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Every source I've found says this caricature (the gent in profile you see sitting at the table) is of Don Ameche, but I say it's supposed to be George Brent. What say you?


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9 hours ago, Swithin said:

I once told a friend of mine -- a great classic film buff -- that he reminded me of George Brent. I meant it as a great compliment, but he was offended.

That's because he thought he looked like Errol Flynn.

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2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

On this message board, that "compliment" would insinuate the person has a big caboose. (one of the earliest, long running threads)

I know, my comment to him was before that thread arose, else I certainly wouldn't have made that comparison!

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

That's because he thought he looked like Errol Flynn.

LOL

Yeah, or maybe...Don Ameche!

(...now wouldn't THAT be a coincidence here, EH?!)  ;)

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19 hours ago, LuckyDan said:

It was reissued in 48 as a Blue Ribbon. 

HollywoodStepsOut_TC.png

Exactly. And the wiki notes that some of the characters "altered" for the reissue. 

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How the Communist Witch Hunt Killed John Garfield | Best Movies by Farr

"Sure they leave me out of the cartoon. Everyone else is there - Cagney and Bogart, Raft and Robinson, Sheridan, Flynn, all the other Warners players, all the really big stars but not me. They even got Xavier Cugar. That was Cugar, wasn't it, or was it George Brent? They got a bunch from the other studios, too . But not me. But I'll show 'em. I'll work just that much harder and one day I'll be bigger than any of them. Who knows, one day I might even be on Noir Alley. Ta heck with them and their cartoon!"

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59 minutes ago, Moe Howard said:

Exactly. And the wiki notes that some of the characters "altered" for the reissue. 

I think the edition Dargo posted is the reissue. The opening card shows a copyright date of 1942 (though this film was released in 41) with no blue ribbon, but the title card shown before the opening sequence is spliced in with a date of 2016. 

G5bWErx.png

This site  has a scene-by-scene summary and appears to be the same cut we have. The blogger says it is the 48 reissue. 

I also came across - but didn't bookmark - a version that begins the Ciro's interior with Cary, skipping the mystery diner entirely. 

So, I don't know what if anything was cut or altered from the original 41 release and 48.

A more interesting question is whether Avery had other ideas that Schlesinger vetoed before release. 

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On 7/16/2021 at 11:21 AM, kingrat said:

The cartoon is from 1941. Colbert and Ameche starred together in Midnight in 1939. That might be a reason for putting them at the same table. But the guy looks more like George Brent to me.

But, as I stated a bit earlier, Colbert co-starred in 1941's SKYLARK with BRIAN AHERN, who the cartoon kinda resembles too.  

Sepiatone

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14 hours ago, Dargo said:

I agree with ya Dan that this doesn't look much like Hayworth other than her hair color of red, and even though in the Wiki page for this cartoon short (or at least once again whoever offered up their take of this cartoon short anyway) has identified her as being Hayworth. Excerpted here:

  • Cesar Romero dances with Rita Hayworth; considered to be two of the era's best big-screen dancers, they dance clumsily and spastically and Hayworth's gown is tattered at the bottom from being continuously stepped on.

However, if it WERE supposed to be Ginger Rogers, then wouldn't she have been drawn as a blonde?

(...I think so)

I didn't realize that Cesar Romero was one of the best big-screen dancers? I don't think I've ever seen a movie of his where he dances.  I will be looking out for that.

I believe that it's Rita as well and agree that if it was meant to be Ginger, that she would have been drawn as blonde. 

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

How the Communist Witch Hunt Killed John Garfield | Best Movies by Farr

"Sure they leave me out of the cartoon. Everyone else is there - Cagney and Bogart, Raft and Robinson, Sheridan, Flynn, all the other Warners players, all the really big stars but not me. They even got Xavier Cugar. That was Cugar, wasn't it, or was it George Brent? They got a bunch from the other studios, too . But not me. But I'll show 'em. I'll work just that much harder and one day I'll be bigger than any of them. Who knows, one day I might even be on Noir Alley. Ta heck with them and their cartoon!"

I'm surprised that Bette Davis wasn't included.  I would think that her "Bette Davis Eyes" would make her ripe for parody.

 

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18 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I'm surprised that Bette Davis wasn't included.  I would think that her "Bette Davis Eyes" would make her ripe for parody.

 

Yeh, a bit surprising. Her name made it on a reserved sign on a table, though. There had been a few cartoon parodies of her in the past at Termite Terrace.

She Was an Acrobat's Daughter (Short 1937) - IMDb

This is the Petrified Forest parody from She Was An Acrobat's Daughter.

I was also a bit surprised they didn't make more of Flynn, rather than just have him as one of the "boys." They could have had him sitting at a table with his sword in his hands (please don't take that the wrong way) or dressed as Robin Hood. In 1941 when Hollywood Steps Out was released, Flynn was Warners' biggest male star, with the possible exception of Cagney. Yet Robinson, Raft and Bogart are all given more prominence. Maybe it's because they are physically easier to caricature.

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42 minutes ago, LuckyDan said:

This site  has a scene-by-scene summary and appears to be the same cut we have. The blogger says it is the 48 reissue. 

Yes. I post a link to that site on page 3. And you are correct it says IT is the reissue. There's a link to the cartoon too. It also poo-poos the notion it's Ameche. 

Other than the alleged Gable/Marx smooch no other cuts are noted but that certainly doesn't mean there are no other alterations.  I've got a few books on Avery, not much other than some cells from this cartoon. Then another on WB animation. Other than acknowledging the cartoon, no other info.

The schnoz looks more like Cugat to me. But half of these caricatures bear little resemblance to their counterparts so it's anyones guess.

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On 7/15/2021 at 9:54 PM, sewhite2000 said:

I say absolutely Colbert. Unsure about the other woman. Mustache guy looks more like Brent than Amehce to me.

@1:21 - I agree with your assessment 2000.   I can't think of anyone but Brent who the cartoon character reminds me more of.   Slightly ungrammatical, but I think you get my drift.  

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2 minutes ago, Moe Howard said:

Yes. I post a link to that site on page 3. And you are correct it says IT is the reissue. There's a link to the cartoon too. It also poo-poos the notion it's Ameche. 

Other than the alleged Gable/Marx smooch no other cuts are noted but that certainly doesn't mean there are no other alterations.  I've got a few books on Avery, not much other than some cells from this cartoon. Then another on WB animation. Other than acknowledging the cartoon, no other info.

The schnoz looks more like Cugat to me. But half of these caricatures bear little resemblance to their counterparts so it's anyones guess.

I had to search for pics of Cugat. I had no idea what he looked like. I doubt I would have known in 1941 either. 

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4 minutes ago, LuckyDan said:

I had to search for pics of Cugat. I had no idea what he looked like. I doubt I would have known in 1941 either. 

He could have been added. By 1948 he had several films under his belt and a successful West Hollywood eatery.

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32 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Yeh, a bit surprising. Her name made it on a reserved sign on a table, though. There had been a few cartoon parodies of her in the past at Termite Terrace.

She Was an Acrobat's Daughter (Short 1937) - IMDb

This is the Petrified Forest parody from She Was An Acrobat's Daughter.

I was also a bit surprised they didn't make more of Flynn, rather than just have him as one of the "boys." They could have had him sitting at a table with his sword in his hands (please don't take that the wrong way) or dressed as Robin Hood. In 1941 when Hollywood Steps Out was released, Flynn was Warners' biggest male star, with the possible exception of Cagney. Yet Robinson, Raft and Bogart are all given more prominence. Maybe it's because they are physically easier to caricature.

The ability to caricature probably plays a role in it, I think the only really remarkable thing about Flynn's caricature was they gave him a prominent cleft chin.   That's also probably why William Powell is featured, he has big eyes.  And C. Aubrey Smith with his prominent nose. I'm surprised that Spencer Tracy was included but Katharine Hepburn was not.  By 1941, she would have been a big star again. 

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

I didn't realize that Cesar Romero was one of the best big-screen dancers? I don't think I've ever seen a movie of his where he dances.  I will be looking out for that.

I believe that it's Rita as well and agree that if it was meant to be Ginger, that she would have been drawn as blonde. 

Cesar Romero dances very well with Betty Grable in 1942's Springtime in the Rockies.

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7 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I didn't realize that Cesar Romero was one of the best big-screen dancers? I don't think I've ever seen a movie of his where he dances.  I will be looking out for that.

I believe that it's Rita as well and agree that if it was meant to be Ginger, that she would have been drawn as blonde. 

Maybe I need to look up who Rita Hayworth is cuz the chick I thought she was did not have red hair and was not that big in 1941. 

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9 hours ago, LuckyDan said:

I think the edition Dargo posted is the reissue. The opening card shows a copyright date of 1942 (though this film was released in 41) with no blue ribbon, but the title card shown before the opening sequence is spliced in with a date of 2016. 

G5bWErx.png

This site  has a scene-by-scene summary and appears to be the same cut we have. The blogger says it is the 48 reissue. 

I also came across - but didn't bookmark - a version that begins the Ciro's interior with Cary, skipping the mystery diner entirely. 

So, I don't know what if anything was cut or altered from the original 41 release and 48.

A more interesting question is whether Avery had other ideas that Schlesinger vetoed before release. 

Thanks for the link to that Tex Avery website/blog, Dan. 

TERRIFIC find, and one in which, yes, ALSO questions the (Wikipedia) identification of not only the man-in-question of my thread here but also that of the "Paulette Goodard" and the "Rita Hayworth" caricatures. The more I look at the gal who's dancing with Cesar Romero, the more I think you might be right about it possibly being Ginger Rogers, although I still can't figure out why the cartoon artist would paint her with red hair.

(...you da man, dude...thanks again!)

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9 hours ago, Dargo said:

possibly being Ginger Rogers, although I still can't figure out why the cartoon artist would paint her with red hair

Ginger Rogers has been blonde, brunette & redhead (which just looks mid tone in B&W movies) These are hand colored B&W pics, but give you some idea:

ginger-rogers-in-rko-publicity-everett.jkitty-foyle-ginger-rogers-1940-everett.jginger_rogers.jpg

I think most recognise Ginger as platinum blonde because that was how she looked in those famous movies dancing with Astaire. Watching a B&W movie, a person might imagine her as a redhead because of her name, "Ginger".

Because she was famous for dancing with Fred, I think that was Ginger depicted. Redhead Rita Hayworth was also known as a dancer, but was famous just a little later than the cartoon.

It's very hard to draw caricatures well within the parameters of animation. No one could caricature as well as Hirschfeld.

Although that guy who made those computer graphic SUTS caricatures a few years ago was brilliant: 

Niven.jpg

Even drawing a woman:

Dunaway.jpg

(haha I love those two squares for nostrils)

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20 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I didn't realize that Cesar Romero was one of the best big-screen dancers? I don't think I've ever seen a movie of his where he dances.  I will be looking out for that.

that's how he got his whole start, his popular nickname "BUTCH" came courtesy of lifelong friend JOAN CRAWFORD, who was stunned when she found out he was gay.

 

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7 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Ginger Rogers has been blonde, brunette & redhead (which just looks mid tone in B&W movies) These are hand colored B&W pics, but give you some idea:

ginger-rogers-in-rko-publicity-everett.jkitty-foyle-ginger-rogers-1940-everett.jginger_rogers.jpg

I think most recognise Ginger as platinum blonde because that was how she looked in those famous movies dancing with Astaire. Watching a B&W movie, a person might imagine her as a redhead because of her name, "Ginger".

Because she was famous for dancing with Fred, I think that was Ginger depicted. Redhead Rita Hayworth was also known as a dancer, but was famous just a little later than the cartoon.

It's very hard to draw caricatures well within the parameters of animation. No one could caricature as well as Hirschfeld.

Although that guy who made those computer graphic SUTS caricatures a few years ago was brilliant: 

Niven.jpg

Even drawing a woman:

Dunaway.jpg

(haha I love those two squares for nostrils)

I know of some professional illustrators and animators who use large touchscreen panels like a Wacom Cintiq Pro or similar
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ahpUb_RzGJA
connected to their computer to draw with.  Close enough experience to line drawing on paper that they can seamlessly carry over to it - except they can do things like copy swatches and auto-fill for greater productivity.  It's just another tool in the toolbox, probably one was used here.

In-depth review here
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvSeRhrUcCY

 

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

that's how he got his whole start, his popular nickname "BUTCH" came courtesy of lifelong friend JOAN CRAWFORD, who was stunned when she found out he was gay.

 

According to Wikipedia (although of course this being the very same source which states that that's Don Ameche in the aformentioned cartoon, and when instead it is SO damn obvious that it's REALLY George Brent  ;) )  Romero was given his nickname of "Butch" by another person, Lorna. That being his friend and fellow Hollywood actor/dancer George Murphy and who Romero helped get elected as a Senator from California in 1964.

(...and btw, from the look on Joan's face in almost all those pics of her with Cesar, it appears as if she might've thought he could've been the love of her life if only he weren't gay, doesn't it...well, maybe after another guy that's also caricatured in this cartoon anyway...you know, the one with those big ears)

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I'm still(like a dog with a bone) holding out for THIS guy.  Scope some of the profile shots and recall his co-starring with Colbert in a 1941 movie, who is supposedly the woman the man in the cartoon is sitting with, and.....  remember too, the cartoon IS more or less a CARICATURE!

Sepiatone

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