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Favorite classic movie dads


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With Father's Day around the corner, I'm thinking about dads and I'd love to know your favorite classic movie dads.

Here's mine:

Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch in "To Kill a Mockingbird" - a patient, loving father that showed respect for his children and was a positive role model.  I love when he tells his daughter Scout, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view… until you climb in his skin and walk around in it.”

I love all the Godfathers in John Ford's American western film "Three Godfathers".  Thieves and rustlers find they'll do almost anything to take care of an infant and carry the infant to the village of New Jerusalem.

Cary Grant in Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House is hilarious as a dad who loses money buying a house that turns out to be a money pit.  His daughters seem to have an upper hand with Blandings.  Here's a breakfast conversation with his daughter that I love.

Betsy Blandings : Ms. Stellwagon has assigned each of us to take a classified ad and write a human-interest theme about it. I found one typical of the disintegration of our present society.

Jim Blandings : I wasn't aware of the fact that our society *was* disintegrating.

Betsy Blandings : I wouldn't expect you to be, Father. Ms. Stellwagon says that middle class people like us are all too prone to overlook...

Jim Blandings : Muriel, I know this is asking a lot, but just one morning I would like to sit down and have breakfast without social significance.

Muriel Blandings : Jim, you really must take more interest in your children's education.

Joan Blandings : Can't squeeze blood from a turnip.

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(Another) Good Thread ToTo ,! ...

👏👏👏🥂👏👏

_

Two IMMEDIATELY Comes to Mind...

 

 

.. ...Though, - --- ..im Not (So) Sure this first one is Neccesarily /"Universally" Considered a Classic..

 

 

  -   John Mills,

and Madam Dorothy McGuire (Sorry. ..i Cheat,.) ,in Swiss Family Robinson...

.

- Gary Cooper,

 

 

 

And, (*ironically enough.. lol); the Lovely Dorothy McGuire ,in Friendly Persuasion...

 

. ... .. .....

Ahnnnd..

 

 

 

..i Might Very Well Return with +More/ ,Additional Paternal (and Perhaps the Occassional Maternal) Nominee(s) as More Invade my brain ..

(already have come back to add and edit, once.. now... 😂)

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2 hours ago, Toto said:

With Father's Day around the corner, I'm thinking about dads and I'd love to know your favorite classic movie dads.

Here's mine:

Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch in "To Kill a Mockingbird" - a patient, loving father that showed respect for his children and was a positive role model.  I love when he tells his daughter Scout, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view… until you climb in his skin and walk around in it.”

I love all the Godfathers in John Ford's American western film "Three Godfathers".  Thieves and rustlers find they'll do almost anything to take care of an infant and carry the infant to the village of New Jerusalem.

Cary Grant in Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House is hilarious as a dad who loses money buying a house that turns out to be a money pit.  His daughters seem to have an upper hand with Blandings.  Here's a breakfast conversation with his daughter that I love.

Betsy Blandings : Ms. Stellwagon has assigned each of us to take a classified ad and write a human-interest theme about it. I found one typical of the disintegration of our present society.

Jim Blandings : I wasn't aware of the fact that our society *was* disintegrating.

Betsy Blandings : I wouldn't expect you to be, Father. Ms. Stellwagon says that middle class people like us are all too prone to overlook...

Jim Blandings : Muriel, I know this is asking a lot, but just one morning I would like to sit down and have breakfast without social significance.

Muriel Blandings : Jim, you really must take more interest in your children's education.

Joan Blandings : Can't squeeze blood from a turnip.

*boy, ..that ..didnt last long... 🤦‍♀️🤦‍♂️😂😂😂😂🤦‍♀️🤦‍♂️🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️😂

_

Here Are Two Others..

...though These (Respectively) Might VERYWell go MUCH More Against the Grain of What is Considered a Classic ...

 

 

..for Various Reasons ...

. ... ..

Mel Gibson in a Rather Gritty, Taut Flick Called ,Blood Father

.

And Viggo Mortensen in a(n) EXQUISITE Feature Called ,Captain Fantastic,.

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I really enjoyed the contrast of the Father & Mother in A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN '45.

If anyone is unfamiliar with the story, it illustrates the contrast of different attitudes adults adopt going through life as seen by a poor first generation Irish girl living in NYC tenements. Her Mother played by Dorothy McGuire is responsible, hard working, no nonsense. Her father played by James Dunn is a freewheeling charmer whom everyone loves, but is completely irresponsible.

Although both of her parents attitudes are valid & important, they illustrate extremes. The brilliant writing of this story shows the importance of Dad's social qualities of valuing love & fun, especially for his children. Sadly, once he becomes serious & responsible, it leads to his downfall.

The Dad I'd most want? Brian Keith in THE PARENT TRAP

8309647eeacf492fcb83826a6a538812--parent

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Spencer Tracy in Father of the Bride

Glenn Ford and Bill Bixby in The Courtship of Eddie's Father

Walter Huston in Yankee Doodle Dandy

Ozzie Nelson and Robert Young

Henry Fonda - for tolerating Jane - he also had a show where he was Opie's Dad?

 

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2 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Spencer Tracy in Father of the Bride

Glenn Ford and Bill Bixby in The Courtship of Eddie's Father

Walter Huston in Yankee Doodle Dandy

Ozzie Nelson and Robert Young

Henry Fonda - for tolerating Jane - he also had a show where he was Opie's Dad?

 

Ron Howard and Henry Fonda were in The Smith Family, largely forgotten today.   It came between Howard's stints on TAGS and Happy Days.

It ran for 1.5 seasons on ABC and came from the same team that did Family Affair and My Three Sons.  It also used similar production techniques as in the other two shows to minimize the amount of time Fonda would have to spend in the studio.

 

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I'm guessing the intent was the Father CHARACTERS that various actors portrayed, NOT the actors as fathers in life.  Which makes the OP pick of Gregory Peck 's ATTICUS FINCH a fine choice and which is also top of my list,  Some others(in no particular order as to rating) would be Thomas Mitchell's TOM SULLIVAN in "The Fighting Sullivans".

SPENCER TRACY in "Father Of The Bride"

CLIFTON WEBB in "Cheaper By The Dozen"

WILLIAM POWELL in "Life With Father".

HENRY FONDA in "Yours, Mine and Ours".

CARY GRANT in "Room For One More".

More to come when or if memory serves.  ;) 

58 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

Ron Howard and Henry Fonda were in The Smith Family, largely forgotten today.   It came between Howard's stints on TAGS and Happy Days.

It ran for 1.5 seasons on ABC and came from the same team that did Family Affair and My Three Sons.  It also used similar production techniques as in the other two shows to minimize the amount of time Fonda would have to spend in the studio.

 

Hey!  I DO remember that show.  Kind of contrived and not well written(most of the time).  And I noticed when A&E, when they had that show BIOGRAPHY, and did Ron Howard's biography, somehow managed to leave mention of that show out of the bio.  Not sure if it was A&E's oversight, or if it was at the behest of Ron Howard.

Sepiatone

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1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

Ron Howard and Henry Fonda were in The Smith Family, largely forgotten today.   It came between Howard's stints on TAGS and Happy Days.

It ran for 1.5 seasons on ABC and came from the same team that did Family Affair and My Three Sons.  It also used similar production techniques as in the other two shows to minimize the amount of time Fonda would have to spend in the studio.

 

 

7 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Hey!  I DO remember that show.  Kind of contrived and not well written(most of the time).  And I noticed when A&E, when they had that show BIOGRAPHY, and did Ron Howard's biography, somehow managed to leave mention of that show out of the bio.  Not sure if it was A&E's oversight, or if it was at the behest of Ron Howard.

Sepiatone

All I remember of the show was that I thought Darleen Carr who played Fonda's daughter in it was cute as hell.

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Fredric March in just one of the many great scenes in The Best Years of Our Lives, and in which in this case he's acting in a fatherly protective manner towards his daughter...

b0494c2f30afe5995f159d82ec1607b1.jpg

(...although on the flip-side of this, I suppose it could ALSO be said of his character in this film that his son would go missing half way through it, and yet he never seemed to care about THAT at all!) ;) 

 

 

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1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

Ron Howard and Henry Fonda were in The Smith Family, largely forgotten today.   It came between Howard's stints on TAGS and Happy Days.

It ran for 1.5 seasons on ABC and came from the same team that did Family Affair and My Three Sons.  It also used similar production techniques as in the other two shows to minimize the amount of time Fonda would have to spend in the studio.

 

I remember that show, I thought it was pretty good. Fonda's father character was a cop, but the early episodes mostly dealt with his family life. They revamped it in the later episodes and started concentrating on his police work.

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Walter Baldwin as Homer's Dad in The Best Years of Our Lives.  The almost wordless scene where he helps Homer get ready for bed, as if this is the most ordinary thing in the world, is so beautifully understated and real.  Such unspoken tenderness and respect between them.

Edward G. Robinson in Our Vines Have Tender Grapes.

Claude Rains in Now, Voyager (even though he doesn't play one in the movie, you can imagine him being a wonderful Dad)

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11 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I really enjoyed the contrast of the Father & Mother in A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN '45.

If anyone is unfamiliar with the story, it illustrates the contrast of different attitudes adults adopt going through life as seen by a poor first generation Irish girl living in NYC tenements. Her Mother played by Dorothy McGuire is responsible, hard working, no nonsense. Her father played by James Dunn is a freewheeling charmer whom everyone loves, but is completely irresponsible.

Although both of her parents attitudes are valid & important, they illustrate extremes. The brilliant writing of this story shows the importance of Dad's social qualities of valuing love & fun, especially for his children. Sadly, once he becomes serious & responsible, it leads to his downfall.

The Dad I'd most want? Brian Keith in THE PARENT TRAP

8309647eeacf492fcb83826a6a538812--parent

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn is one of my very favorite movies.  Your insights about parental relationships in this film our wonderful.  Thanks!  Some amazing acting performances in this film.

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6 hours ago, Dargo said:

Fredric March in just one of the many great scenes in The Best Years of Our Lives, and in which in this case he's acting in a fatherly protective manner towards his daughter...

b0494c2f30afe5995f159d82ec1607b1.jpg

(...although on the flip-side of this, I suppose it could ALSO be said of his character in this film that his son would go missing half way through it, and yet he never seemed to care about THAT!) ;) 

 

 

A fascinating relationship between father and son in this film.  Great choice!

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1 hour ago, Toto said:

A fascinating relationship between father and son in this film.  Great choice!

I've always felt the Rob Stephenson character was really only introduced into the film for two reasons.

First, to show that Teresa Wright's Peggy character wasn't an only child, and secondly to perhaps show a  generation gap possibly forming between March's Al character and with that of his son, and due to the former having recently experienced the horrors of WWII firsthand and with the latter seeming more concentrated upon the future in an atomic age.

And so after he's introduced and has that one little interection with his father, Rob presence isn't required after that in order to move the story along.

(...although and as you may have heard Toto, Rob reportedly WOULD end up being the roommate of another lost and missing son from another family just a few years later...one Chuck Cunningham, originally from Milwaukee, Wisconsin) ;) 

 

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2 hours ago, Dargo said:

I've always felt the Rob Stephenson character was really only introduced into the film for two reasons.

First, to show that Teresa Wright's Peggy character wasn't an only child, and secondly to perhaps show a  generation gap possibly forming between March's Al character and with that of his son, and due to the former having recently experienced the horrors of WWII firsthand and with the latter seeming more concentrated upon the future in an atomic age.

And so after he's introduced and has that one little interection with his father, Rob presence isn't required after that in order to move the story along.

(...although and as you may have heard Toto, Rob reportedly WOULD end up being the roommate of another lost and missing son from another family just a few years later...one Chuck Cunningham, originally from Milwaukee, Wisconsin) ;) 

 

There's another reason for Rob Stephenson's inclusion in the film, and it's a valuable lesson for all parents.

Never give your son a samurai sword and send him to his room. You may never see him again.

Veterans Come Home on Film (or, “Where Have All the Veterans Gone?”) |  EatDrinkFilms.com

"What do ya mean where's my son? Damned if I know. But Rick's . . .'

"Rob, dear."

" , , , Rob's a fine boy. So somebody order me a drink."

"You've got one in your hand, dear."

"What? . . . Hmm, so I have. But not for long, mother. Watch it go down. So who's ordering that drink!?!"

 

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Spencer Tracy in Captains Courageous

Every Best Actor Oscar Winner in Academy Award History - Variety

Okay, he wasn't Freddie Bartholomew's Dad. But he should have been.

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Many people would not consider it a classic movie but: Big Chris in: Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998) exemplifies being a good dad. He takes his son with him when he works, teaches him the finer points of his trade, protects the boy from bad language, governs his son's language and risks all to protect his son. That he is a debt-collector for an underworld boss and infamous pornographer means the boy is exposed to a variety of unsavory situations and odd toys but the son is learning what it means to be a good man in a world of scum.

 

The father in: My Neighbor Totoro (1988) is an excellent father also. I found it quite touching when he gives his full attention to his child's description of her encounter with a magical beastie. He 'knows' there is no such thing but he knows also that it is important to his daughter and it is therefore important to him.

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A tender look at a father/son relationship is in the film The Bicycle Thieves (1948) directed by Vittorio De Sica.  The father needs a bicycle for a job to support his poor starving family and his bicycle is stolen.  He searches for the stolen bicycle with his son.  An amazing film.

bicycle-thieves-player-1920x1080-1024x576.jpg?w=780

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