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Roy Retroactively Recalled


NoShear
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I love that movie! One of the top three baseball movies and one of the best sports movies of all time in my opinion.

I remember the critics were less enamoured with it than I when it was released.  Their biggest gripes as I remember were the ending was the exact opposite of Bernard Malamud's novel, giving it an old fashioned 1930s studio system style ending (movie did it the right way. I hated the ending of Malamud's). The other major bone of contention was the larger than life almost caricaturization (don't know if that's even a word but I'm using it. Me an' Billy Shakespeare baby. Me an' Billy Shakespeare) of the characters into heroes and villains. However that was the whole point of the film. The filmmaker's love of baseball is obvious here. Growing up and becoming a baseball fan of my hometowns Cincinnati Reds Big Red Machine era, I recognize exactly what Levinson, Redford, and the screenwriters were going for. Those guys on the diamond weren't mere mortals, they were honest to God mythic heroes right alongside Achilles, Hercules, Odysseus and Beowulf. They battled daily and we got to witness it in all its splendor. This wasn't a movie about baseball. It was a tribute to the love of Baseball.

And a fine tribute it is.

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3 hours ago, Citizen Ed said:

Re: "I love that movie! One of the top three baseball movies and one of the best sports movies of all time in my opinion."

  You have me wondering what the other two are, Citizen Ed...

 Here are my other two: THE PRIDE OF THE YANKEES (1942) and EIGHT MEN OUT (1988).

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3 hours ago, Citizen Ed said:

Re: "Growing up and becoming a baseball fan of my hometowns Cincinnati Reds Big Red Machine era, I recognize exactly what Levinson, Redford, and the screenwriters were going for. Those guys on the diamond weren't mere mortals, they were honest to God mythic heroes right alongside Achilles..."

  Not wholly unlike Achilles, an "arrow" found Johnny Bench shortly after his second MVP season, but he remains mythical.

 Here the god of catchers is seen rounding third - note the beautiful base - following the first of what would be four 2-run homers seen in the awesome power display that was the 1971 All-Star Game:

                                                                                                  1536861959_1971AllStarGameBase(1).png.0d75622692f555145bdf436543c27238.png

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3 hours ago, Citizen Ed said:

I love that movie! One of the top three baseball movies and one of the best sports movies of all time in my opinion.

I remember the critics were less enamoured with it than I when it was released.  Their biggest gripes as I remember were the ending was the exact opposite of Bernard Malamud's novel, giving it an old fashioned 1930s studio system style ending (movie did it the right way. I hated the ending of Malamud's). The other major bone of contention was the larger than life almost caricaturization (don't know if that's even a word but I'm using it. Me an' Billy Shakespeare baby. Me an' Billy Shakespeare) of the characters into heroes and villains. However that was the whole point of the film. The filmmaker's love of baseball is obvious here. Growing up and becoming a baseball fan of my hometowns Cincinnati Reds Big Red Machine era, I recognize exactly what Levinson, Redford, and the screenwriters were going for. Those guys on the diamond weren't mere mortals, they were honest to God mythic heroes right alongside Achilles, Hercules, Odysseus and Beowulf. They battled daily and we got to witness it in all its splendor. This wasn't a movie about baseball. It was a tribute to the love of Baseball.

And a fine tribute it is.

I didn't read Malamaud's book until after I saw the movie.  But I'm with ya on this.  Malamaud's Hobbs was a self centered jerk, compared to  Towne and Dusenberry's adaptation making him a likable and all around nice guy but not one to be reckoned with.  A favorite movie of mine too, Ed. 

And SHEAR... I remember that game.  Happened at my home team's house!  ;) 

Sepiatone

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31 minutes ago, NoShear said:

  You have me wondering what the other two are, Citizen Ed...

 Here are my other two: THE PRIDE OF THE YANKEES (1942) and EIGHT MEN OUT (1988).

Pride was definitely on my list but I was thinking Field of Dreams  to round out the top three. More I consider it though, I'd say you nailed it! Eight Men Out, even though it was about a dark spot on the game, had one of the best casts I've seen in movies. Everyone played their roles perfectly! Yeah, I'm going with your three too.

There's been a lot of really well done baseball movies made. Field of Dreams, A League of Their Own, Major League, Bull Durham, the list of great ones goes on and on. Definitely more than any other sport. Boxing would probably be the closest and it's way back in the race.

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19 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

I didn't read Malamaud's book until after I saw the movie.  But I'm with ya on this.  Malamaud's Hobbs was a self centered jerk, compared to  Towne and Dusenberry's adaptation making him a likable and all around nice guy but not one to be reckoned with.  A favorite movie of mine too, Ed. 

And SHEAR... I remember that game.  Happened at my home team's house!  ;) 

Sepiatone

Same. I saw the movie and almost ran to the library to find the book.  I almost felt like tearing pages out and replacing them with hand written "good parts". 

I think Babe Ruth must've puked a hot dog on Malamud when he was trying to get an autograph or something.  Somebody in the sport had to have hurt him as a kid to write a book that cynical.

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2 hours ago, Citizen Ed said:

Same. I saw the movie and almost ran to the library to find the book.  I almost felt like tearing pages out and replacing them with hand written "good parts". 

I think Babe Ruth must've puked a hot dog on Malamud when he was trying to get an autograph or something.  Somebody in the sport had to have hurt him as a kid to write a book that cynical.

OR maybe Ed, he once met Leo Durocher somewhere along the line!  ;)

(...that would have probably done it too)

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