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Olympic Documentaries


kingrat
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TCM will be showing a day of Olympic documentaries on Monday, July 19. I definitely want to record Tokyo Olympiad, directed by the great Japanese director Kon Ichikawa. This received glowing reviews when it was first released, was later available on VCR, but then didn't make the transition to DVD, for whatever reason.

The whole series of documentaries should be most interesting for glimpses of the times.

 

 

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1 hour ago, kingrat said:

Re: "TCM will be showing a day of Olympic documentaries on Monday, July 19. I definitely want to record Tokyo Olympiad, directed by the great Japanese director Kon Ichikawa. This received glowing reviews when it was first released, was later available on VCR, but then didn't make the transition to DVD, for whatever reason.

The whole series of documentaries should be most interesting for glimpses of the times."

 Kon Ichikawa also is scheduled for screening in VISIONS OF EIGHT (1973) which follows TOKYO OLYMPIAD. He directed "THE FASTEST" segment...

 The controversy leading up to the men's 100 meters sprint at Munich, the subject of Ichikawa's "THE FASTEST", is but a hint to my knowledge: You should notice only one American in the event that is often dominated by the United States.

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10 hours ago, kingrat said:

TCM will be showing a day of Olympic documentaries on Monday, July 19. I definitely want to record Tokyo Olympiad, directed by the great Japanese director Kon Ichikawa. This received glowing reviews when it was first released, was later available on VCR, but then didn't make the transition to DVD, for whatever reason.

The whole series of documentaries should be most interesting for glimpses of the times.

 

 

Thought i would take a minute to pitch a half dozen or so recommendable sports (themed) films for those who might be Interested

   Doesnt Have Much of Anything to do with documentaries im sorry to say. Though it does, with Sports/Olympics themed topics:

.Pride of the Yankees

.Take Me Out to the Ballgame 

.Rush

.Slalom

.Here Comes Mr Jordan (the Rains Montgomerry Version)

.Warrior

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Honorable Mention:

  Southpaw

 I, Tonya

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On 7/15/2021 at 2:15 PM, kingrat said:

TCM will be showing a day of Olympic documentaries on Monday, July 19. I definitely want to record Tokyo Olympiad, directed by the great Japanese director Kon Ichikawa. This received glowing reviews when it was first released, was later available on VCR, but then didn't make the transition to DVD, for whatever reason.

The whole series of documentaries should be most interesting for glimpses of the times.

Thanks for the heads-up, I knew it would be on but didn't know about the Kon Ichikawa connection. My cable box/TIVO was misbehaving, so the company replaced it yesterday. As a result, I lost all a lot of stuff. So now I need to repopulate it. The White Stadium sounds intriguing as well, as does the Stockholm. I'm hoping  the London film features the opening ceremony, but I'm not sure it will.

And, as a consolation for my loss, there are a couple of Rohmer films as well!

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Is there any reasoning about not showing “Olympia” 1938 by Leni Riefenstahl? I know of all the political reasons why it, and she, might not be high on lists, but it is possibly one of the most famous films about the Olympics. TCM usually doesn’t shy away from thought provoking art, whether good or bad. 

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2 hours ago, Kbernhard said:

Is there any reasoning about not showing “Olympia” 1938 by Leni Riefenstahl? I know of all the political reasons why it, and she, might not be high on lists, but it is possibly one of the most famous films about the Olympics. TCM usually doesn’t shy away from thought provoking art, whether good or bad. 

I wondered about that, too.

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On 7/17/2021 at 7:18 PM, Kbernhard said:

Is there any reasoning about not showing “Olympia” 1938 by Leni Riefenstahl? I know of all the political reasons why it, and she, might not be high on lists, but it is possibly one of the most famous films about the Olympics. TCM usually doesn’t shy away from thought provoking art, whether good or bad. 

It's Nazi propaganda.  Save it for film school or historians.  TCM has probably decided that the limit is good ol' racist American films like Birth of a Nation, with pre-screen disclaimers, shown infrequently.  Given what has gone on in the US over the past few years, TCM is not going to be in the mood to show downright Nazi propaganda films, even with a disclaimer.  TCM now puts disclaimers and discussions ahead of films like Gone with the Wind.

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On 7/16/2021 at 8:30 PM, Swithin said:

Re: "...I'm hoping  the London film features the opening ceremony, but I'm not sure it will."

 If haven't yet viewed, yes, some of the proverbial pomp and circumstance of the 1948 games' opening ceremony is on display for you...

 It was interesting viewing the hammer heaving: I think some of its footage showed up later in wee Geordie (1955) for the fictional Olympic competition.

 Imre Nemeth, the '48 victor, is shown, and his son might be seen later this evening in Games of the XXI Olympiad (1977): Miklos Nemeth way outdistanced the Montreal field in the men's javelin throw!

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Today's TCM programming on the Olympics seems to be drawn entirely from the recent Criterion box set, 100 Years of Olympic Films, which contains 53 films covering the Olympics from 1912 to 2012.  The bits of today's films that I've seen have been fascinating, and the restorations have been very impressive.  For example, early this morning, I saw a portion of the silent film about the 1912 Stockholm Olympics, and the picture quality was absolutely pristine.

Riefenstahl's Olympia (1938) is part of the Criterion set, so it was presumably available to TCM.  But as an inherently controversial film that's arguably Nazi propaganda (yes, I've seen it, so I'm not just speculating), I can see why TCM might not have wanted to disrupt its otherwise positive presentation of Olympic history.  After all, there wasn't time, even in today's 24-hour schedule of Olympic films, to show anywhere near all of the movies in this box set.  With limited time, some movies had to be left aside.  And why draw attention to the Olympics that was hosted by one of the most evil regimes in human history?

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3 hours ago, NoShear said:

 If haven't yet viewed, yes, some of the proverbial pomp and circumstance of the 1948 games' opening ceremony is on display for you...

 It was interesting viewing the hammer heaving: I think some of its footage showed up later in wee Geordie (1955) for the fictional Olympic competition.

 Imre Nemeth, the '48 victor, is shown, and his son might be seen later this evening in Games of the XXI Olympiad (1977): Miklos Nemeth way outdistanced the Montreal field in the men's javelin throw!

Although I'm looking forward to that, I was hoping for the 2012 ceremony. I was in London at that time and watched it with two friends, one since died.

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1 hour ago, Swithin said:

Re: "Although I'm looking forward to that, I was hoping for the 2012 ceremony. I was in London at that time and watched it with two friends, one since died."

 The LONDON OLYMPICS opening cermony was awesome, and it's awesome you got to be there, Swithin...

 Daniel Craig on his Majesty's secret service:     

 

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21 minutes ago, NoShear said:

 The LONDON OLYMPICS opening cermony was awesome, and it's awesome you got to be there, Swithin...

 Daniel Craig on his Majesty's secret service:     

 

Thanks! I wasn't at the stadium in East London; I was on the other side of town, in West London, watching it on TV with my friends. 

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58 minutes ago, Swithin said:

Thanks! I wasn't at the stadium in East London; I was on the other side of town, in West London, watching it on TV with my friends. 

And now I'm reminded that it was actually the 2004 Athens Olympics we watched in London. I was home in NYC watching the 2012 London Olympics. But in any case, these films are awesome!

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I still can't understand why either TCM or my cable service would list an Olympic documentary as featuring Nadia Comaneci  and CAITLYN JENNER,  When surely Caitlyn Jenner never attended.   However, BRUCE was phenomenal!  

Sepiatone

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On 7/18/2021 at 9:26 PM, karlofffan said:

It's Nazi propaganda.  Save it for film school or historians.  TCM has probably decided that the limit is good ol' racist American films like Birth of a Nation, with pre-screen disclaimers, shown infrequently.  Given what has gone on in the US over the past few years, TCM is not going to be in the mood to show downright Nazi propaganda films, even with a disclaimer.  TCM now puts disclaimers and discussions ahead of films like Gone with the Wind.

It's a piece of film history, often placed in the 100 films of all time and almost always as the top olympic film.  Know the context and watch the film IMO.

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Watched a couple hours last night of the docs on the 76 and 84 games.  I ran track in college so the  classic track and field events is always catches my attention.  Enjoyed watching Lasse Viren win gold again in 76 (even though as an Oregon boy he was the foil to Prefontaine in 72, and he (Pre) wouldn't live to race in another olympics) and had never seen footage of Bruce Jenner competing before.

Been fortunate enough to see a few olympic venues while traveling.  Something haunting about visiting the site of the Munich Olympics (72) which were stained by terrorists kidnapping and killing Israeli athletes, that stays with you long forever. 

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13 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

It's a piece of film history, often placed in the 100 films of all time and almost always as the top olympic film.  Know the context and watch the film IMO.

That's not the way it's perceived in the US and Canada, TCM's core audience.  Show that film and in one month half the cable companies in North America will have dropped TCM.  For good reason, IYAM.  That's also its context.

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On 7/17/2021 at 10:18 PM, Kbernhard said:

Is there any reasoning about not showing “Olympia” 1938 by Leni Riefenstahl? I know of all the political reasons why it, and she, might not be high on lists, but it is possibly one of the most famous films about the Olympics. TCM usually doesn’t shy away from thought provoking art, whether good or bad. 

Ironically this is probably the only thing related to any Olympic ceremony ever that I would actually be very interested in watching.

**NOTE: PURELY FOR THE HISTORY DEPICTED, NOT BECAUSE IM A BIG FAN OF NAZIS. 
 

FURTHER EDIT: because I’m not. (Sorry, after the last few years I feel the need to make that completely clear just because... )

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5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Ironically this is probably the only thing related to any Olympic ceremony ever that I would actually be very interested in watching.

**NOTE: PURELY FOR THE HISTORY DEPICTED, NOT BECAUSE IM A BIG FAN OF NAZIS. 
 

FURTHER EDIT: because I’m not. (Sorry, after the last few years I feel the need to make that completely clear just because... )

Same. Had it been shown I would have watched Olympia. The bits I've seen of the one's they are showing that I've glanced at don't hold my attention for any length of time. They remind me of the Ed & Steve Sabol NFL Films shorts but in long form and without the legendary Voice of God John Facenda narrating, in other words boring as all get out.

Riefenstahl's Olympia along with her non -sport Triumph of the Wills with all their pageantry and choreographed order offers a fascinating view into how the public were seduced into supporting the Reich.

Yes the creators and Nazis were reprehensibly beyond any imaginable evil. But they had the willing support of the populace. These films and others like them give us a major insight into how that support was earned and that is invaluable into preventing it from happening again.

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13 minutes ago, Citizen Ed said:

 

Yes the creators and Nazis were reprehensibly beyond any imaginable evil. But they had the willing support of the populace. These films and others like them give us a major insight into how that support was earned and that is invaluable into preventing it from happening again.

At first maybe.  But quickly, and to that populace's dismay it became, "You WILL support us!  Or ELSE!!"  ;) 

Sepiatone

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