

 

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22 hours ago, Dargo said:

And thus yet ANOTHER reason why these sort'a things should always have one of those (what is that again?...oh yeah, an) "OCD" that in THIS case should've read:

"The following short subject film which is presented on TCM as a filler between movies, contains an opinion expressed by one "Old Aunt Jenny" and which was not shared by the majority of other ex-southern slaves at the time of this short being made. And furthermore, for anyone today contemplating a move to the modern South, keep in mind that it gets really really REALLY hot and sticky down that way during the summer months, and so be forewarned about THIS too!"

Dargo, it seems James Fitzpatrick has been taking flack for decades for his positive spin. In a NYT piece from 1971 the writer complains about a TRAVELTALK episode "Picturesque South Africa" because rather than make hay over social issues like apartheid and child labor, Fitzpatrick narrates “all races and creeds are patiently struggling to work out their separate destinies.” and “native grape pickers have the advantage of learning their trade at a early age.”

Never mind apartheid hadn't started yet and children worked with their folks in the fields all over the world, there has to be something sinister here!

Todays snowflakes forget these shorts were shown in theaters before the main feature. People went there to be entertained, to escape their 1937 reality.

However, your Mississippi weather alert should absolutely be a graphic overlay. People gotta be prepared and bring extra underwear!

 

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1 hour ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

FWIW, I'm not a fan of political correctness but even I was taken aback by this short.

What specifically. Was it their big ears?

 

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"I sure wishes we could be slaves agin," Aunt Jenny added. "Those was the good old days. We'd get up

at ten, goes to work around eleven, takes a two hours lunch at twelve and quit round three. Just like

livin' in Oz. We'd sit around the fire nights dancin' and singin' our hearts out,  And lord those big queen

size mattresses we slept on. Don't have nothin' like that now. Masta a kindly man. Sometimes on Sunday

and holidays he's feed us before the dogs. Yes sir, shore do miss those old slavery days. Think we might

get us some kind of law and bring 'em back? I'd vote for that you best believe."

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As with any "political currency" types of issues, I don't really have much to contribute to this thread, except that I did meander across Mississippi with a friend, and we stopped along the Natchez Trace trail and stepped down into it to take a leak.

No cell phone reception for miles.

https://moviecollectoroh.com/pics_to_hotlink_on_TCM/natchez-trace.jpeg

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6 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

Dargo, it seems James Fitzpatrick has been taking flack for decades for his positive spin. In a NYT piece from 1971 the writer complains about a TRAVELTALK episode "Picturesque South Africa" because rather than make hay over social issues like apartheid and child labor, Fitzpatrick narrates “all races and creeds are patiently struggling to work out their separate destinies.” and “native grape pickers have the advantage of learning their trade at a early age.”

Never mind apartheid hadn't started yet and children worked with their folks in the fields all over the world, there has to be something sinister here!

Todays snowflakes forget these shorts were shown in theaters before the main feature. People went there to be entertained, to escape their 1937 reality.

However, your Mississippi weather alert should absolutely be a graphic overlay. People gotta be prepared and bring extra underwear!

 

Yeah, well, even maybe worse than THIS is the one Fitzpatrick did on our old hometown of Los Angeles, circa 1940, ya know Moe.

Every freakin' time in his little short , he pronounces it as "Los ANGLE-us".

And boy I yell ya, that ALWAYS had grated on my ears!

(...I wanna tell the guy, "HEY you damn hick! It's pronounced 'Los AN-gel-us', DUDE!")

;)

LOL

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22 hours ago, Vautrin said:

"I sure wishes we could be slaves agin," Aunt Jenny added. "Those was the good old days. We'd get up

at ten, goes to work around eleven, takes a two hours lunch at twelve and quit round three. Just like

livin' in Oz. We'd sit around the fire nights dancin' and singin' our hearts out,  And lord those big queen

size mattresses we slept on. Don't have nothin' like that now. Masta a kindly man. Sometimes on Sunday

and holidays he's feed us before the dogs. Yes sir, shore do miss those old slavery days. Think we might

get us some kind of law and bring 'em back? I'd vote for that you best believe."

uh huh . . . as if life during reconstruction was like hitting the powerball. Jenny probably went from "eating before the dogs" to eating dog.

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On 6/7/2021 at 10:20 AM, Toto said:

This piece gave an incredibly inaccurate view of slavery.  I'm very disappointed that it was aired on TCM.

I'm somewhat conflicted about this.   Basically I believe political correctness and "cancel" culture is very detrimental to our democracy (even though certain people would be inclined to label me as "a New York City liberal") and I do view it as an Orwellian, totalitarian slippery slope but (being a Libra and inclined to go back-and-forth, lol) I can also see certain benefits as well to create a more inclusive and harmonizing society....yet, the "dark side" of do-goodism can ironically lead to toxic divisiveness and censorship.    I admit it's tough balancing freedom with responsibility.    

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7 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

I can also see certain benefits as well to create a more inclusive and harmonizing society.

For that to work wouldn't one need to be able to accept Jenny's reality as well others with less happy memories? 

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7 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

I admit it's tough balancing freedom with responsibility.    

Eeh! Whaddaya talkin' 'bout here, Bronxie?!

I've NEVER had a problem balancing these two things at ALL!

(...although I suppose it sure is a good thing my parents aren't around anymore to remind me of my teenage years, huh)  ;)

 

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1 hour ago, Moe Howard said:

uh huh . . . as if life during reconstruction was like hitting the powerball. Jenny probably went from "eating before the dogs" to eating dog.

Who even knows where the old bag came from or what her story actually was, or if she was just a shill

for white folks. But even accepting her story as true it just proves that one person got a kick out of

slavery days. Her opinion is in a definite minority. Reconstruction was probably no worse than being

a slave and likely better. Of course it took another century for black people to truly be free to do the

things white people were able to do. Fitzy was a white guy born at the tail end of the 19th century, so

what do ya expect?

I love pc, mostly for the way it drives wingnuts up the wall. :)

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48 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

I love pc, mostly for the way it drives wingnuts up the wall. :)

And your counterparts enjoy watching the sight of an American flag on a pick-up truck send the wingnuts into hysterics. 👍🏻

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1 hour ago, Moe Howard said:

And your counterparts enjoy watching the sight of an American flag on a pick-up truck send the wingnuts into hysterics. 👍🏻

No problem. Just toss a Molotov cocktail at the flag and hope the dopes can put it out before it

reaches the gas tank.

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20 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

For that to work wouldn't one need to be able to accept Jenny's reality as well others with less happy memories? 

Moe, not exactly understanding your post.  (I only had one cup of coffee this morning).  Might you elaborate?  Thanks!

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