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Oliver Stone Revisits His Great Film at Cannes


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LewRockwell.com
anti-state•anti-war•pro-market

Oliver Stone Revisits His Great Film at Cannes
July 15, 2021

Oliver Stone revisited his film JFK at Cannes Film Festival. “Since Kennedy was killed, no American president has crossed certain lines. These lines are into the military and intelligence sectors.”

 

 

 

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Stone was my favorite director as a high schooler, but now there's only a few of his films i can tolerate.  his abuse of history and re-writing it in his films borders on negligence.  I liked JFK but after learning about the true story of Garrison, it just wasn't something than needed a film dedicated to it.

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The JFK assassination itself has been dissected to pieces by obsessed
researchers like me. Suffice to say that a few days of intense study of the
available record will convince any honest person, beyond any reasonable
doubt, that Lee Harvey Oswald was not responsible for the crime. The coverup
was so clear and obvious in nature, and so shabbily constructed, that the
conclusion is inescapable that the conspirators who killed him wanted the
kind of controversy that soon exploded, shortly after the first wave of private
citizens began to look at the data.

— Donald Jeffries

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Sorry, Stone's film sucks. Bad writing, bad acting & it looks like an 80's MTV video. And if anyone thinks it's historic or revelatory, they're sadly mistaken.

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6 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Sorry, Stone's film sucks. Bad writing, bad acting & it looks like an 80's MTV video. And if anyone thinks it's historic or revelatory, they're sadly mistaken.

I don't think it's a bad film- actually it's a rather decent fictional story.

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2 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

I don't think it's a bad film- actually it's a rather decent fictional story.

Basically, take it in the same spirit of those old songwriter's biographies they used to turn out in the 1940s

 

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24 minutes ago, rjbartrop said:

Basically, take it in the same spirit of those old songwriter's biographies they used to turn out in the 1940s

 

Yes, The Buster Keaton Story comes to mind. Stone straight-up changed facts in his film.

For what it's worth, IMO it was clearly Oswald and Oswald alone.

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4 minutes ago, Shank Asu said:

Yes, The Buster Keaton Story comes to mind. Stone straight-up changed facts in his film.

For what it's worth, IMO it was clearly Oswald and Oswald alone.

And then there's "Hans Christian Andersen",  where even at the start of the film they straight up went, "We made it up, okay?"

I'm inclined to agree about Oswald, and there was a recent study that supported that.  From what I can tell, people have been gunning for the president for almost as long as the Republic has been around, and it still continues.  Unfortunately, a few are bound to get through.

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On 7/15/2021 at 2:12 PM, Shank Asu said:

Stone was my favorite director as a high schooler, but now there's only a few of his films i can tolerate.  his abuse of history and re-writing it in his films borders on negligence.  I liked JFK but after learning about the true story of Garrison, it just wasn't something than needed a film dedicated to it.

Outstanding 👍      I consider Stone's JFK  to be a great film despite his ridiculous view of the Kennedy Assassination. The film is just plain entertaining fiction and when it comes to his view of the assassination and events surrounding it, the man seems like he belongs in a mental institution.

And, yes, Garrison was himself a loon who fabricated a conspiracy out of nothing. There was only one man responsible for the murder of John Kennedy, and his name was Lee Harvey Oswald. There was no conspiracy.

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LewRockwell.com

anti-stateanti-warpro-market

What the CIA Is Hiding in the JFK Assassination
By Jacob G. Hornberger

The Future of Freedom Foundation

October 29, 2021

 

 

With President Biden succumbing to the CIA’s demand to continue keeping the CIA’s records relating to the Kennedy assassination secret, the question naturally arises: What is the CIA still hiding? (See my blog post of yesterday entitled “Surprise! Biden Continues the CIA’s JFK Assassination Cover-Up.”)

To understand what they are still hiding and why they are still hiding it, it’s necessary to go back to the 1990s during the era of the Assassination Records Review Board — and even further back than that to November 22, 1963 — the day that Kennedy was assassinated. 

People often say that if the CIA and the Pentagon had orchestrated the assassination of President Kennedy, someone would have talked by now. 

That’s just not true. When it comes to murder, people don’t talk. They know that if they do talk, they run the risk of themselves being murdered, maybe their families too. People who participate in murder schemes know that they had better keep their mouths shut or else.

One example is Mafia figure Jimmy Hoffa. We still don’t know who killed Hoffa. That’s because no one talked. Another example is Johnny Roselli, the liaison in the CIA-Mafia partnership to assassinate Cuban leader Fidel Castro. We still don’t know who murdered Roselli. No one has ever talked.

People who talk also run the risk of being prosecuted because there is no statute of limitations for murder. A good recent example is real-estate heir Robert Durst. He was recently convicted of murdering a person twenty-one years ago.

So, it was always a safe bet that the CIA and the Pentagon would be able to keep their regime-change operation in Dallas sealed in secrecy.

However, not so with respect to the fraudulent autopsy that the Pentagon carried out on President Kennedy’s body on the evening of the assassination. When the ARRB released people who had participated in the autopsy during the 1990s, they talked.

As I detailed in my books The Kennedy Autopsy and The Kennedy Autopsy 2 and in my online presentation in our Zoom conference last spring, a fraudulent autopsy was an essential part of the cover-up in the assassination.

The problem that the plotters had, however, is that in order to carry out this part of the cover-up, they had to enlist the assistance of many people within the vast national-security establishment who played no role in the assassination. Since all those people were innocent and mostly unwitting participants to the cover-up, they didn’t have the same incentive to stay quiet as the people who knowingly participated in the assassination itself.

The military did its best to keep everyone quiet by telling the autopsy participants that what they were doing was classified. Everyone in the military knows what that means — people are expected to take classified secrets to the grave with them. Participants to the autopsy were required to sign written secrecy oaths. They were also threatened with court martial or criminal prosecution if they ever revealed what they had done or seen.

As I pointed out in The Kennedy Autopsy, the scheme for a fraudulent autopsy was actually set into motion at Parkland Hospital in Dallas. Immediately after Kennedy was declared dead, the Dallas County Medical Examiner, Dr. Earl Rose, announced his intent to conduct an autopsy on the president’s body, as Texas law required. That was when a team of armed Secret Service agents, brandishing guns, told Rose in no uncertain terms that they would not permit him to do the autopsy. Forcing their way out of Parkland Hospital, they took the body to Dallas’s Love Field, where new President Lyndon Johnson was waiting for it. Johnson then took the body back with him to Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland, where he delivered it into the hands of the military.

Although the mainstream media always treated all this as normal, given the dominant role that the national-security establishment was playing in Cold War America, it was actually quite bizarre and aberrant. The military never had any jurisdiction or legal authority to conduct the autopsy. At that time, killing a president was not a federal crime. The United States was not at war with any nation state. Kennedy was not killed on the field of battle. His killing was a straight murder case under Texas state law. Any criminal prosecution for the assassination would take place in Dallas. A genuinely honest autopsy would be a critically important part of that criminal prosecution, especially since a sharp team of criminal-defense lawyers would inevitably be defending the accused.

The military was mostly, but not entirely, able to keep its fraudulent autopsy secret for some 30 years, until the ARRB began releasing people who had participated in the autopsy from their vows of secrecy. As the ARRB began forcing the military to release its records relating to the autopsy, the dam of secrecy surrounding the autopsy broke wide open. That’s when the fraud became apparent. That’s why the JFK Records Act was such a nightmare for the Pentagon and the CIA. If it hadn’t been for that law, there is no doubt that the military’s fraudulent autopsy would still be shrouded in secrecy today. 

What the Pentagon and the CIA learned from the era of the ARRB is that the community of assassination researchers is composed of some very smart people. By analyzing the evidence that the ARRB was succeeding in getting released, assassination researchers were able to put together the pieces of the puzzle that established a fraudulent autopsy, along with lots of other pieces of circumstantial evidence establishing that what occurred on November 22, 1963, was a highly sophisticated national-security state regime-change operation.

The leading figure in this endeavor was Douglas Horne, who served on the ARRB staff. Anyone who reads Horne’s five-volume book Inside the Assassination Records Review Board will inevitably conclude that the autopsy that the military conducted on the Kennedy’s body a few hours after the assassination was fraudulent to the core. 

At the risk of belaboring the obvious, there is no innocent explanation for a fraudulent autopsy being conducted on President Kennedy’s body, especially given that the scheme for a fraudulent autopsy was launched at the moment Kennedy was declared dead.

It stands to reason that if a government agency is being forced to reveal records relating to a regime-change operation, that agency is going to keep the most incriminating evidence secret for as long as possible. We still don’t know what the CIA is still hiding, but we can safely assume that there is a good reason why the CIA does not want to let those super-smart assassination researchers get a hold of it. 

That’s why the national-security establishment will fight tooth and nail for permanent secrecy on their remaining JFK assassination-related records. Oh, the Pentagon and the CIA will most likely authorize Biden and the National Archives to release some innocuous records for appearance’s sake. But make no mistake about it: They will make certain that Biden, the National Archives, and all future presidents comply with their demand for permanent secrecy on what they need to hide on a permanent basis.

The original source of this article is The Future of Freedom Foundation.

The Best of Jacob G. Hornberger

Jacob Hornberger [send him mail] is founder and president of The Future of Freedom Foundation.

Copyright © The Future of Freedom Foundation

Previous article by Jacob G. Hornberger: The Conflicts of Visions That Shaped America

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