Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

*Complete* TCM 2021 Summer Under the Stars Line-Up


Recommended Posts

I'm going to try to go through and find all the "out of library" films for the month, though I will probably move very slowly and may not finish.

Day One is Bette Davis. Looks like they're showing a whopping 11 Warner Bros. movies, 10 from her days as a contract player in the '30s and '40s and of course Baby Jane, her reunion pic with the studio from '62. The only non-library film I could find is The Star from Fox in 1953. Sorry to say no All about Eve

Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

I'm going to try to go through and find all the "out of library" films for the month, though I will probably move very slowly and may not finish.

Day One is Bette Davis. Looks like they're showing a whopping 11 Warner Bros. movies, 10 from her days as a contract player in the '30s and '40s and of course Baby Jane, her reunion pic with the studio from '62. The only non-library film I could find is The Star from Fox in 1953. Sorry to say no All about Eve

That's too bad about Eve. :(

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Day Two is Richard Burton. Only 10 movies. That was all they could fit in, I guess. The average run time of his movies appears to top two and half hours. There are five MGM entries, two from United Artists and one from Warner Bros. The highlights here are The  Taming of the Shrew from Columbia in 1967 and Anne of the Thousand Days from Universal in 1969. They're limiting themselves to three pairings with Elizabeth Taylor, leaving out Virginia Woolfe and The V.I.P.s, though I'm assuming without looking ahead the latter will be shown on Margaret Rutherford's day.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, sewhite2000 said:

I'm going to try to go through and find all the "out of library" films for the month, though I will probably move very slowly and may not finish.

Day One is Bette Davis. Looks like they're showing a whopping 11 Warner Bros. movies, 10 from her days as a contract player in the '30s and '40s and of course Baby Jane, her reunion pic with the studio from '62. The only non-library film I could find is The Star from Fox in 1953. Sorry to say no All about Eve

THE STAR is in the public domain, so that's a freebie for TCM.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, sewhite2000 said:

Day Two is Richard Burton. Only 10 movies. That was all they could fit in, I guess. The average run time of his movies appears to top two and half hours. There are five MGM entries, two from United Artists and one from Warner Bros. The highlights here are The  Taming of the Shrew from Columbia in 1967 and Anne of the Thousand Days from Universal in 1969. They're limiting themselves to three pairings with Elizabeth Taylor, leaving out Virginia Woolfe and The V.I.P.s, though I'm assuming without looking ahead the latter will be shown on Margaret Rutherford's day.

I think they left out VIRGINIA WOOLF because they needed to save it for George Segal's day. They probably didn't have enough of Segal's films in the Turner library.

And yes, THE VIPS is used for Rutherford's day.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LsDoorMat said:

Some of you are mentioning what is actually playing in August. Is there a link to the schedule, even if it is only partially complete?

https://www.moviecollectoroh.com/nightly/sched-new.htm

Scroll down towards the bottom to get to the beginning of the August schedule.  Last I saw, it was only partially available; but that was a few days ago.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

I'm going to try to go through and find all the "out of library" films for the month, though I will probably move very slowly and may not finish.

Day One is Bette Davis. Looks like they're showing a whopping 11 Warner Bros. movies, 10 from her days as a contract player in the '30s and '40s and of course Baby Jane, her reunion pic with the studio from '62. The only non-library film I could find is The Star from Fox in 1953. Sorry to say no All about Eve

As expected, TCM won't ever show Bette's first film (Bad Sister-1931)  even though it's out there. Probably because it's a Universal film. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, midnight08 said:

As expected, TCM won't ever show Bette's first film (Bad Sister-1931)  even though it's out there. Probably because it's a Universal film. 

I don't think Bad Sister has been restored. I have seen a DVD of it made from a VHS tape. At this point, TCM is not going to show anything that has not been digitally restored. Kino got rights to put out on Blu a bunch of Universal's material, and that includes Paramounts that  Universal owns. Some of  them are  quite obscure, such as 1929's "Thunderbolt". Maybe, they'll eventually restore Bad Sister. 

What is interesting about Bad Sister is that Conrad Nagel and Sidney Fox are billed above Humphrey Bogart and Bette Davis. And they have Davis made up to look like she did in the first 20 minutes of Now Voyager, just ten years younger.  Bette Davis made two other films at Universal before they gave her the boot. She has a bit part in Waterloo Bridge, and she was in Seed. I've never seen Seed although I'm pretty sure it is not lost. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, LsDoorMat said:

I don't think Bad Sister has been restored. I have seen a DVD of it made from a VHS tape. At this point, TCM is not going to show anything that has not been digitally restored. Kino got rights to put out on Blu a bunch of Universal's material, and that includes Paramounts that  Universal owns. Some of  them are  quite obscure, such as 1929's "Thunderbolt". Maybe, they'll eventually restore Bad Sister. 

What is interesting about Bad Sister is that Conrad Nagel and Sidney Fox are billed above Humphrey Bogart and Bette Davis. And they have Davis made up to look like she did in the first 20 minutes of Now Voyager, just ten years younger.  Bette Davis made two other films at Universal before they gave her the boot. She has a bit part in Waterloo Bridge, and she was in Seed. I've never seen Seed although I'm pretty sure it is not lost. 

BAD SISTER was digitally restored. I saw a restored copy of it on YouTube earlier this year. It's in pristine shape.

TCM viewers would appreciate the chance to watch it.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

BAD SISTER was digitally restored. I saw a restored copy of it on YouTube earlier this year. It's in pristine shape.

TCM viewers would appreciate the chance to watch it.

Do you know who restored it? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, LsDoorMat said:

Do you know who restored it? 

I don't recall. My thought was that it might have been restored for a DVD release in another country, or else that it had been restored by someone who owned a nitrate copy. It was in perfect condition. The soundtrack was perfect too.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, TopBilled said:

I don't recall. My thought was that it might have been restored for a DVD release in another country, or else that it had been restored by someone who owned a nitrate copy. It was in perfect condition. The soundtrack was perfect too.

Never mind. I found it - 2020 restoration by an individual named Joe Luca. The problem is he probably doesn't have the rights to this and just did it for the sake of film preservation.  Universal doesn't care much for its old movies outside of its Universal Horror franchise. Example - A dealer at Capitolfest in Rome, NY in 2017 was selling copies of 1931's "Back Street" with John Boles and Irene Dunne. It is much better than the later versions that Universal did restore and TCM had put out on DVD. He told me somebody at Universal had given him a batch of the restored film DVDs and said it likely would never see the light of day. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, LsDoorMat said:

Never mind. I found it - 2020 restoration by an individual named Joe Luca. The problem is he probably doesn't have the rights to this and just did it for the sake of film preservation.  Universal doesn't care much for its old movies outside of its Universal Horror franchise. Example - A dealer at Capitolfest in Rome, NY in 2017 was selling copies of 1931's "Back Street" with John Boles and Irene Dunne. It is much better than the later versions that Universal did restore and TCM had put out on DVD. He told me somebody at Universal had given him a batch of the restored film DVDs and said it likely would never see the light of day. 

Thanks. So are we to assume this Joe Luca person is a collector who probably restored it from a nitrate print?

I think if TCM wanted to air it, they certainly could. It's just a matter of how much they'd have to pay Universal for broadcast rights.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, TopBilled said:

Thanks. So are we to assume this Joe Luca person is a collector who probably restored it from a nitrate print?

I think if TCM wanted to air it, they certainly could. It's just a matter of how much they'd have to pay Universal for broadcast rights.

I have no idea what his source is. He actually says what steps he took in video processing to achieve the result which is impressive. He probably just has the digital copy that is the result of his video processing and actually has no rights to the material whatsoever. Thus, Universal probably does not have access to this restored version and TCM has nobody in authority from whom they can purchase broadcast rights. The odd Universal that has shown up on TCM in the last few years has either been something that Kino restored or something that Universal had restored back when they were burning discs under their Universal Vault brand.  Here's the video I think you saw.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, LsDoorMat said:

I have no idea what his source is. He actually says what steps he took in video processing to achieve the result which is impressive. He probably just has the digital copy that is the result of his video processing and actually has no rights to the material whatsoever. Thus, Universal probably does not have access to this restored version and TCM has nobody in authority from whom they can purchase broadcast rights. The odd Universal that has shown up on TCM in the last few years has either been something that Kino restored or something that Universal had restored back when they were burning discs under their Universal Vault brand.  Here's the video I think you saw.

 

Yes, this is the copy I viewed. As I said it is in perfect shape.

In six years it will fall into the public domain. Yes?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Day Three is Kim Novak, a star who spent a huge chunk of her career at Columbia. TCM can only muster up four of her Columbia movies. They are:

Pushover (with Fred MacMurray, 1954)
Picnic (with William Holden, 1955)
Bell, Book & Candle (with James Stewart, 1958)
The Notorious Landlady (with Jack Lemmon, 1962)

They're also showing Vertigo, her loan-out to Paramount in 1958 that is arguably her most famous role ever and her second pairing with Stewart in the same year.

The other six films are three MGMs, one each from United Artists and Warner Bros. and one from Lopert (which I don't know a lot about but I think falls into the TCM library).

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Day Four is Louis Armstrong. There are 10 scripted films and two documentaries, one about the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival and one a bio of Armstrong. Of the fiction films, three are from MGM, two each from Warner Bros. and United Artists and one from Goldwyn/RKO. The hidden treasures here both have "pennies" in the title: Pennies from Heaven (Columbia, 1936) and The Five Pennies (Paramount, 1959). TCM previously aired the latter when it had a monthly theme of jazz movies sometime in the last year or two. I couldn't catch it when it aired, but I watched it another night on Amazon Prime.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Day Five is Margaret Rutherford. This is interesting, as many of her films were British. TCM has the rights to them I assume through the Criterion Collection or Janus Films or whoever owns them now. But I'm fascinated learning about their original American distributors by combing through imdb. And so we find three films that were originally distributed in the US through Universal-International: The Demi-Paradise (released in the US as Adventure for Two, 1943), English without Tears (released in the US as Her Man Gilby, 1944, I think likely a take-off of the title My Man Godfrey, a Universal release from almost 10 years earlier) and The Importance of Being Earnest (1952). Doesn't mean TCM is paying Comcast right now to air these films; I assume their American theatrical distribution rights have long since expired. Of her other 10 films that are airing, five are from MGM (the four Miss Marple movies and The VIPs), one from United Artists, one from Lopert, and I couldn't find any American distribution information on the others.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Day Four is Louis Armstrong. There are 10 scripted films and two documentaries, one about the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival and one a bio of Armstrong. Of the fiction films, three are from MGM, two each from Warner Bros. and United Artists and one from Goldwyn/RKO. The hidden treasures here both have "pennies" in the title: Pennies from Heaven (Columbia, 1936) and The Five Pennies (Paramount, 1959). TCM previously aired the latter when it had a monthly theme of jazz movies sometime in the last year or two. I couldn't catch it when it aired, but I watched it another night on Amazon Prime.

The "Satchmo" documentary from 1989 is being repeated, meaning it airs twice on Armstrong's day.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Day Five is Margaret Rutherford. This is interesting, as many of her films were British. TCM has the rights to them I assume through the Criterion Collection or Janus Films or whoever owns them now. But I'm fascinated learning about their original American distributors by combing through imdb. And so we find three films that were originally distributed in the US through Universal-International: The Demi-Paradise (released in the US as Adventure for Two, 1943), English without Tears (released in the US as Her Man Gilby, 1944, I think likely a take-off of the title My Man Godfrey, a Universal release from almost 10 years earlier) and The Importance of Being Earnest (1952). Doesn't mean TCM is paying Comcast right now to air these films; I assume their American theatrical distribution rights have long since expired. Of her other 10 films that are airing, five are from MGM (the four Miss Marple movies and The VIPs), one from United Artists, one from Lopert, and I couldn't find any American distribution information on the others.

When the Agatha Christie centennial celebration occurred in October 2020, three of the Rutherford-as-Marple pictures turned up on BritBox, where they remained until the end of the year. For some reason, MURDER AHOY, the last one, was not included. I am glad TCM will be airing all four of these fun "B" films.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...