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Silent Films' Place in Cinematic History


SweetSue
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Hey everyone!

So to make a long story short I am starting to write a speech about silent film and its significance to the overall history of film to present day cinema for one of my classes and need to gather recent  (oldest being 2 years)  expert sources to cite. I'm on the lookout for some, but please if you know of any feel free to link them, it would be a great help! 

Besides that, please feel free to discuss any thoughts about the silent era and its significance today that you may have!

I look forward to your responses!

-SS

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1 hour ago, SweetSue said:

Hey everyone!

So to make a long story short I am starting to write a speech about silent film and its significance to the overall history of film to present day cinema for one of my classes and need to gather recent  (oldest being 2 years)  expert sources to cite. I'm on the lookout for some, but please if you know of any feel free to link them, it would be a great help! 

Besides that, please feel free to discuss any thoughts about the silent era and its significance today that you may have!

I look forward to your responses!

-SS

While Dialogue Can "Mean" (Almost) Everything in Any Given Film.. ...(With)in Any Given Genre...

 

 

I Find Many x,s... .....that the Real Transcendental Works of Cinematic Art. - Dont Even (Neccesarily) NEED dialogue.. ... (Though it Definitely Helps, On Many Occasions...)..

-

The Films...

- "old", or "new",; that i Really Like.. ...i'll often (at the Very Least) view Twice.. ... ..Once w/Sound (if its a Talkie); and Once Sans Sound..

 

 

...many x's, i,ll catch REAMS Of Unmined Details, (that) i missed...

. ...

_

Also..

 

 

       You Might Like This...

https://m.imdb.com/title/tt1745787/

Its.. .....a (relatively recent) Silent Film (of Sorts) called: theTribe,.

 

      It takes place in ,/at a School for the Deaf. In Russia... ..if i remember Correctly ...

-

Its.. ....... .. EXTRAORDINARY.. (imo),.

- ..But,. .. ...

  ..its GRUELING to Get Thru... ..for Multiple Reasons, .. .that become Clear as the Films MovesOn...

(*its Available ((forFree)) AtPresent, on Pluto.,tv. Tubi,. And Amazon Prime...

..if interested...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Its.. ..... .. Amazing.. imo,.

       .. And (while please take (any of) this w/a grain of sawdust..) -

-- it.. ...Might VeryWell .. ...Work Into A(n) Narrative.. .....Focusing On Silent Film(s) ...

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21 minutes ago, Aritosthenes said:

While Dialogue Can "Mean" (Almost) Everything in Any Given Film.. ...(With)in Any Given Genre...

 

 

I Find Many x,s... .....that the Real Transcendental Works of Cinematic Art. - Dont Even (Neccesarily) NEED dialogue.. ... (Though it Definitely Helps, On Many Occasions...)..

-

The Films...

- "old", or "new",; that i Really Like.. ...i'll often (at the Very Least) view Twice.. ... ..Once w/Sound (if its a Talkie); and Once Sans Sound..

 

 

...many x's, i,ll catch REAMS Of Unmined Details, (that) i missed...

. ...

_

Also..

 

 

       You Might Like This...

https://m.imdb.com/title/tt1745787/

Its.. .....a (relatively recent) Silent Film (of Sorts) called: theTribe,.

 

      It takes place in ,/at a School for the Deaf. In Russia... ..if i remember Correctly ...

-

Its.. ....... .. EXTRAORDINARY.. (imo),.

- ..But,. .. ...

  ..its GRUELING to Get Thru... ..for Multiple Reasons, .. .that become Clear as the Films MovesOn...

(*its Available ((forFree)) AtPresent, on Pluto.,tv. Tubi,. And Amazon Prime...

..if interested...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Its.. ..... .. Amazing.. imo,.

       .. And (while please take (any of) this w/a grain of sawdust..) -

-- it.. ...Might VeryWell .. ...Work Into A(n) Narrative.. .....Focusing On Silent Film(s) ...

Very interesting, thank you for this!

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Of course, silent film should be at the forefront of cinematic history.  Without it there wouldn't have been any cinematic history.   I doubt that at anytime in the early 19-teens anyone thought, "Let's not bother with this 'moving pictures' idea until we figure out a way to get SOUND on this stuff!" 

I can't think of any "significance" that silent film would have today outside of providing basic film making technique information that modern day film makers might like to explore.  In at least the fun in knowing where it's come from and a better understanding of film and it's properties that can also be of some use.  As an amateur photographer I've found it more fun and interesting to learn photography by first learning to use the SLR camera basically.  No TTL meters and other automatic technology.  "Back to basics", so to speak.   But, that's just one guy's opinion....

Sepiatone

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

I can't think of any "significance" that silent film would have today outside of providing basic film making technique information that modern day film makers might like to explore.  In at least the fun in knowing where it's come from and a better understanding of film and it's properties that can also be of some use.  As an amateur photographer I've found it more fun and interesting to learn photography by first learning to use the SLR camera basically.  No TTL meters and other automatic technology.  "Back to basics", so to speak.   But, that's just one guy's opinion....

Have to include German expressionism if you're going to study silents, and I've already mentioned the influence that had on creating MTV music videos, or on introducing special effects or new camera techniques (like slow-motion or light-and-shadow) into a US industry that was still basically shooting a static camera at vaudeville stage plays.

The French also threw a few ideas into the works, with Georges Melies and Abel Gance.

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9 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

silent cinema's place in film history, is at the beginning 🤣

Ah yes. Of course, how enlightening. 🙄It serves a much greater importance than just being "at the beginning", but I appreciate the insight.

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On 6/15/2021 at 8:42 PM, SweetSue said:

Hey everyone!

So to make a long story short I am starting to write a speech about silent film and its significance to the overall history of film to present day cinema for one of my classes and need to gather recent  (oldest being 2 years)  expert sources to cite. I'm on the lookout for some, but please if you know of any feel free to link them, it would be a great help! 

Besides that, please feel free to discuss any thoughts about the silent era and its significance today that you may have!

I look forward to your responses!

-SS

Here's another good reference source for ya here, Sue. If, that is, you've never run across it before.

It's Rich's (long time TCM board member 'scsu1975') "Now Playing 100 Years Ago"  thread that he's had running for over 2 years now in the "Films and Filmmakers" forum section of this website:

NOW PLAYING (100 YEARS AGO) - Films and Filmmakers - TCM Message Boards

 

 

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You should take the time to research D.W. Griffith the father of film.  Today he's considered an evil white man. Nonsense. His time was truly interesting and meaningful, and his contributions to early silent film are tremendous and undeniable. 

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Here's another good reference source for ya here, Sue. If, that is, you've never run across it before.

It's Rich's (long time TCM board member 'scsu1975') "Now Playing 100 Years Ago"  thread that he's had running for over 2 years now in the "Films and Filmmakers" forum section of this website:

NOW PLAYING (100 YEARS AGO) - Films and Filmmakers - TCM Message Boards

Thank you so much, Dargo!

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1 hour ago, JakeHolman said:

You should take the time to research D.W. Griffith the father of film.  Today he's considered an evil white man. Nonsense. His time was truly interesting and meaningful, and his contributions to early silent film are tremendous and undeniable. 

(VERY) Nicely Said,

🍻🥂

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On 6/15/2021 at 10:42 PM, SweetSue said:

Hey everyone!

So to make a long story short I am starting to write a speech about silent film and its significance to the overall history of film to present day cinema for one of my classes and need to gather recent  (oldest being 2 years)  expert sources to cite. I'm on the lookout for some, but please if you know of any feel free to link them, it would be a great help! 

Besides that, please feel free to discuss any thoughts about the silent era and its significance today that you may have!

I look forward to your responses!

-SS

Here Are, for now; two additional.. ..further articles... that You might Find Interesting and/or Worthwhile...

(This First-,One is INCREDIBLY short and brief ..

 

 

 

 

   If Theres Nadda (and,/or Next to No) Interest here,. ..

... Totally Cool,.

   👌👍👍👍

_

https://www.cbr.com/charlie-chaplin-kid-changed-cinema-history/

https://www.nga.gov/film-programs/off-screen-further-readings/restoring-original-orchestrations-for-silent-film.html

🎩.

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12 hours ago, JakeHolman said:

You should take the time to research D.W. Griffith the father of film.  Today he's considered an evil white man. Nonsense. His time was truly interesting and meaningful, and his contributions to early silent film are tremendous and undeniable. 

That really doesn't make him less of an "Evil white man".  Any more than creating great works of art didn't mean Vincent Van Gogh wasn't crazy.  ;) 

Or that creating great music meant that Beethoven wasn't really a jerk.

Sepiatone

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

That really doesn't make him less of an "Evil white man".  Any more than creating great works of art didn't mean Vincent Van Gogh wasn't crazy.  ;) 

Or that creating great music meant that Beethoven wasn't really a jerk.

Sepiatone

I loathe the term 'evil white male'. He was a Southern dixie-crat whose father was a colonel in the confederate army which are better ways to describe him than white or male as of why he was hateful- which he was by most accounts.  He refused to apologize for the racism in TBOAN saying he had nothing to apologize for.  He made the film Intolerance to respond to the criticism but would never apologize.

TBOAN is a film I was hesitant to even display in my DVD collection, so I purposely purchased Oscar Micheaux's Within Our Gates at the same time and have them next to each other.  People always praise TBOAN but I believe both films belong in the same discussion.

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21 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

I loathe the term 'evil white male'. He was a Southern dixie-crat whose father was a colonel in the confederate army which are better ways to describe him than white or male as of why he was hateful- which he was by most accounts.  He refused to apologize for the racism in TBOAN saying he had nothing to apologize for.  He made the film Intolerance to respond to the criticism but would never apologize.

TBOAN is a film I was hesitant to even display in my DVD collection, so I purposely purchased Oscar Micheaux's Within Our Gates at the same time and have them next to each other.  People always praise TBOAN but I believe both films belong in the same discussion.

People often praise TBOAN for it's groundbreaking cinematic techniques and such, but IMHO, as cinematic entertainment I off the bat found it quite boring and an insult to my intelligence,  any racist inferences notwithstanding. 

Sepiatone

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Image result for mary pickford foundation logo

Reflections on D.W. Griffith 

Today, when D.W. Griffith’s name is mentioned, many people think only of the technically brilliant and shockingly racist The Birth of a Nation. In fact, in 1999 the Director’s Guild of America changed the name of their annual D.W. Griffith Award, initiated in the 1950s, to simply Lifetime Achievement Award because, as their president Jack Shea explained, “As we approach a new millennium, the time is right to create a new ultimate honor for film directors that better reflects the sensibilities of our society at this time in our national history.”

Griffith, however, directed over 450 films, including Intolerance, Broken Blossoms and many others that pushed creative barriers. And of course he was Mary Pickford’s first film director. His place in film history can be illuminated by testimonies from his contemporaries, people who knew Griffith and worked with him before he made The Birth of a Nation, and what follows are a few samples of the ways in which he inspired other filmmakers, their casts and crews.

Read More >> https://marypickford.org/caris-articles/reflections-on-d-w-griffith/#

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