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Every source I've found says this caricature (the gent in profile you see sitting at the table) is of Don Ameche, but I say it's supposed to be George Brent. What say you?


Dargo
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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Like I said earlier to Sans here Hibi, when caricaturists go about their art, they will always exaggerate certain aspects of their subject's appearance, and I think this what happened with this drawning of George Brent and his nose, as every other feature depicted of him here such as, and as Lorna mentioned the eyebrows, say George Brent.

(...yep, I'm holding fast to my "Brent Theory" here, folks)

Yeh, they exaggerated George Brent so much that he wound up looking like Xavier Cugat!

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

is it maybe CESAR ROMERO?

I'm sorry, I'm having a hard time getting past THAT MAUVE EYE SHADOW on CARTOON CLAUDETTE and CARTOON NORMA (as if either WOULD EVER!)

I see it and I am reminded instantly of this:

 

Homer, you’ve got it set on w h o r e!

Cesar Romero is seen dancing with Rita Hayworth in the short. 

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According to https://texaveryatwb.blogspot.com/2019/09/hollywood-steps-out-and-les-films.html

"Hollywood Steps Out is mostly the film audiences of May 1941 saw. "

However. 

"Hollywood Steps Out is an example of how certain cartoons were altered for their reissue--in this case, seven years after its director had moved on to M-G-M. In this window of time, a war was fought, times changed and some celebrities lost their mass appeal; others matured and no longer resembled their caricatured selves. As wartime gags were scissored from post-war reissues, cultural references that no longer made sense got 86d. None of this mattered to the average moviegoer. The cartoon was not the reason they came to the theater. "

There's a link to the "Blue Ribbon reissue of 10/2/48" of Hollywood Steps Out. Looks to be the same cartoon with a different title card.

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On 7/16/2021 at 1:01 PM, Moe Howard said:

According to https://texaveryatwb.blogspot.com/2019/09/hollywood-steps-out-and-les-films.html

"Hollywood Steps Out is mostly the film audiences of May 1941 saw. "

However. 

"Hollywood Steps Out is an example of how certain cartoons were altered for their reissue--in this case, seven years after its director had moved on to M-G-M. In this window of time, a war was fought, times changed and some celebrities lost their mass appeal; others matured and no longer resembled their caricatured selves. As wartime gags were scissored from post-war reissues, cultural references that no longer made sense got 86d. None of this mattered to the average moviegoer. The cartoon was not the reason they came to the theater. "

There's a link to the "Blue Ribbon reissue of 10/2/48" of Hollywood Steps Out. Looks to be the same cartoon with a different title card.

I read last night somewhere, probably wiki but I stopped at half a dozen places, that the original ending had Gable unmasking what he thought was a girl only to find Groucho. Gable kissed him anyway and said to the audience, a la Lou Costello. "I'm a baaad boy." Gable is said to have objected.

Then Sally Rand's name was changed but the bubble dance remained with the dancer given a similar name.  Supposedly a few frames from that segment were cut after being deemed risqué. 

Those cuts apparently did not survive. 

Edit: The Gable cut was found in 2016. He does say to the audience, "I'm a bad boy," but not in the style of Lou Costello , and he doesn't kiss Groucho.

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15 minutes ago, Moe Howard said:

According to https://texaveryatwb.blogspot.com/2019/09/hollywood-steps-out-and-les-films.html

"Hollywood Steps Out is mostly the film audiences of May 1941 saw. "

However. 

"Hollywood Steps Out is an example of how certain cartoons were altered for their reissue--in this case, seven years after its director had moved on to M-G-M. In this window of time, a war was fought, times changed and some celebrities lost their mass appeal; others matured and no longer resembled their caricatured selves. As wartime gags were scissored from post-war reissues, cultural references that no longer made sense got 86d. None of this mattered to the average moviegoer. The cartoon was not the reason they came to the theater. "

There's a link to the "Blue Ribbon reissue of 10/2/48" of Hollywood Steps Out. Looks to be the same cartoon with a different title card.

Thank you for that info! 
I found it a little bit surprising that so many stars from so many different studios, universal, Fox, MGM, were all in one WB Cartoon.

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56 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

  It seems like the animators did a better job with the male stars than they did with the ladies.

Their depiction of JUDY GARLAND as a CRO MAGNON seems cruel. 

True. The coat check girl was supposedly Paulette Goddard. Never would have guessed.

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14 hours ago, Dargo said:

Sorry Sans, but I still see as many features of Brent's in that drawing as I do of Cugat's.

(...and now please excuse me as I scroll back up for a minute to get another viewing of that babe Abbe Lane...MAN, she was hot!!!)  

I agree that it is George Brent.  The nose is exaggerated but all of the other features look like Brent and he was definitely a big enough star and a WB star which makes it even more likely that he would appear in a Loony Toons cartoon.  I don't see Ameche at all.

 

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8 minutes ago, lydecker said:

I agree that it is George Brent.  The nose is exaggerated but all of the other features look like Brent and he was definitely a big enough star and a WB star which makes it even more likely that he would appear in a Loony Toons cartoon.  I don't see Ameche at all.

 

It would have made sense to have incorporated AMECHE with a phone gag. I’m pretty sure his name was synonymous with the telephone at this point. 

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7 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

ps- he's too old to be ROBERT TAYLOR at the time this cartoon came out. (note the crow's feet)

And George Brent was 37 when this was drawn. Here he is around that time. No crow's feet. (He's not smiling here of course but still the cartoon guy looks much older than 37.) 

 

05a2ae278e279e1226b37562203e224d--george

And here is his wiki photo said to be from 1939.  Maybe a line or two beside the eyes but no stache.

George_Brent_1-M-2004.jpg

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