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A New Discovery For Me in TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE


TomJH
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I have no idea how many times I've seen TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE over the years but it is one of my five favourite films, as you may be able to tell by my avatar.

I watched it again last evening and was surprised to make a new discovery, and that is the unbilled appearance of character actor Clifton Young at the 11:11 mark of the film in the flophouse scene, when it is first visited by Bogart and Tim Holt. He can be overheard in a conversation as Bogart and Holt pass by him, saying, "Streets are full of guys, pushing each other."

In case you're not familiar with Young he was a Warner Brothers character stalwart during the late '40s, possibly best remembered today for playing the guy trying to blackmail Bogart in DARK PASSAGE, which was filmed just before TREASURE. He also appeared with his toothy smile playing an obnoxious type in many of the Joe McDoakes comedy shorts that play on TCM.

Dark Passage (1947) , Film Noir, Clifton Young | Film noir, Film d, Film

This is Young in Dark Passage, for those unfamiliar with his name who may recognize the face

DVD Talk

And here he is with Joe McDoakes (George O'Hanlon)

Of course, an unbilled Jack Holt, Tim's father, also appears in the same flophouse scene in TREASURE, sitting beside Walter Huston, with a couple of lines of dialogue, but I already knew that. Spotting Clifton Young talking a minute or two earlier was the new discovery. Ann Sheridan was reputed to have appeared in the film as a prostitute, a cameo she apparently did as a gag on Bogart, but her scene didn't make it into the final film for whatever reason.

http://www.ann-sheridan.com/images/Pretty woman walking past barbershop 2.png

The hooker passing by Bogart after he emerges from the barber shop is clearly not Sheridan.

I have to wonder, though, if Sheridan ever saw the film. In an interview she gave Ray Hagen in the '60s she thought her unbilled gag bit was in the movie.

Ann Sheridan: I played a hooker. Ray Hagen: You did? Ann Sheridan: I walked down the street in a big fat disguise to see if Bogart would recognize me. There's a shot where he comes out of a bar -- I guess he had the toothpick, he always did, and the hat turned up -- and he passes me and then turns and looks back.
 
Other appearances in the film are made by a young Robert Blake as a lottery ticket seller (Blake is, I suspect, the only cast member still with us today) and, of course, director John Huston appears as an American tourist repeatedly pestered by Bogart's Fred C. Dobbs for a handout in the early Tampico scenes.
 
Stinking badges - Wikipedia
 
By the way, Alfonso Bedoya's Gold Hat bandit never says "We don't need no stinking badges!" in the film, as many people believe. What he actually says, to be fully accurate, is  "Badges? We ain't got no badges. We don't need no badges! I don't have to show you any stinkin' badges!"
 
So anyone else have any feelings  (or anecdotes) about one of Bogart and John Huston's best remembered films?
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Not that I can conjure.  But thanks for that info.  Not only did I never notice Young's appearance in that movie, I had NO IDEA what that actor's name was.  Bugs me every time I watch DARK PASSAGE 'cause I KNEW I've seen that guy before in something, but not sure where.  But now, I'm SURE it wasn't "The Treasure Of The Sierra Madre".  But WHERE?  I guess I'll have to do the google thing.

Sepiatone

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40 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Not that I can conjure.  But thanks for that info.  Not only did I never notice Young's appearance in that movie, I had NO IDEA what that actor's name was.  Bugs me every time I watch DARK PASSAGE 'cause I KNEW I've seen that guy before in something, but not sure where.  But now, I'm SURE it wasn't "The Treasure Of The Sierra Madre".  But WHERE?  I guess I'll have to do the google thing.

Sepiatone

I'm not surprised you didn't recognize Clifton Young in Treasure. Until yesterday, after Lord knows how many viewings, I hadn't either but I recognized him by his voice (since it's difficult to see his face). His appearance in the film is in the first five seconds of this clip as he talks to a group of men in the flophouse ("The streets are full of guys pushing each other.") Jack Holt makes his cameo at the 3:35 mark of this clip as he talks to Huston.

 

 

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Clifton Young has an uncredited role as an irate baseball fan in the Warner film That Way with Women with Martha Vickers,  Dane Clark and Sydney Greenstreet.

Young had a few uncredited roles in WB films during the 40s where he only gets a line or two.    He was under contract with WB and like most contract actors had to be at the lot 5 days a week,  8 hours a day,  regardless if he had a role in a film or not.

Martha Vickers & Sydney Greenstreet - That Way With Women (1947) | American  actors, Hollywood fashion, Marilyn monroe photos

 

 

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6 hours ago, TomJH said:

I have no idea how many times I've seen TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE over the years but it is one of my five favourite films, as you may be able to tell by my avatar.

I watched it again last evening and was surprised to make a new discovery, and that is the unbilled appearance of character actor Clifton Young at the 11:11 mark of the film in the flophouse scene, when it is first visited by Bogart and Tim Holt. He can be overheard in a conversation as Bogart and Holt pass by him, saying, "Streets are full of guys, pushing each other."

In case you're not familiar with Young he was a Warner Brothers character stalwart during the late '40s, possibly best remembered today for playing the guy trying to blackmail Bogart in DARK PASSAGE, which was filmed just before TREASURE. He also appeared with his toothy smile playing an obnoxious type in many of the Joe McDoakes comedy shorts that play on TCM.

Dark Passage (1947) , Film Noir, Clifton Young | Film noir, Film d, Film

This is Young in Dark Passage, for those unfamiliar with his name who may recognize the face

DVD Talk

And here he is with Joe McDoakes (George O'Hanlon)

Of course, an unbilled Jack Holt, Tim's father, also appears in the same flophouse scene in TREASURE, sitting beside Walter Huston, with a couple of lines of dialogue, but I already knew that. Spotting Clifton Young talking a minute or two earlier was the new discovery. Ann Sheridan was reputed to have appeared in the film as a prostitute, a cameo she apparently did as a gag on Bogart, but her scene didn't make it into the final film for whatever reason.

http://www.ann-sheridan.com/images/Pretty woman walking past barbershop 2.png

The hooker passing by Bogart after he emerges from the barber shop is clearly not Sheridan.

I have to wonder, though, if Sheridan ever saw the film. In an interview she gave Ray Hagen in the '60s she thought her unbilled gag bit was in the movie.

Ann Sheridan: I played a hooker. Ray Hagen: You did? Ann Sheridan: I walked down the street in a big fat disguise to see if Bogart would recognize me. There's a shot where he comes out of a bar -- I guess he had the toothpick, he always did, and the hat turned up -- and he passes me and then turns and looks back.
 
Other appearances in the film are made by a young Robert Blake as a lottery ticket seller (Blake is, I suspect, the only cast member still with us today) and, of course, director John Huston appears as an American tourist repeatedly pestered by Bogart's Fred C. Dobbs for a handout in the early Tampico scenes.
 
Stinking badges - Wikipedia
 
By the way, Alfonso Bedoya's Gold Hat bandit never says "We don't need no stinking badges!" in the film, as many people believe. What he actually says, to be fully accurate, is  "Badges? We ain't got no badges. We don't need no badges! I don't have to show you any stinkin' badges!"
 
So anyone else have any feelings  (or anecdotes) about one of Bogart and John Huston's best remembered films?

Really (Really) Really Goode Films are a GOLDMine, of: "WHAT ,?.!!! ,? .. .... Never Noticed THAT Before'.!!!.!.." ..

.. ... .

Might Seem Like Non Sequiturs.  ... MaybeSo.. ...

 

But.. - Then Again ..

 

im FULL of that Stuff... .

.

I,ve Been a MASSIVE Fan of Its A Mad ... Mad World For Years and Years Now..

 

... . Finally Figured Out WHERE the Comedic Leviathan Buster Keaton "is",, (with)in said film,.

.

Also Never Knew .. (or remembered, perhaps..); that the Lovely Desmond Lewelyn (sp) is In Chitty Chitty Bang Bang ,! ... 0.0

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1 hour ago, Ray Faiola said:

And Clifton "Bonedust" Young gave Jackie Cooper and the Gang REALLY bad answers for Miss Crabtree in SCHOOL'S OUT. Then he pulled the old "the money's in the jug" gag when buying molasses from Cooper in HELPING GRANDMA.

I could never get into the Little Rascals shorts though I'm a big fan of other Roach comedy shorts. Nevertheless that's where Clifton Young got his early acting experience.

Clifton Young

I suspect that one of the reasons he isn't better known today among film buffs in that he had such an early (33) tragic death. Also, as an adult actor he did do a lot of uncredited work.

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

I could never get into the Little Rascals shorts though I'm a big fan of other Roach comedy shorts.

 

I'm doing the audio restoration for a new series of Our Gang blu-rays. They're being released in chronological order and are really gorgeous. If you ever decide to give the Rascals a second chance, now is the time!

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9 hours ago, TomJH said:
 
So anyone else have any feelings  (or anecdotes) about one of Bogart and John Huston's best remembered films?

I produced the original soundtrack CD for Rhino Records several years ago. Among Max Steiner's acetate recordings (which was the source material for the album) was a dance band arrangement of his "Pardners" theme. Here it is:

http://www.chelsearialtostudios.com/treasure_pardners.mp3

sierrhin.jpg

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37 minutes ago, Ray Faiola said:

I'm doing the audio restoration for a new series of Our Gang blu-rays. They're being released in chronological order and are really gorgeous. If you ever decide to give the Rascals a second chance, now is the time!

I think the reason I didn't like Our Gang/The Little Rascals growing up is that the copies TV stations received (I assume on 16mm?) were so chewed up and in bad shape with splices and cuts, it made it painful to watch.

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10 hours ago, TomJH said:

I have no idea how many times I've seen TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE over the years but it is one of my five favourite films, as you may be able to tell by my avatar.

I watched it again last evening and was surprised to make a new discovery, and that is the unbilled appearance of character actor Clifton Young at the 11:11 mark of the film in the flophouse scene, when it is first visited by Bogart and Tim Holt. He can be overheard in a conversation as Bogart and Holt pass by him, saying, "Streets are full of guys, pushing each other."

In case you're not familiar with Young he was a Warner Brothers character stalwart during the late '40s, possibly best remembered today for playing the guy trying to blackmail Bogart in DARK PASSAGE, which was filmed just before TREASURE. He also appeared with his toothy smile playing an obnoxious type in many of the Joe McDoakes comedy shorts that play on TCM.

Dark Passage (1947) , Film Noir, Clifton Young | Film noir, Film d, Film

This is Young in Dark Passage, for those unfamiliar with his name who may recognize the face

DVD Talk

And here he is with Joe McDoakes (George O'Hanlon)

Of course, an unbilled Jack Holt, Tim's father, also appears in the same flophouse scene in TREASURE, sitting beside Walter Huston, with a couple of lines of dialogue, but I already knew that. Spotting Clifton Young talking a minute or two earlier was the new discovery. Ann Sheridan was reputed to have appeared in the film as a prostitute, a cameo she apparently did as a gag on Bogart, but her scene didn't make it into the final film for whatever reason.

http://www.ann-sheridan.com/images/Pretty woman walking past barbershop 2.png

The hooker passing by Bogart after he emerges from the barber shop is clearly not Sheridan.

I have to wonder, though, if Sheridan ever saw the film. In an interview she gave Ray Hagen in the '60s she thought her unbilled gag bit was in the movie.

Ann Sheridan: I played a hooker. Ray Hagen: You did? Ann Sheridan: I walked down the street in a big fat disguise to see if Bogart would recognize me. There's a shot where he comes out of a bar -- I guess he had the toothpick, he always did, and the hat turned up -- and he passes me and then turns and looks back.
 
Other appearances in the film are made by a young Robert Blake as a lottery ticket seller (Blake is, I suspect, the only cast member still with us today) and, of course, director John Huston appears as an American tourist repeatedly pestered by Bogart's Fred C. Dobbs for a handout in the early Tampico scenes.
 
Stinking badges - Wikipedia
 
By the way, Alfonso Bedoya's Gold Hat bandit never says "We don't need no stinking badges!" in the film, as many people believe. What he actually says, to be fully accurate, is  "Badges? We ain't got no badges. We don't need no badges! I don't have to show you any stinkin' badges!"
 
So anyone else have any feelings  (or anecdotes) about one of Bogart and John Huston's best remembered films?

Ah yes! The ill-fated actor Clifton Young.

Yep, first, it must have been tough being born with one of those faces ya just wanna punch, AND who died at the tender age of 33 after setting his hotel room on fire after falling asleep while smoking in bed.

(...yep, it sure don't get much more "ill-fated" than THAT, alright)

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2 hours ago, Ray Faiola said:

I produced the original soundtrack CD for Rhino Records several years ago. Among Max Steiner's acetate recordings (which was the source material for the album) was a dance band arrangement of his "Pardners" theme. Here it is:

http://www.chelsearialtostudios.com/treasure_pardners.mp3

sierrhin.jpg

Thanks Ray for giving us access to "Partners," a dance band variation on Steiner's great "Trek" theme that we hear in the film. Treasure of the Sierra Madre has one of my favourite film scores. Steiner was at such a magnificent creative peak at this period in his career. It was only a short while before that he had done his moody, romantic score for The Big Sleep and, soon after Treasure, would come his magnificent Spanish-tinged score for Adventures of Don Juan (this film's romantic theme, in particular, played when Juan shares intimate scenes with the Queen, vibrates with sensitivity and emotion, in my opinion).

As a reminder for some reading this here is Steiner's "Trek" theme from Ray's album.

 

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Ah yes! The ill-fated actor Clifton Young.

Yep, first, it must have been tough being born with one of those faces ya just wanna punch, AND who died at the tender age of 33 after setting his hotel room on fire after falling asleep while smoking in bed.

(...yep, it sure don't get much more "ill-fated" than THAT, alright)

Tragically comparable to the deaths of Butterfly McQueen (a kerosene heater burst into flames) and Linda Darnell (a cigarette, apparently, after she watched one of her old films on TV).

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2 hours ago, Ray Faiola said:

I'm doing the audio restoration for a new series of Our Gang blu-rays. They're being released in chronological order and are really gorgeous. If you ever decide to give the Rascals a second chance, now is the time!

Thanks for that news, Ray. There have been a few DVD releases of Hal Roach comedy talkie shorts in the past few years. Sprocket Vault released the Thelma Todd-Zasu Pitts shorts of 1931-33, while Classic Flix gave us the Thelma Todd-Patsy Kelly Comedy Collection. Back to Sprocket Vault, they have released two volumes of Charley Chase Hal Roach shorts, 1930-31 and 1932-33, with Volume Three, covering the years 1934-36, getting released this August.

Amazon.com: Charley Chase: At Hal Roach: The Talkies Volume 3: Various:  Movies & TV

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2 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Here's an interesting colour photo taken on location. Would anyone know who the lady is beside Walter Huston? Possibly his wife?

The Treasure of the Sierra Madre

Yep, kind'a looks like it might be Walter's third wife Nan Sunderland here, Tom...

4ca8c729594956858ef5d64843e04105.jpg

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26 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Yep, kind'a looks like it might be Walter's third wife Nan Sunderland here, Tom...

4ca8c729594956858ef5d64843e04105.jpg

You may be right, Dargo.

I once visited a renovated three storey brick house that Walter Huston lived in as a boy in Toronto. It's a very impressive structure and had just been for sale for 1.2 million. Apparently Walter's father had had the home built between 1889 and 1890 so I gather he must have had money. There is a plaque in front of the home saying that Huston once lived there.

While I was standing there one of the new owners came out and we briefly discussed Walter's performance in Treasure of the Sierra Madre. He seemed to be very pleased about the origins of his newly purchased home. The Hustons were always interested in their family history. I suggested to him that one day, who knows, Anjelica Huston might come visiting if she ever had to come to Toronto. That thought hadn't occurred to the owner but he seemed pleased at the suggestion.

House of the Week: $1.2 million for a Cabbagetown townhouse with a  Hollywood pedigree

The Hustons lived on the left side of the house.

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One of the interesting (and, for me, surprising) facts that I read on Wikipedia about the making of Treasure was that Walter Huston didn't speak Spanish. John Huston hired a Mexican to repeat some dialogue in Spanish to his father, and Walter memorized them for his scenes in the film.

Boy, did that work for old Howard sounds totally fluent with the language (at least to my non-Spanish speaking ears). I wonder how Arturo or some other Spanish speaking posters feel about the credibility of Walter Huston's Spanish in this film.

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14 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

I think the reason I didn't like Our Gang/The Little Rascals growing up is that the copies TV stations received (I assume on 16mm?) were so chewed up and in bad shape with splices and cuts, it made it painful to watch.

Well, in the 50's and 60's the prints were pretty much uncut (16mm Interstate prints). But when King World bought the package, they first used the Interstate prints but then made new negs from 35mm fine grains. Trouble was, they censored the shorts cutting out virtually all footage showcasing any of the black kids (Farina, Stymie, Cotton, Buckwheat). Two shorts, SPANKY and LITTLE SINNER,were literally cut in half.

But Bonedust (Clifton Young) was left alone!

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13 hours ago, TomJH said:

One of the interesting (and, for me, surprising) facts that I read on Wikipedia about the making of Treasure was that Walter Huston didn't speak Spanish. John Huston hired a Mexican to repeat some dialogue in Spanish to his father, and Walter memorized them for his scenes in the film.

Boy, did that work for old Howard sounds totally fluent with the language (at least to my non-Spanish speaking ears). I wonder how Arturo or some other Spanish speaking posters feel about the credibility of Walter Huston's Spanish in this film.

His Spanish is very good, and not only that, Walter Huston made it believable that Howard would speak Spanish, as if he had plenty of experience of communicating with the locals.

 

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8 hours ago, Arsan404 said:

His Spanish is very good, and not only that, Walter Huston made it believable that Howard would speak Spanish, as if he had plenty of experience of communicating with the locals.

 

It really is a tribute to Huston as a actor that his Spanish sounds so convincing. Most people watching the film wouldn't have a clue that the actor couldn't speak the language and had memorized the sounds of it for his dialogue scenes in the film. All the more reason to be impressed by Huston's magnificent performance.

The Treasure Of The Sierra Madre High Resolution Stock Photography and  Images - Alamy

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