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The Sheer Pleasure Of Escapism and Those Errol Flynn Epics Of The Movies


TomJH
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I can still well recall a summer job I had as a youth working in a factory. The job was a simple one and it was for a full eight hours every day, shovelling dirt and minerals into a kiln. Simple as the job was it was also an exceedingly dirty one. The minerals, with the rotation of that kiln, hung literally like a dark cloud over our heads as we shovelled this mess into it. Everything would be covered with dirt and grime. Blowing one's nose produced a black product such as I would, thankfully, never see again after I quit the job. At the completion of the day's work, of course,  there was always the big shower. Even then for some time I could never quite get rid of a dark ring under my eyes. It looked like I was wearing mascara.

One day when a workmate (Pete, I think his name was) and I were once shovelling this endless ghastly supply of dirt and minerals the topic of The Adventures of Robin Hood was surprisingly brought up by him. He said that he had always enjoyed the film as a kid but, because of his black and white television, had no idea that it was a colour film. He said that seeing the film for the first time in colour made it a new viewing experience for him. So there we were, shovelling this crap, but at the same time losing ourselves with memories going back to the lush Technicolor greens of Sherwood Forest as we talked of Robin (Errol Flynn) meeting Little John (Alan Hale) for the first time on that fallen log over the creek.

Little John and Robin meet on the bridge in The Adventures of Robin Hood (  1938 ) | Robin hood, Robin, Adventure

Years later at clean job far removed from shovelling stuff into a kiln I met another guy, Jim. Jim had had a hard life, but he had been a successful amateur boxer, undefeated after 50 contests, actually winning either the lightweight or welterweight (I forget which) Golden Gloves. He had a dream of turning professional but suffered a bad cut over one eye in his 50th bout (given to him when his opponent ran across the ring while they were awaiting the decision,which Jim won, and giving him a vicious head butt). Jimmy lost his next bout when that cut was re-opened and a doctor told him that he would never be able to box again as the skin over that eye was thin as tissue paper. The guy who fouled him with a head butt after the match, by the way, was a Montreal tough guy Gaetan Hart, who later became a professional boxer, eventually losing a gutsy title match to the legendary Aaron Pryor ( I'm sure Jimmy enjoyed very punch Pryor landed on him).

With his boxing dreams over Jimmy then lived for ten years or so on the streets and there he saw all the meanness there was to see there. He became known as a local tough guy, though he told me he never picked on anyone. People came to him for protection from others. Knowing Jimmy, I could well believe this. Tough guy or not he was also a sweetheart with a big heart. But the streets lead to drug addiction for him and, his biggest lifelong battle, alcoholism. When I first met Jim he hadn't touched a drop in ten years and was going to AA meetings on a weekly basis.

Jimmy and I talked about the streets and boxing a lot but one day I brought up a new topic, movies, asking him if he had any favourite actors. "Well, I always kinda liked Errol Flynn" he said, much to my surprise, and then made specific reference to the enjoyment he had received from watching Captain Blood and those tall sailing vessels in a long ago Caribbean Ocean.

model ships in the cinema: Captain Blood 1935

There's nothing new in talking about the pleasures of escapism that the movies can bring us, but these are a pair of specific illustrations of that pleasure in unpleasant (my case) or harsh circumstances (Jimmy's).

Errol Flynn's big budget adventure films made at Warner Brothers have always been a source of particular enjoyment for me, with the elegance and dynamic appeal of the best of those often stirring epics, combined, of course, with the winning combination of athleticism, devil may care charm and light heartedness that Flynn could bring to his roles, making them all seem, at least during his prime years before his self destructive lifestyle took its toll, like such a lark.

And it was good to see that my love for Flynn and, in particular, the films of his pinnacle years as a film star was shared by some others that I've known, including a guy shovelling minerals into a kiln and a tough guy seeing the meanness of the streets.

Any other Flynn fans here care to comment?

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I'm a huge fan of Flynn's.  He was a good actor who gave good performances but when he teamed up with director Michael Curtiz in those adventure films it was cinematic perfection! He was even excellent in his cowboy roles in Raoul Walsh's westerns and let's face it, nobody is gonna look at Errol and say, "Yep. There's a cowboy", but he made a darn good one.

Flynn has that ability, for me at least, of when I watch one of his adventure/western movies, even if I have never seen it, I'm instantly transported  back to being a twelve year old kid bouncing around in my seat, smiling ear to ear, giggling and pretending it's me on the screen.

Charm, grace, style, wit Errol Flynn was the best at what he did. The archetype swashbuckling rogue hero.

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Sure.  Like your workmate I was long used to THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD  in black and white, never owning a color TV set until I was 21 and eventually bought my first house with my first wife.  And too, really liked those Flynn swashbucklers since I was a kid.  But of course, for different reasons than what I still like them for.

Sepiatone

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2 hours ago, Citizen Ed said:

I'm a huge fan of Flynn's.  He was a good actor who gave good performances but when he teamed up with director Michael Curtiz in those adventure films it was cinematic perfection! He was even excellent in his cowboy roles in Raoul Walsh's westerns and let's face it, nobody is gonna look at Errol and say, "Yep. There's a cowboy", but he made a darn good one.

Flynn has that ability, for me at least, of when I watch one of his adventure/western movies, even if I have never seen it, I'm instantly transported  back to being a twelve year old kid bouncing around in my seat, smiling ear to ear, giggling and pretending it's me on the screen.

Charm, grace, style, wit Errol Flynn was the best at what he did. The archetype swashbuckling rogue hero.

Flynn had greater versatility as an actor known for action films than any other performer in history. Name any other actor who mastered swashbucklers, westerns and war dramas like Flynn did. Yes, Flynn was always underrated as a performer.

The Sea Hawk (1940) – Captured By Captain Thorpe - YouTube

Errol flynn / They Died with Their Boots On / 1941 directed by Raoul Walsh  [Warner Bros. Pictures] Stock Photo - Alamy

Objective Burma (1945): Errol Flynn During Wartime | 4 Star Films

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Warner Archive has released "The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex" on blu-ray with a transfer that is dazzling. Not only are Bette Davis and Olivia de Havilland great in their cat-and-mouse games, but the detail in their costumes shines as never before--with proper 3-strip registration.

But Flynn is a revelation, a perfect movie star, who also hits subtle and varied notes as an actor. I believe this title is underrated --as is his acting in general.

 

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7 hours ago, TomJH said:

I can still well recall a summer job I had as a youth working in a factory. The job was a simple one and it was for a full eight hours every day, shovelling dirt and minerals into a kiln. Simple as the job was it was also an exceedingly dirty one. The minerals, with the rotation of that kiln, hung literally like a dark cloud over our heads as we shovelled this mess into it. Everything would be covered with dirt and grime. Blowing one's nose produced a black product such as I would, thankfully, never see again after I quit the job. At the completion of the day's work, of course,  there was always the big shower. Even then for some time I could never quite rid of a dark ring under my eyes. It looked like I was wearing mascara.

One day when a workmate (Pete, I think his name was) and I were once shovelling this endless ghastly supply of dirt and minerals the topic of The Adventures of Robin Hood was surprisingly brought up by him. He said that he had always enjoyed the film as a kid but, because of his black and white television, had no idea that it was a colour film. He said that seeing the film for the first time in colour made it a new viewing experience for him. So there we were, shovelling this crap, but at the same time losing ourselves with memories going back to the lush Technicolor greens of Sherwood Forest as we talked of Robin (Errol Flynn) meeting Little John (Alan Hale) for the first time on that fallen log over the creek.

Little John and Robin meet on the bridge in The Adventures of Robin Hood (  1938 ) | Robin hood, Robin, Adventure

Years later at clean job far removed from shovelling stuff into a kiln I met another guy, Jim. Jim had had a hard life, but he had been a successful amateur boxer, undefeated after 50 contests, actually winning either the lightweight or welterweight (I forget which) Golden Gloves. He had a dream of turning professional but suffered a bad cut over one eye in his 50th bout (given to him when his opponent ran across the ring while they were awaiting the decision,which Jim won, and giving him a vicious head butt). Jimmy lost his next bout when that cut was re-opened and a doctor told him that he would never be able to box again as the skin over that eye was thin as tissue paper. The guy who fouled him with a head butt after the match, by the way, was a Montreal tough guy Gaetan Hart, who later became a professional boxer, eventually losing a gutsy title match to the legendary Aaron Pryor ( I'm sure Jimmy enjoyed very punch Pryor landed on him).

With his boxing dreams over Jimmy then lived for ten years or so on the streets and there he saw all the meanness there was to see there. He became known as a local tough guy, though he told me he never picked on anyone. People came to him for protection from others. Knowing Jimmy, I could well believe this. Tough guy or not he was also a sweetheart with a big heart. But the streets lead to drug addiction for him and, his biggest lifelong battle, alcoholism. When I first met Jim he hadn't touched a drop in ten years and was going to AA meetings on a weekly basis.

Jimmy and I talked about the streets and boxing a lot but one day I brought up a new topic, movies, asking him if he had any favourite actors. "Well, I always kinda liked Errol Flynn" he said, much to my surprise, and then made specific reference to the enjoyment he had received from watching Captain Blood and those tall sailing vessels in a long ago Caribbean Ocean.

model ships in the cinema: Captain Blood 1935

There's nothing new in talking about the pleasures of escapism that the movies can bring us, but these are a pair of specific illustrations of that pleasure in unpleasant (my case) or harsh circumstances (Jimmy's).

Errol Flynn's big budget adventure films made at Warner Brothers have always been a source of particular enjoyment for me, with the elegance and dynamic appeal of the best of those often stirring epics, combined, of course, with the winning combination of athleticism, devil may care charm and light heartedness that Flynn could bring to his roles, making them all seem, at least during his prime years before his self destructive lifestyle took its toll, like such a lark.

And it was good to see that my love for Flynn and, in particular, the films of his pinnacle years as a film star was shared by some others that I've known, including a guy shovelling minerals into a kiln and a tough guy seeing the meanness of the streets.

Any other Flynn fans here care to comment?

Yeah, sure Tom. I'd say the enjoyment one sees the chain gang in Sullivan's Travels receives from watching a Mickey Mouse short could easily be matched and even exceeded if then the main feature on that prison's bill had starred Errol Flynn in one of his swashbucklers. No question about it.

(...this WAS kind of the point to your story here, wasn't it?) ;)

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2 hours ago, Leighcat said:

Warner Archive has released "The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex" on blu-ray with a transfer that is dazzling. Not only are Bette Davis and Olivia de Havilland great in their cat-and-mouse games, but the detail in their costumes shines as never before--with proper 3-strip registration.

But Flynn is a revelation, a perfect movie star, who also hits subtle and various notes as an actor. I believe this title is underrated --as is his acting in general.

 

I think it was OLIVIA HAVILLAND who described a late screening of the film in which BETTE DAVIS was in attendance and she remarked to her friend OLIVIA, that she hadn't realized all those years past that ERROL was "really goot".   I believe they did not get on well during production. 

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6 hours ago, Citizen Ed said:

Charm, grace, style, wit Errol Flynn was the best at what he did. The archetype swashbuckling rogue hero.

And in the silents, it would have been DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS SR.   But sound has long been here to stay and nobody can TOUCH the archetype, ERROL FLYNN, who had it all, one of the immortals! 

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Yeah, sure Tom. I'd say the enjoyment one sees the chain gang in Sullivan's Travels receives from watching a Mickey Mouse short could easily be matched and even exceeded if then the main feature on that prison's bill had starred Errol Flynn in one of his swashbucklers. No question about it.

(...this WAS kind of the point to your story here, wasn't it?) ;)

Yes, except that with the Flynn films the enjoyment is real.

Not to nit pick but I've always wondered about that Mickey Mouse segment in that Preston Sturges film. Would adults really burst into screams of laughter the way those convicts do over the antics of Pluto? Speaking for myself, not in a million years. As a kid, maybe, as an adult, nah.

If, on the other hand, that cartoon had been one of a few Bugs Bunnys, I could well believe adults might react like that.

Speaking of Bugs, Errol made a guest appearance in one of them, of which I'm sure you are well aware, when he makes an appearance as Robin Hood at the end of Rabbit Hood . . .

VocareMentor.com | Walk With the Wise and Become Wise – Prov. 13:20 | Page 9

. . . to which Bugs, after seeing him and shaking his head says to the camera, "Nah, it couldn't be him."

Now, Dargo, I bet in its day that scene brought the house down.

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33 minutes ago, Ray Faiola said:

Flynn's cameo in IT'S A GREAT FEELING is a riot. And his performance in THANK YOUR LUCKY STARS is a revelation. But he was definitely the king of the swashbucklers (though he had a little help from Erich Korngold!!).

Ray, you, above all people, must appreciate the brilliance of the musical accompaniment that Flynn had in many of his best films, not only from Korngold but Steiner too. Robin Hood, The Sea Hawk, Dodge City and Adventures of Don Juan, among so many other films of his, wouldn't be quite the same experiences without their marvelous contributions.

As for Flynn's deft and hilarious musical contribution to Thank Your Lucky Stars, I think it's Errol at his cheeky best. I wish Warners had cast him as a scalawag vaudeville musical performer of some kind. This clip from TYLS is the closest that we ever came.

 

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As much as I love to watch Errol Flynn in his adventure films, I think my favourite Flynn performance (and one that shows off brilliantly his flare for light hearted humour) is in Gentleman Jim. I wish the quality of the video here was better but here is a clip of one of the loveliest scenes of Flynn's career as the once mighty John L. Sullivan (Ward Bond in what may be the performance of his career) comes to Jim Corbett's victory party to offer his congratulations. I've choked up a few times over the years watching this scene. Flynn and Bond are both perfect here.

 

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

 

I think that part of the charm of watching Flynn's Cockney sailor routine in Thank Your Lucky Stars, apart from the actor's musical comedy skills, is in watching him play a man inclined toward telling tall tales. Brief as this small seven minute bit was the tall tale aspect was close to Flynn's own heart, I suspect. He was a man who always enjoyed a good story, with the truth sometimes a victim in the process if it made for a better tale.

Flynn wrote three books (the third with the assistance of a ghost writer, Earl Conrad). Both Flynn's first book, Beam Ends, as well as his more famous autobiography, My Wicked Wicked Ways, are based on true incidents in the actor's life with a lot of embellishments along the way. Fact and fiction get blended together to the extent that we will never quite know the truth (certainly in the first half of Wicked Ways), which I have little doubt is exactly the way Errol Flynn would have wished it.

I recently acquired a hard cover 1937 copy of Beam Ends, Flynn's breezy, enjoyable first book about his pre-Hollywood adventures as a young man on a schooner voyage along the Australian coast to New Guinea. This was a true event but, again, Errol stretched the truth but he still told a good tale. The copy I got was signed by Flynn on the title page (at least I hope it was; it certainly looks like his signature). It cost me a pretty penny, of course, but, as a long time Flynn fan, I shall put this book in a special place of honour in my home.

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Not a secret here.  I love Errol Flynn.

He's actually a more recent discovery for me as I hadn't seen any of his films until just a few years ago (maybe 2014? 2015?).  I'd heard his name, but had never seen any of his films.  I didn't even know what he looked like.  Suffice it to say, he quickly replaced Gene Kelly as my favorite actor.  Gene is now numero dos.

Then, I saw him for the first time on the big screen during a showing of The Adventures of Robin Hood.  

Yowza.

The DVD Journal | Reviews : The Adventures of Robin Hood: Special Edition

Flynn has one of the all-time greatest entrances, when he walks into Prince John's banquet with one of Prince John's prized deer wrapped around his shoulders.

After seeing the gorgeous Flynn with the beautiful Olivia de Havilland in the stunning Technicolor masterpiece that is The Adventures of Robin Hood, I was hooked on Flynn.

I rented every Flynn film I could get my hands on: The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex, Captain Blood, Adventures of Don Juan, The Sea Hawk... 

I borrowed his autobiography, My Wicked Wicked Ways, from the library.  It was hilarious, tragic, captivating, everything.  It is one of the few books that I actually only read one page a night when I got down to the last chapter because I didn't want it to end!   I also found his second book, Showdown, at a used bookstore for $7! I am still looking for Beam Ends and I am jealous that Tom has a copy. 

I now own copies of most of Flynn's films--even some of his 1950s films which I'm less excited about.  There's a certain weariness, a sadness to them that I find tragic--especially coming from such a charismatic and lively personality like Flynn.  However, he did turn out some good work during the last decade of his life.  I did enjoy Against All Flags, Mara Maru, The Master of Ballantrae, and The Sun Also Rises.  Flynn's performances during this time take on a bit of cynicism, perhaps taking on a bit of Flynn's true perspective during this time.  Had he lived into the 1960s and into his 50s and 60s, I think Flynn would have evolved into a great character actor.  Just think of the types of roles he could have taken on had he taken care of his body a little better.  I could completely see Flynn in the Cary Grant type roles of the 1950s and 1960s, the sophisticated older man type.

My personal favorites of Flynn's however are:

My absolute favorite is Gentleman Jim.  I think this was one of Flynn's favorite roles as well and I think his enthusiasm for it shows.  He is funny, compelling, romantic, sweet (in the scenes with his mother), athletic... he is everything in this film.  Combine his performance with the feisty Alexis Smith (one of his best leading ladies, imo) and the hysterical Alan Hale ("Give 'em room!") the cantankerous William Frawley, and the hilarious best friend Jack Carson and you have everything you could ever want in a film.

I also love:

Never Say Goodbye.  One of Flynn's few forays into comedy.  This is one of my annual Christmas films.  He's fantastic with Eleanor Parker.  They make a gorgeous couple.  I even loved his scenes with child actor Patti Brady.  He is very funny with SZ Sakall.  I love this movie and have seen it at least a dozen times.

Uncertain Glory. A Flynn film that is not mentioned often, but it is my favorite of his war films.  In this film, Flynn actually doesn't play a hero, but he gets a chance to be a hero.  My only complaint about this film is his leading lady.  She's boring.  I wish that the filmmakers had increased Faye Emerson's role and given her the part of Flynn's girlfriend/traveling companion, because she was much more interesting than the lady that was cast.

Footsteps in the Dark.  Another one of Flynn's comedic roles.  In this film, he gets to play a banker who is secretly writing scandalous novels using his high society family and acquaintances as fodder for his book.  This is also one of the classic "mystery writer gets pulled into real life mystery" stories.  Flynn is adept at comedy and as a detective.  This film was potentially going to be the start of a Thin Man-esque series of films, but it didn't do well enough at the box office to warrant a second story.  It's a shame too, because Flynn's comedy films are very funny.

Montana.  This is one of those "the sheep people versus the cow people" westerns, but I enjoy this one.  It's one of the few films where Flynn actually plays an Australian and he appears opposite Alexis Smith again.  He even sings a song which I enjoy.

Silver River.  In this film, Flynn plays a more serious role, perhaps even a villainous role.  He's fantastic though, as was leading lady Ann Sheridan.  I wish that Flynn and Sheridan had made more films together because I love them together in this movie.

Thank Your Lucky Stars.  Flynn's musical performance in this film is awesome and shows his versatility.  It is definitely one of the better and more memorable parts of this film. 

Cry Wolf.  Flynn's only foray into film noir and he appears opposite the amazing Barbara Stanwyck.  While this isn't the greatest film noir that I've ever seen, I love seeing Flynn acting against type and thought he made for an interesting villain-esque character.  I've mentioned this before, but I've often wondered how Flynn would have fared had he switched roles with Bogart in The Two Mrs. Carrolls, also starring Stanwyck and released the same year.  Both Bogart and Flynn seem slightly out of place in their respective films, and think they seemed better suited for the other film.  The one thought I always have about Cry Wolf is that Flynn seems too young to be Stanwyck's husband's uncle.  

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13 hours ago, TomJH said:

I can still well recall a summer job I had as a youth working in a factory. The job was a simple one and it was for a full eight hours every day, shovelling dirt and minerals into a kiln. Simple as the job was it was also an exceedingly dirty one. The minerals, with the rotation of that kiln, hung literally like a dark cloud over our heads as we shovelled this mess into it. Everything would be covered with dirt and grime. Blowing one's nose produced a black product such as I would, thankfully, never see again after I quit the job. At the completion of the day's work, of course,  there was always the big shower. Even then for some time I could never quite get rid of a dark ring under my eyes. It looked like I was wearing mascara.

One day when a workmate (Pete, I think his name was) and I were once shovelling this endless ghastly supply of dirt and minerals the topic of The Adventures of Robin Hood was surprisingly brought up by him. He said that he had always enjoyed the film as a kid but, because of his black and white television, had no idea that it was a colour film. He said that seeing the film for the first time in colour made it a new viewing experience for him. So there we were, shovelling this crap, but at the same time losing ourselves with memories going back to the lush Technicolor greens of Sherwood Forest as we talked of Robin (Errol Flynn) meeting Little John (Alan Hale) for the first time on that fallen log over the creek.

Little John and Robin meet on the bridge in The Adventures of Robin Hood (  1938 ) | Robin hood, Robin, Adventure

Years later at clean job far removed from shovelling stuff into a kiln I met another guy, Jim. Jim had had a hard life, but he had been a successful amateur boxer, undefeated after 50 contests, actually winning either the lightweight or welterweight (I forget which) Golden Gloves. He had a dream of turning professional but suffered a bad cut over one eye in his 50th bout (given to him when his opponent ran across the ring while they were awaiting the decision,which Jim won, and giving him a vicious head butt). Jimmy lost his next bout when that cut was re-opened and a doctor told him that he would never be able to box again as the skin over that eye was thin as tissue paper. The guy who fouled him with a head butt after the match, by the way, was a Montreal tough guy Gaetan Hart, who later became a professional boxer, eventually losing a gutsy title match to the legendary Aaron Pryor ( I'm sure Jimmy enjoyed very punch Pryor landed on him).

With his boxing dreams over Jimmy then lived for ten years or so on the streets and there he saw all the meanness there was to see there. He became known as a local tough guy, though he told me he never picked on anyone. People came to him for protection from others. Knowing Jimmy, I could well believe this. Tough guy or not he was also a sweetheart with a big heart. But the streets lead to drug addiction for him and, his biggest lifelong battle, alcoholism. When I first met Jim he hadn't touched a drop in ten years and was going to AA meetings on a weekly basis.

Jimmy and I talked about the streets and boxing a lot but one day I brought up a new topic, movies, asking him if he had any favourite actors. "Well, I always kinda liked Errol Flynn" he said, much to my surprise, and then made specific reference to the enjoyment he had received from watching Captain Blood and those tall sailing vessels in a long ago Caribbean Ocean.

model ships in the cinema: Captain Blood 1935

There's nothing new in talking about the pleasures of escapism that the movies can bring us, but these are a pair of specific illustrations of that pleasure in unpleasant (my case) or harsh circumstances (Jimmy's).

Errol Flynn's big budget adventure films made at Warner Brothers have always been a source of particular enjoyment for me, with the elegance and dynamic appeal of the best of those often stirring epics, combined, of course, with the winning combination of athleticism, devil may care charm and light heartedness that Flynn could bring to his roles, making them all seem, at least during his prime years before his self destructive lifestyle took its toll, like such a lark.

And it was good to see that my love for Flynn and, in particular, the films of his pinnacle years as a film star was shared by some others that I've known, including a guy shovelling minerals into a kiln and a tough guy seeing the meanness of the streets.

Any other Flynn fans here care to comment?

While This Particular post has, not that much to do with Flynn per se

 

     Far as Escapism and Cinema go, im a HUGE Fan of Films that give the viewer the "Scotty Treatment". Where You actually break a sweat while taking in a desert sequence/scene. You (proverbially) get splashed from that puddle that Gene Kelly just now gleefully stepped in.. or You get nauseous just watching Flynn seamlessly scale a beam en route to the birds nest while enduring a category 3 (or 2  ,lol) hurricane

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35 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Uncertain Glory. A Flynn film that is not mentioned often, but it is my favorite of his war films.  In this film, Flynn actually doesn't play a hero, but he gets a chance to be a hero.  My only complaint about this film is his leading lady.  She's boring.  I wish that the filmmakers had increased Faye Emerson's role and given her the part of Flynn's girlfriend/traveling companion, because she was much more interesting than the lady that was cast.

Montana.  This is one of those "the sheep people versus the cow people" westerns, but I enjoy this one.  It's one of the few films where Flynn actually plays an Australian and he appears opposite Alexis Smith again.  He even sings a song which I enjoy.

.  

I've been looking for you to join in, Speedy. I think your critique of Uncertain Glory is spot on. I might add that Flynn's conversion at the end of the film is very abrupt but the problem lies with either the script or editing, not Errol's performance, where his cynicism is on effective display in his most amoral characterization.

Montana is one of two films in which many write Flynn played an Aussie (including the otherwise great Films of Errol Flynn). But it's not true. The next time you see the film listen to the dialogue in Flynn's first scene and it's explained that Flynn's father took him to Australia after he was run out of Montana by cattlemen, and now he was returning to that state to stay (clear implication being that he is American). I realize this is pretty nit picky but I'm just pointing it out for accuracy's sake. Desperate Journey is the only film Errol made in which he played an Australian.

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5 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I've been looking for you t o join in, Speedy. I think your critique of Uncertain Glory is spot on. I might add that Flynn's conversion at the end of the film is very abrupt but the problem lies with either the script or editing, not Errol's performance, where his cynicism is on effective display in his most amoral characterization.

Montana is one of two films in which many write Flynn played an Aussie (including the otherwise great Films of Errol Flynn). But it's not true. The next time you see the film listen to the dialogue in Flynn's first scene and it's explained that Flynn's father took him to Australia after he was run out of Montana by cattlemen, and now he was returning to that state to stay (clear implication being that he is American). I realize this is pretty nit picky but I'm just pointing it out for accuracy's sake. Desperate Journey is the only film Errol made in which he played an Australian.

I agree about Uncertain Glory.  For most of the film, Flynn is just trying to get away from Paul Lukas and frankly, he has a couple chances to do so, when Lukas falls ill, but ultimately he doesn't.  I agree that his conversion seems abrupt.  I am not sure if it would have been better had we seen something that changed Flynn's mind, or whether that would have seem contrived. At the end of the film, it is made to seem that Flynn's patriotism (nationalism?) for his country was the deciding factor. 

I haven't seen Montana for awhile and had forgotten the dialogue about Flynn's father.  Thank you.  I also like San Antonio again with Alexis Smith.  That film is interesting and I like Smith's character in it.  The only one of Flynn's Westerns that I haven't seen is Rocky Mountain, though I own it in my Errol Flynn Westerns box set.

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On 7/15/2021 at 11:11 PM, speedracer5 said:

I agree about Uncertain Glory.  For most of the film, Flynn is just trying to get away from Paul Lukas and frankly, he has a couple chances to do so, when Lukas falls ill, but ultimately he doesn't.  I agree that his conversion seems abrupt.  I am not sure if it would have been better had we seen something that changed Flynn's mind, or whether that would have seem contrived. At the end of the film, it is made to seem that Flynn's patriotism (nationalism?) for his country was the deciding factor. 

I haven't seen Montana for awhile and had forgotten the dialogue about Flynn's father.  Thank you.  I also like San Antonio again with Alexis Smith.  That film is interesting and I like Smith's character in it.  The only one of Flynn's Westerns that I haven't seen is Rocky Mountain, though I own it in my Errol Flynn Westerns box set.

For crying out loud, Speedy, take a look at Rocky Mountain. It was clearly made on a smaller budget than many of Errol's earlier westerns and he is no longer the glamourous cowboy that he was in his earlier efforts either. But Flynn's now rugged features brings a greater credibility to his characterization, which is effectively understated, as well as his credentials as a screen cowboy. Flynn doesn't fall back on his patented charm for audience approval in this one. He sure doesn't overact (not that he did in any of his films). I think he gives a lovely performance here. And the film has a memorable climax, too. Nuff said.

Download Rocky Mountain (Western 1950) Errol Flynn 720p [WWRG] Torrent -  EXT Torrents

In contrast to this is his glamourous cowboy in the big budget San Antonio, which I find (particularly the first half) to be a really fun (if conventional) affair. Flynn is really at the peak of his charm when he first meets Alexis Smith after sliding boots first into her stagecoach. He was an actor with so much personality (certainly when he was a young man) and it's shown off to a marvelous degree in his earlier scenes in the film, largely played for light hearted humour. In addition, he and Alexis Smith always had very nice chemistry.

Alexis Smith and Errol Flynn / San Antonio / 1945 directed by David Butler  [WARNER BROS.] Stock Photo - Alamy

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4 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

... and don't forget CAPTAIN BLOOD... 

Captain_Blood.jpeg

He appeared in so many good films, with Captain Blood one of my favourites. I was raised watching this one on TV. The most important film of Flynn's career since its success lead to all the others.

Among the others . . ,

THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE (1936): Separating Fact from Fiction - ONE  WAY STREET

Charge of the Light Brigade, with Flynn doing his own riding at the end

The Dawn Patrol (1938) - Turner Classic Movies

The Dawn Patrol, with one of Errol's best performances, and great co-starring work by Basil Rathbone and David Niven

Westerns '39: Dodge City – Ryan Harvey

Dodge City, his first western, with a slam bang saloon brawl and Alan Hale stealing every scene he's in

The Sea Hawk - 1940 - English - IEVENN

The Sea Hawk, one of the great swashbucklers with Flynn at a real peak

They Died With Their Boots On (1941) - Rotten Tomatoes

They Died With Their Boots On, with Flynn's romantic Custer one of his best portrayals even if it has little to do with history

Fridays With Errol Flynn: Gentleman Jim (1942) – Ticklish Business

Gentleman Jim, rollicking great fun, a high energy largely fictional account of Jim Corbett and probably Errol's favourite role

Objective, Burma! (1945) - IMDb

Objective Burma, Flynn's most famous, if controversial, war drama, with realistic jungle atmosphere

Download The Adventures Of Don Juan 1948.3gp .mp4 | Codedwap

Adventures of Don Juan, the last of his big swashbucklers, with Errol showing off a real flare for tongue-in-cheek humour. I wish he had had more opportunities for it.

 

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I've only seen a handful of Flynn mpvies, given my own peculiar proclivities of movie watching. Swashbucklers, war movies and (most) Westerns rarely generate much interest in me, the three genres in which Flynn seemed to excel. But I have enjoyed what I have seen him in, and I certainly appreciate the magnitude of his stardom.

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