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Cutting scenes out of movies


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If you like ALLIGATOR (1980) the TV version was released on tape in 1983 by 'Catalina Home Video', a short-lived video company that lasted a year or so.  But during their short time of being in business they put out "Alligator" and somehow got hold of a TV print instead of the theatrical version.  It adds approx. 8½ minutes of footage while only missing about 30 seconds due to bits of gore.   The 'cuss words' -- there's not many -- are overdubbed so that's not a big deal.  I rather enjoy the TV version.    

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@TOTO:  I noted you started a thread about "Original vs. Edited Classic Film Versions" and I thought to bump this thread; if you read some of the posts maybe you'll find some interesting ♦nuggets♦ of info.  Cheers.  

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On 7/1/2021 at 9:09 PM, Mikey48 said:

Cutting Scenes Out of Movies

This bothers me very much.

When I know a scene used to be in a movie and then it's no longer there, it ruins the experience of re-watching that movie for me.

I don't care who it was that removed the scene - whether the original movie company, the distributor, the broadcaster - if I know the movie has been altered since I first saw it, it's abhorrent to me.

I despise censorship.

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Some 'stuff' that gets cut out of movies is not always for reasons of  "objectionable content" (aka:  dirty stuff!). 

That chunk of footage cut from NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD (1968) was not due to gory content, for example.  It was several minutes of dialogue that was clumsily edited out and it makes for an obvious "Jump Cut".  You can't help but notice it. 

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49 minutes ago, Mr. Gorman said:

Some 'stuff' that gets cut out of movies is not always for reasons of  "objectionable content" (aka:  dirty stuff!). 

That chunk of footage cut from NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD (1968) was not due to gory content, for example.  It was several minutes of dialogue that was clumsily edited out and it makes for an obvious "Jump Cut".  You can't help but notice it. 

I don't care what the reason is.

If the movie was released to theaters, I hate when it's changed after that. 

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Justice League was restored to its original 4 hours - not that good a movie to rate it.

Used to be that movies would fit in a certain time frame - especially two short films for a double feature.

On a similar topic - some movies have alternate endings that the ones shown in the theaters (e.g., The Big Sleep and Fatal Attraction)

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Alternate endings are okay as DVD extra features - as are deleted scenes and behind-the-scenes footage. I've enjoyed watching some of them. Can be interesting to see what else was being considered.

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On 7/2/2021 at 11:58 AM, chaya bat woof woof said:

I think that they would edit some of the X-Rated Midnight Cowboy or the male **** hanging out all over the place in The Last Picture Show.  They might just blur them.  

 

Notice you did not mention Sybill Sheperd's full frontal nudity on the diving board scene.  At least I think it was full frontal.

Regardless,  my opinion is that TCM does a very good job of showing movies as best they can.  The problem is what they are able to obtain and the quality of different "cuts."

TCM is still commercial free in that there are no commercials during the movies.

For many movies more editing in the beginning would be a real help.  Not for nudity, language, etc., but simply because the movie is too damn long and therefore too damn boring.  TCM does not do that, but the studios sure could.  Also, very, very, very few movies should be over 120 minutes and most would be better at 90-100 minutes. 

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2 hours ago, ElCid said:

For many movies more editing in the beginning would be a real help. 

I'm against it.

If one doesn't like a movie the way it's made, one doesn't have to watch it. 

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45 minutes ago, 37kitties said:

I'm against it.

If one doesn't like a movie the way it's made, one doesn't have to watch it. 

I'm talking about the director, screenwriter, producer, actors, etc. editing it.  In other words, some movies would be better if they were shorter to begin with.

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4 hours ago, ElCid said:

Notice you did not mention Sybill Sheperd's full frontal nudity on the diving board scene.  At least I think it was full frontal.

Regardless,  my opinion is that TCM does a very good job of showing movies as best they can.  The problem is what they are able to obtain and the quality of different "cuts."

TCM is still commercial free in that there are no commercials during the movies.

For many movies more editing in the beginning would be a real help.  Not for nudity, language, etc., but simply because the movie is too damn long and therefore too damn boring.  TCM does not do that, but the studios sure could.  Also, very, very, very few movies should be over 120 minutes and most would be better at 90-100 minutes. 

With regards to Shepherd and The Last Picture Show:      TCM shows the full scene,  right?     

Anyhow,  if when the other poster used "they" to represent TCM that poster is dead wrong;  I.e. TCM does not edit films.   They may show a film that has been edited but when that is the case it was an official-edit.    I.e.   the copywrite owner did the editing. 

As for this topic:  I see about 3 - 4 different ones related to "cutting scenes".         The first one being that when a movie is created it is not about what scenes to "cut" but instead what scenes to include,  what take of what scene to include and if a scene should be have parts "cut" from it.     I.e.  the final product is a result of many, many different "cuts" that are stitched together.     (this should be obvious but I get the impression  some people think a move starts as some type of whole product and then scenes are altered, cut, changed).

E.g.  the same user used The Big Sleep as an example of a film being "cut";   That is incorrect.   Instead there was an initial version that Warner's released but only for overseas consumption by US service personal.    Warner held on to the film not wishing to release it until the war was over.     During this waiting period Bogie and Bacall got married and Warner had Hawks redo a lot of the movie.     I view both version as two separate products and both "original" in their own right.     (or the war version as a pre-release).

Once a film is release to theaters this because what is know as the "original" release but even here there can be different versions;  E.g. different ending for the overseas market.    These versions are also each "original" in their own right. 

Now we get to were using terms like "cutting" can take place:  removing scenes that were part of the original release to theaters.   This was done to pre-code films re-released to theater after July 1934 (e.g. Mati Hari being a prime example).       It was done when films were shown on T.V.      It was tried by Mormons in Utah (but they were sued by the Directors Guild and told to stop their nonsense).  

As for Directors-Cuts;  I see that some people view these as the "true" version and that the original studio release is the "cut up" version.   This is nonsense.    A Directors-cut version is just another version.     

 

  

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Who is the 'They' you are referring to James and Thy Jazzy Geetar? 

As far as THE LAST PICTURE SHOW . . . I don't recall Cybill being seen 'full frontal' in any version.  I remember her upper frontals being seen + Cybill Buns -- but not Cybill Bush.  🙃  

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Playwrights edit all the time. Tennessee Williams did it. Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest was originally a four-act play, until he cut it (losing at least one character). With films, sometimes you need to shoot more, before you realize what you want to edit.

 

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23 minutes ago, Swithin said:

Playwrights edit all the time. Tennessee Williams did it. Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest was originally a four-act play, until he cut it (losing at least one character). With films, sometimes you need to shoot more, before you realize what you want to edit.

 

"sometimes you need to shoot more"?   My understanding  was  that for "A" production films during the studio-era for the vast majority of films the director shot way more footage then "required";  E.g.  3 or more hours of film that ends up being a 90 minute movie.     (not including re-takes where the editor might splice multiples takes of one scene into what becomes the final one).

I find the editing process to be one of the fairly hidden treasures of film making. 

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1 hour ago, Mr. Gorman said:

Who is the 'They' you are referring to James and Thy Jazzy Geetar? 

As far as THE LAST PICTURE SHOW . . . I don't recall Cybill being seen 'full frontal' in any version.  I remember her upper frontals being seen + Cybill Buns -- but not Cybill Bush.  🙃  

Took one for the team and watched the swimming party scene.   She slips on the diving board as she undresses and remains sitting down on the board.  You only see her nude from the waist up.  Some of the other actresses, however, are seen fully nude from the front for a brief time.

 

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On 9/7/2021 at 7:47 PM, Mr. Gorman said:

Who is the 'They' you are referring to James and Thy Jazzy Geetar? 

As far as THE LAST PICTURE SHOW . . . I don't recall Cybill being seen 'full frontal' in any version.  I remember her upper frontals being seen + Cybill Buns -- but not Cybill Bush.  🙃  

 

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