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Settled. David Janssen is The Fugitive


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15 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

Local stations always have had the freedom (in most cases) to shift programming to a different day or time, especially after videotape became feasible for local stations to own.   

So, it's possible your local affiliate aired it at a different time.

Yeah, good point here, Tex!

Maybe the ABC television network affiliate in Detroit re-scheduled the airings for The Fugitive to coincide with GM's second shift punching out for the night on their timeclocks! 

AND, word WAS that the shop foreman on that shift, "Manny somethin'-or-other", was a big David Jannsen/Fugitive fan too, ya know.

(...and you know how strong and influential the UAW union was back then, don't ya?!)  ;)

LOL

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Yep, have to agree with ya here, Sepia. There was always something about Peppard that was in a way a bit off-putting, wasnt't there. 

(...although maybe less so than how Tom feels about a certain British actor "who shall remain nameless" here if our Canadian buddy might happen upon this thread)  ;)

I don't like George Peppard either, but at least I'll say his name.

The only two performances of his that I liked were as a good ol' southern boy (with a surprising amount of charm) in Home from the Hill, and in How the West was Won. All that charm he showed in Home from the Hill seemed to disappear with that film, as he turned into ONE COLD FISH on screen.

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I never watched The Fugitive TV series but I can honestly say I didn't like the one armed man. (He wasn't very nice to Kirk Douglas).

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10 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I don't like George Peppard either, but at least I'll say his name.

The only two performances of his that I liked were as a good ol' southern boy (with a surprising amount of charm) in Home from the Hill, and in How the West was Won. All that charm he showed in Home from the Hill seemed to disappear with that film, as he turned into ONE COLD FISH on screen.

Yep, and who always seemed to give the impression that he thought his you-know-what didn't stink.

(...YOU know Tom, just like Laur...ahem, excuse me...that British actor!) ;)

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On 6/20/2021 at 9:44 AM, hamradio said:

The original "The Fugitive" was a TV series by which the movie came later.  Both are based on a real life person Sam Sheppard whom doesn't come close to resembling EITHER Janssen or Ford

LGiTHZ0saQTDKhUhmt6dOn7NfXuVr_p_fTwHJmtR

 

Sam-Sheppard-Guilty.jpg

 

He was exonerated in 1966, having been convicted of the 1954 murder of his wife, Marilyn Reese Sheppard.  Like today, he was tried by the media.

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The creators of "The Fugitive" deny that they based their story on Sheppard.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sam_Sheppard

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I watched the Jones/Ford film as a teenager in the theater without knowing it was based on an old show.  Still haven't seen the original series, but in general i'm against remakes.  

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44 minutes ago, Shank Asu said:

I watched the Jones/Ford film as a teenager in the theater without knowing it was based on an old show.  Still haven't seen the original series, but in general i'm against remakes.  

Ya know folks, I'm really starting to hate it when these dang youngins come on here and make me feel old!  ;)

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45 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Ya know folks, I'm really starting to hate it when these dang youngins come on here and make me feel old!  ;)

Well, I'm somewhere between AARP and Medicare territory myself, but I never saw the TV series in its original run either.  I was just 3 when it went off the air, so 9 Central was just a bit past my bedtime.  It didn't enjoy much of a syndication run in my area (stations seemed to prefer half hour shows, except Star Trek).  I only saw a few episodes of it in the early 80s once more cable stations like WTBS came on line.

I do remember my parents reminiscing about it when they saw ads for it in reruns.  I had no idea what this "one-armed man" business was about.

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7 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

Well, I'm somewhere between AARP and Medicare territory myself, but I never saw the TV series in its original run either.  I was just 3 when it went off the air, so 9 Central was just a bit past my bedtime.  It didn't enjoy much of a syndication run in my area (stations seemed to prefer half hour shows, except Star Trek).  I only saw a few episodes of it in the early 80s once more cable stations like WTBS came on line.

I do remember my parents reminiscing about it when they saw ads for it in reruns.  I had no idea what this "one-armed man" business was about.

Then you too are probably too young to remember this Tex, but during the 1960s the ABC television network was perennially in third place ratings-wise, but The Fugitive was one of its few ratings success stories at the time. 

The program actually became a bit of a cultural phenomenon for a few years and witnessed by the fact that the two-part series finale (and as previously mentioned in this thread) would garner the highest ratings ever for a scripted TV program episode up to that time. And of course, made David Janssen a big star on the small screen, but which unfortunately he was never able to parlay into any sort of big screen career.

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3 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

dargo, everyone I knew at the time watched The Fugitive, especially all my girlfriends, we all had a crush on David Janssen. I still remember watching that finale. 

 

So lavender, why do you think, and as I mentioned earlier in this thing, for a while I affected that quick little one-sided grin of his back then?

Uh-huh! I was hoping girls would get crushes on me TOO!!! 

(...hey, it worked for HIM, right?!)  ;)

LOL

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14 hours ago, Dargo said:

Ya know folks, I'm really starting to hate it when these dang youngins come on here and make me feel old!  ;)

Preaching to the choir brother.

I was a moderator on a social media app dedicated to horror movies and books or it was supposed to be.  I'd post about subjects like the Universal monsters and the RKO Val Lewton horror noire movies. Dead silence. Meanwhile the 16 year old majority is posting daily Jason vs. anybody with a chip on their shoulder that would consistently Garner hundreds of responses ( mostly along the lines of "Ferrdy so awzom").

I knew it was time to step away when some little bas... tyke insisted that Tod Browning's Freaks wasn't "real" horror because it didn't have any blood and gore.

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On 6/21/2021 at 1:24 PM, Dargo said:

Yeah, good point here, Tex!

Maybe the ABC television network affiliate in Detroit re-scheduled the airings for The Fugitive to coincide with GM's second shift punching out for the night on their timeclocks! 

AND, word WAS that the shop foreman on that shift, "Manny somethin'-or-other", was a big David Jannsen/Fugitive fan too, ya know.

(...and you know how strong and influential the UAW union was back then, don't ya?!)  ;)

LOL

I dunno 'bout that.  The 2nd shift at the GM plant I worked at(that my Dad got me hired into) ended at 11:30 pm.  Which meant that most of the guys working that shift(as did I when I first hired) probably didn't get home until midnight or so.  And most of those guys headed for the bars anyway and stayed until closing, so it'd mean in the metro Detroit area, the ABC affiliate would have to re-schedule THE FUGITIVE  for a 3-4:00 am  broadcast.  And since back in those days those local affiliates usually "signed off" by 1 or 2:00 am,  it's highly unlikely they would have done that.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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THE FUGITIVE with David Janssen was a must see for me. I was 10-15 yrs old when it was on and as I recall it was always on at 10 pm which was often beyond my bedtime. I remember watching the final episode when they "wrapped it all up" and fingered the one armed man. I don't think that had ever happened before. You know, finishing off the series. MASH did it later. 

How many shows can we name that had a "FINAL" episode that closed out the series? Was Seinfeld's final episode meant to wrap it up? Did Friends do it?

THE FUGITIVE had to be the first. Right?

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48 minutes ago, MrMagoo said:

THE FUGITIVE with David Janssen was a must see for me. I was 10-15 yrs old when it was on and as I recall it was always on at 10 pm which was often beyond my bedtime. I remember watching the final episode when they "wrapped it all up" and fingered the one armed man. I don't think that had ever happened before. You know, finishing off the series. MASH did it later. 

How many shows can we name that had a "FINAL" episode that closed out the series? Was Seinfeld's final episode meant to wrap it up? Did Friends do it?

THE FUGITIVE had to be the first. Right?

I think you're forgetting the final episode of another and slightly earlier series here, Magoo.

Uh-huh, the one for Naked City, and where the producers and with a tip of the cap to this series' title, had all the actors playing cops in NYC's 65th Precinct performing nude. They were all seated behind their desks though, and so any action scenes were nonexistant in this one. Nope, no chasing down any perps on the mean steets of New York in this one.

Now, word is actor Harry Bellaver balked at this at first, but it's said once he got into the spirit of things, he found it a very liberating experience.

(...actually, you might be right, Magoo...I can't recall any previous series to The Fugitive doing a finale...good question)

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2 hours ago, MrMagoo said:

THE FUGITIVE with David Janssen was a must see for me. I was 10-15 yrs old when it was on and as I recall it was always on at 10 pm which was often beyond my bedtime. I remember watching the final episode when they "wrapped it all up" and fingered the one armed man. I don't think that had ever happened before. You know, finishing off the series. MASH did it later. 

How many shows can we name that had a "FINAL" episode that closed out the series? Was Seinfeld's final episode meant to wrap it up? Did Friends do it?

THE FUGITIVE had to be the first. Right?

I think you're correct that it was the first dramatic series to do so, as it had a continuing story line from week to week (unusual at the time, except for the prime time soaps like Peyton Place).

Since most shows' episodes of that era were self-contained rather than continuing from week to week, I suppose they felt there was no need to do a wrap-up at the end.  Of course, a lot of series were cancelled after they had wrapped for a season, so they didn't know it was ending until it was too late.  By the 60s, most shows were down to fewer than 30 episodes a season, and they would finish taping/filming in the early spring, and networks often didn't settle their fall schedules until late spring (usually May).  Shows didn't always go out on their own terms.

Leave it to Beaver had a final episode, which consisted of the family looking through a photo album that was realized by using flashbacks to previous episodes.  I don't recall there being any "big moment" like the family moving or Ward losing his job (whatever that was) or some other device to bring things to an end.

Mary Tyler Moore and The Bob Newhart Show both had episodes that terminated the basic premise of the shows (MTM: most of the WJM-TV personnel getting fired; Newhart: Bob closing his practice, taking a teaching job and moving away from Chicago).  Of course, Newhart's 2nd CBS series had the famous final episode that pointed back to the first show.

After these two, it became more common for a series to have some sort of finale.

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13 hours ago, Dargo said:

I think you're forgetting the final episode of another and slightly earlier series here, Magoo.

Uh-huh, the one for Naked City, and where the producers and with a tip of the cap to this series' title, had all the actors playing cops in NYC's 65th Precinct performing nude. They were all seated behind their desks though, and so any action scenes were nonexistant in this one. Nope, no chasing down any perps on the mean steets of New York in this one.

Now, word is actor Harry Bellaver balked at this at first, but it's said once he got into the spirit of things, he found it a very liberating experience.

(...actually, you might be right, Magoo...I can't recall any previous series to The Fugitive doing a finale...good question)

Naked City was a bit before my time. I remember there was a show called that, but I'm not sure I've ever seen an episode. Thanks for your post. I'll have to Google NC.

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I certainly remember that show.  But never saw the movie before the TV show came out.  But the reruns later on when "retro" TV channels came about are more interesting seen in retrospect.  You see things you didn't bother to notice before or couldn't care less about at the time.  Like  a 30 year old VIC MORROW in one episode, or a still unheard of 23 year old DUSTIN HOFFMAN playing a hold-up man in another.  Just to mention a few.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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On 6/23/2021 at 9:01 PM, txfilmfan said:

Leave it to Beaver had a final episode, which consisted of the family looking through a photo album that was realized by using flashbacks to previous episodes.  I don't recall there being any "big moment" like the family moving or Ward losing his job (whatever that was) or some other device to bring things to an end.

 

The Dick Van Dyke Show had a similar subtle finale where Rob Petrie finished writing a book about his life and had Laura read it  (an excuse to show flashbacks to previous episodes).  In the end, Rob's book got rejected, but Alan Brady bought the rights to it in order to turn it into his next TV series.

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1 hour ago, Stoopnagle said:

The Dick Van Dyke Show had a similar subtle finale where Rob Petrie finished writing a book about his life and had Laura read it  (an excuse to show flashbacks to previous episodes).  In the end, Rob's book got rejected, but Alan Brady bought the rights to it in order to turn it into his next TV series.

Thanks.  I've only seen that episode once.   It's either meta twice over, or like a set of nesting Carl Reiner Russian Easter dolls (you keep getting shows about TV comedy writers...).

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