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10 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

There's a 'Trivia' item on the IMDb in regards to DICK TRACY (1990).  I've read it elsewhere, too, that Warren Beatty has a longer cut of "Dick Tracy" in his vault than runs  2h 15m; the theatrical version ran 105m. after cuts were made that were insisted upon by Jeffrey Katzenberg.  However, this 135m. version has not been released on homevideo in any form.  I'd like to see it. 

@Mr. Gorman Oooo…I would, too! 😃

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Here is the thing about creating lists:

There are only so many films one could list as either their favorite films, or what they might consider to be the so-called “Greatest Films”, or most watched films.

One way to create a bonafide “best of list” would be to create a list based on Genre’s.

And for that type of list one could place their titles within categories like the following:
Action
Adventure
Comedy (including Black Comedy)
Crime and Gangster
Drama
Epics/Historical/Period
Horror
Musical
Science Fiction
War (including Anti-War films)
Westerns

And if one really wants to get into the weeds then they could expand on the above categories with Sub-Genre’s:

Biographical Films
Chick Flicks
Courtroom Dramas
Detective and Mystery Films
Disaster Films
Fantasy Films
Film Noir
Guy Films
Melodramas (including Women’s, Weeper and or Tearjerkers)
Road Films
Romance Films
Sports Films
Superhero Films
Supernatural Films
Thriller-Suspense Films
Zombie Films

And then break it down a little further with the following categories:

Animated Films
British Films
Other Foreign Films
Children’s (including Kids, Family oriented films)
Cult Films
Documentary Films
LGBTQ Films
Serial Films
Sexual-Erotic Films
Silent Films

Pick ten films for each category and you end up with A LOT OF films. Once you have compiled each list, one could then decide which film would be able to be classified as to a number ranking. #1 to #100 or so. Or  a true TOP 10 for each category.

Hard choices and this is where IMHO personal preferences comes into play. I may have 1968’s Ice Station Zebra listed as an action film and even though I know the film was not highly rated by the critics, it is a personal favorite of mine, (as it was with Howard Hughes). So probably that film makes it into my top ten.

It really all comes down to what you feel about a film. And that is the way it should be. We can always aspire to select films based on the criteria of “Best” or “Greatest”, but I am not a film critic nor do I have a degree in Film studies. I am just a film fan and I have certain films I love more than others that often I watch more than I probably should.

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46 minutes ago, fxreyman said:

Here is the thing about creating lists:

There are only so many films one could list as either their favorite films, or what they might consider to be the so-called “Greatest Films”, or most watched films.

One way to create a bonafide “best of list” would be to create a list based on Genre’s.

And for that type of list one could place their titles within categories like the following:
Action
Adventure
Comedy (including Black Comedy)
Crime and Gangster
Drama
Epics/Historical/Period
Horror
Musical
Science Fiction
War (including Anti-War films)
Westerns

And if one really wants to get into the weeds then they could expand on the above categories with Sub-Genre’s:

Biographical Films
Chick Flicks
Courtroom Dramas
Detective and Mystery Films
Disaster Films
Fantasy Films
Film Noir
Guy Films
Melodramas (including Women’s, Weeper and or Tearjerkers)
Road Films
Romance Films
Sports Films
Superhero Films
Supernatural Films
Thriller-Suspense Films
Zombie Films

And then break it down a little further with the following categories:

Animated Films
British Films
Other Foreign Films
Children’s (including Kids, Family oriented films)
Cult Films
Documentary Films
LGBTQ Films
Serial Films
Sexual-Erotic Films
Silent Films

Pick ten films for each category and you end up with A LOT OF films. Once you have compiled each list, one could then decide which film would be able to be classified as to a number ranking. #1 to #100 or so. Or  a true TOP 10 for each category.

Hard choices and this is where IMHO personal preferences comes into play. I may have 1968’s Ice Station Zebra listed as an action film and even though I know the film was not highly rated by the critics, it is a personal favorite of mine, (as it was with Howard Hughes). So probably that film makes it into my top ten.

It really all comes down to what you feel about a film. And that is the way it should be. We can always aspire to select films based on the criteria of “Best” or “Greatest”, but I am not a film critic nor do I have a degree in Film studies. I am just a film fan and I have certain films I love more than others that often I watch more than I probably should.

@fxreyman Yes, we talked about this earlier, when you shared your favorites. 

I wouldn’t say my list is completely objective. I don’t think anyone’s could be (even professionals). We all have such a unique perspective…I just know that I’ve thought for years, “If I had a Top Ten list, this would be on it!” - and I recently realized I’d had that thought enough times to make itofficial. ☺️ But these are just the top ten to me. And only up to this point in my life. 

While I don’t have a list that is as detailed as your outline, I started keeping a general list on my phone of movies I’ve seen (and would like to see next) since the beginning of the pandemic. It’s at about 200 now. Maybe one day, if I have lots of time and nothing to do, I can use it to go into full-on AFI Top 100 territory and try to include all the categories you suggest here (although I know you were only doing that to make your point). If I ever did, it would be completely objective and subject to change, of course. ☺️

As we’re revisiting this and I’m putting even more thought into it, I wonder now if critics and professional organizations make lists like this for the same reason I made mine - not to be definitive or declare indisputable perfection, but to highlight films that are special or noteworthy to them - in order to give those movies more attention and inspire others to try them. (And, in my case, there’s the added reason of wanting new movie suggestions in the form of choices that are special / noteworthy to someone else, too.)

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I'll add my list because it's a bit different, but I know I'll be thinking of other great movies tomorrow that I'll wish I had mentioned.  Mainly, I'm just trying to list the ones I've watched over and over and over.

Stella Dallas,  -- Barbara Stanwyck

Mildred Pierce -- Joan Crawford

Now Voyager -- Bette Davis

Leave her to Heaven -- Gene Tierney

Double Indemnity -- Barbara Stanwyck

Too Late for Tears --Lizabeth Scott

Wuthering Heights -- Merle Oberon

Rebecca -- Joan Fontaine

Remains of the Day --Emma Thompson

Howards End -- Emma Thompson

Yep, I like women's movies.  Movies about women, often written by women and  staring women.

 

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18 hours ago, Dargo said:

Jillian, there is another rom-com with this very same title made in 1943 and which you might also want to seek out. It was directed by one of the greats, Ernst Lubitsch.

heaven%2Bcan%2Bwait%2Bfilmplakat%2Bengl.

I've loved this film since I first ran across it years ago. And while its narrative also deals with the thought of an imagined afterlife, it unfolds in a completely different manner than do the Here Comes Mr. Jordan/Heaven Can Wait (1978) films, and yet I think you'll find it just as funny, entertaining and heartwarming as they are.

I second Dargo’s vote for this Heaven Can Wait. This is a great movie. Don Ameche is fabulous as is Charles Coburn, Marjorie Main, and Laird Cregar. Poor Gene Tierney gets saddled with a really ugly wig, but she’s excellent too. 

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21 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I second Dargo’s vote for this Heaven Can Wait. This is a great movie. Don Ameche is fabulous as is Charles Coburn, Marjorie Main, and Laird Cregar. Poor Gene Tierney gets saddled with a really ugly wig, but she’s excellent too. 

Glad you mentioned Ameche here, speedy.

You see, for years and years I never thought he was very interesting in any of the  films I had seen him in, but this all changed after I first caught him in THIS film and in the 1939 rom-com Midnight. Kind of became of fan of his afterwards, in fact.

(...although btw, I STILL say that it was NOT supposed to be him in that "Hollywood Steps Out" cartoon...nope, STILL say that that was supposed to George Brent!!!)  ;)

LOL

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6 hours ago, fxreyman said:

Here is the thing about creating lists:

There are only so many films one could list as either their favorite films, or what they might consider to be the so-called “Greatest Films”, or most watched films.

One way to create a bonafide “best of list” would be to create a list based on Genre’s.

[...]

This is much how I am but I often break it down to decade, country and genre because of the ways genres evolve. 1930s French surrealism has little in common with 1960s French surrealism.

This does result in some gross inequities. It is easy for me to fill a list with 1960s Czech comedies but struggle to name any 1930s German comedies.

 

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8 hours ago, Jillian Atchley said:

@David Proulx Hi! 😊 Thanks for the comments on my list. I’m glad to find someone else who appreciates Fences (as I also feel it is not mentioned enough), and I’m glad I inspired you to try some new movies. 

As for the ones you haven’t seen / would like to watch again, The Straight Story is on Disney+, Whistle Down the Wind and They Shoot Horses may be on YouTube, and A Soldier’s Story and Up the Down Staircase may still be in TCM’s rotation. (They we’re airing occasionally several months ago. That’s how I saw them both.)

I saw The Ten Commandments several times when I was growing up (it airs on local TV during the Easter season), but I haven’t watched it as an adult. I’m sure I’d have an entirely different appreciation for it now.

Regarding lists, I know they’re entirely subjective and ever-changing. I feel those are the 10 all-around best (in regard to excellence) that I’ve seen thus far in life (but that may change eventually - and, as my movie-watching has reached next-level since the pandemic, it may be sooner rather than later ☺️). As far as “favorite” / “most-watched” (movies that have the largest space in my heart and that I return to most often, regardless of technical quality), that would be an almost entirely different list. ☺️ I was inspired to quickly make one in response to someone else’s reply. It’s not “blog post”- quality like the first (as I made it off the cuff) - but between the two lists, I think I’ve come close to covering all the movies I love most at this point in life. I’ll leave it here:

If we’re shifting this to “movies I’ve seen the most” (which, to me, says “sentimental favorites” - as opposed to “best”), then that really changes things for my list.

Quickly ranked by a rough idea of how many times I’ve seen them, my Top 10 Most Watched / Sentimental Favorite Movies are…

1. The Wizard of Oz (1939): This was “baby’s first favorite movie” for me. I’ve adored it since I was 3 or 4 years old (and it’s still my all-time favorite). I had an anniversary VHS for YEARS (with a specially-themed Downy commercial at the beginning and even a few bonus features at the end, novel for its time!) - and I played it so often, I nearly wore it out. But I couldn’t part with it until an anniversary DVD camealong (with even more bonus features!), which I still watch multiple times every year - particularly around Halloween and Thanksgiving for some reason. (But I’ve seen it so many times, I know all its little glitches. That’s why it’s not on my first list.) Many, MANY viewings since age 3 or 4 + all the times as a kid that, inspired by the Downy commercial, I’d don my Dorothy dress, gather my props, pop the VHS in the VCR and act out Dorothy’s part line-by-line along with movie = …I have absolutely no idea how many times I’ve seen it!

2. The Muppet Christmas Carol (1992): Another childhood favorite, and a classic in its own right. I still watch it multiple times throughout each Christmas season, as I have since age 7. The holidays are not complete without it. 

3. Lilo & Stitch (2001): This is a favorite of mine for personal reasons - plus, the beautiful animation! 🤩 I’ve alwayswanted to visit Hawaii, and I like to imagine it’s actually a lot like Lilo’s world. A must-watch every summer since age 16. 

4. Mamma Mia! (2008) & Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again! (2018): Not classics by any means - but my ultimate feel-good films and never-fail pick-me-ups. Pure sunshine in fmovie form.

*The rest of the list are relatively new finds for me, but I’m sure they’ll catch up to most of the others in no time. Each was discovered at some point in the pandemic, when (thanks to working from home and not going out nearly as much) my movie watching reached next-level.*

5. Paddington 2 (2017) [and Paddington (2014), but this a rare instance where I prefer the sequel to the original] - Truly beautiful films that are not just for kids. 

6. Requiem for a Heavyweight (1956 - the originalPlayhouse 90 live teleplay) - For best results (and for a full-length movie experience!), combine with The Man in the Funny Suit (1960)

7. Heaven Can Wait (1978): My new favorite romantic comedy (and much more / much better than that genre generally implies). Tickles my funny-bone, touches my heart, speaks to my soul. Could watch it on repeat. 

8. Mister Roberts (1955): My “work therapy” movie. 

9. Some Came Running (1958): My “heartbreak therapy” movie. (And who doesn’t love Dean Martin as Bama Dillert?)

10. Stan & Ollie (2018): This one’s last only because I had access to it for just a short while. I caught it during a month-long free trial of Starz, and I nearly played it on repeat while it was available to me. I have since learned it took quite a few liberties with real life - but since I didn’t know anything about Laurel & Hardy other than their names before watching, and I was only inspired to research them after (AND, as a movie, it’s just so well done) - I can’t really fault it. The look, the music, the performances (especially Steve Coogan’s Stan!), and the story all make my heart smile….Awww - now I may have to purchase, because I miss it! ☺️

1 - W of O - classic. Saw it for the first time in many a year a few months ago.

2 - Muppet Ch Ca - For Xmas movies, It's a Wonderful Life rules by a long shot for me. I catch it once or twice every year.

3 - L & S - Few cartoons grab my attention. I've enjoyed many I've seen, but I always stumble onto them, rather than try to watch.

4 - M M - I've heard of it, but never seen it.

5 - Pad 1&2 - Again, cartoons and the like don't attract me. If I happen on it, I may watch.

6 - R for a HW - I didn't snap to the Playhose version you prefer. I'm a fan of the 1958 Quinn, Gleason, Rooney classic. Haven't seen another.

7 - H can W - I prefer the '78 version as well w/ Beatty & Mason.

8 - Mr R - Ageed

9 - S came R'g - Good flick, likable stars.

10 - St & Ol - I know they're classics and I should like them, but I just can't love them, try as I have.

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1 hour ago, SansFin said:

This is much how I am but I often break it down to decade, country and genre because of the ways genres evolve. 1930s French surrealism has little in common with 1960s French surrealism.

This does result in some gross inequities. It is easy for me to fill a list with 1960s Czech comedies but struggle to name any 1930s German comedies.

 

WHAT?! Now Sans, HOW in the world could you forget I'll Take Paris by the Springtime?!

YOU know, that comedy by director Hans Von Friedhoffer that showcased those wacky exploits of the Wehrmacht's 8th Cavalry Division.

(...especially can't believe you've forgotten the scene with the talking horse that does that great impression of Hermann Goering...uh-huh, kind'a a like a Teutonic  Mr. Ed...now that horse was GREAT!)

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

WHAT?! Now Sans, HOW in the world could you forget I'll Take Paris by the Springtime?!

YOU know, that comedy by director Hans Von Friedhoffer that showcased those wacky exploits of the Wehrmacht's 8th Cavalry Division.

(...especially can't believe you've forgotten the scene with the talking horse that does that great impression of Hermann Goering...uh-huh, kind'a a like a Teutonic  Mr. Ed...now that horse was GREAT!)

I believe that you are forgetting your film history. The play: I'll Take Paris by Springtime toured London, Moscow and Buenos Aires from 1936 to 1940 but was not filmed until 1941. It was in any event a fantasy and not a comedy.

Or are you confusing it with: Springtime for Hitler

I do not recall a horse doing an impression of Goering. I doubt that any horse would lower himself to imitate a jackass.

The Führer's New Groove did feature a talking llama but that was not released until 2000. 

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4 hours ago, Dargo said:

Glad you mentioned Ameche here, speedy.

You see, for years and years I never thought he was very interesting in any of the  films I had seen him in, but this all changed after I first caught him in THIS film and in the 1939 rom-com Midnight. Kind of became of fan of his afterwards, in fact.

(...although btw, I STILL say that it was NOT supposed to be him in that "Hollywood Steps Out" cartoon...nope, STILL say that that was supposed to George Brent!!!)  ;)

LOL

I really love his voice.  I think I might own Midnight (It's on a Claudette Colbert collection I have), but I don't think I've watched it! I really like in him Heaven Can Wait (like I said), I also think he's fantastic in his films with Betty Grable--Down Argentine Way and Moon Over Miami. He's also really fun in That Night in Rio where he plays dual roles. He's also good in The Feminine Touch with Rosalind Russell and Kay Francis. I also love him in Trading Places which was a career comeback of sorts.  But in all honesty, my first exposure to Ameche was when he voiced Shadow in Homeward Bound (1993).  Even voicing a Golden Retriever, he is so heartwarming and heart wrenching at the same time.   I haven't seen his Oscar-winning role in Cocoon, but I have seen a video of him accepting his Oscar for Cocoon, and he was so gracious and humble--all around seems like he was a great person. 

Now I feel like I'm going to have to go on a binge of Don Ameche movies.  I've been on a Bogart binge.  I don't think Bogart and Ameche ever made a film together...

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20 hours ago, Dargo said:

3Glad you mentioned Ameche here, speedy.

You see, for years and years I never thought he was very interesting in any of the  films I had seen him in, but this all changed after I first caught him in THIS film and in the 1939 rom-com Midnight. Kind of became of fan of his afterwards, in fact.

(...although btw, I STILL say that it was NOT supposed to be him in that "Hollywood Steps Out" cartoon...nope, STILL say that that was supposed to George Brent!!!)  ;)

LOL

Ameche was an actor I found from the Eddie Murphy film Trading Places.    When I first saw the film,   I didn't know much about him but was highly aware of fellow actor Ralph Bellamy.     So I worked my way back,   looking for his earlier work on TCM.      Midnight is also my favorite film he is in.

Ameche didn't make many films for TCM's big-three (MGM,  RKO,  and Warner),    and that is one reason we don't see him much,  especially those 30s\40s Paramount and 20th Century Fox films.       E.g.  when was the last time TCM showed  Midnight?     

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On 9/8/2021 at 4:50 PM, AndreaDoria said:

I'll add my list because it's a bit different, but I know I'll be thinking of other great movies tomorrow that I'll wish I had mentioned.  Mainly, I'm just trying to list the ones I've watched over and over and over.

Stella Dallas,  -- Barbara Stanwyck

Mildred Pierce -- Joan Crawford

Now Voyager -- Bette Davis

Leave her to Heaven -- Gene Tierney

Double Indemnity -- Barbara Stanwyck

Too Late for Tears --Lizabeth Scott

Wuthering Heights -- Merle Oberon

Rebecca -- Joan Fontaine

Remains of the Day --Emma Thompson

Howards End -- Emma Thompson

Yep, I like women's movies.  Movies about women, often written by women and  staring women.

 

@AndreaDoria Hi! 😊 I was inspired to make a “have watched over and over” list, too, in response to someone else’s reply. Here’s mine:

1. The Wizard of Oz (1939): This was “baby’s first favorite movie” for me. I’ve adored it since I was 3 or 4 years old (and it’s still my all-time favorite). I had an anniversary VHS for YEARS (with a specially-themed Downy commercial at the beginning and even a few bonus features at the end, novel for its time!) - and I played it so often, I nearly wore it out. But I couldn’t part with it until an anniversary DVD came along (with even more bonus features!), which I still watch multiple times every year - particularly around Halloween and Thanksgiving for some reason. (But I’ve seen it so manytimes, I know all its little glitches. That’s why it’s not on my first list.) Many, MANY viewings since age 3 or 4 + all the times as a kid that, inspired by the Downy commercial, I’d don my Dorothy dress, gather my props, pop the VHS in the VCR and act out Dorothy’s part line-by-line along with movie = …I have absolutely no idea how many times I’ve seen it!

2. The Muppet Christmas Carol (1992): Another childhood favorite, and a classic in its own right. I still watch it multiple times throughout each Christmas season, as I have since age 7. The holidays are not complete without it. 

3. Lilo & Stitch (2001): This is a favorite of mine for personal reasons - plus, the beautiful animation! 🤩 I’ve always wanted to visit Hawaii, and I like to imagine it’s actually a lot like Lilo’s world. A must-watch every summer since age 16. 

4. Mamma Mia! (2008) & Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again! (2018): Not classics by any means - but my ultimate feel-good films and never-fail pick-me-ups. Pure sunshine in fmovie form.

*The rest of the list are relatively new finds for me, but I’m sure they’ll catch up to most of the others in no time. Each was discovered at some point in the pandemic, when (thanks toworking from home and not going out nearly as much) my movie watching reached next-level.*

5. Paddington 2 (2017) [and Paddington (2014), but this a rare instance where I prefer the sequel to the original] - Truly beautiful films that are not just for kids. 

6. Requiem for a Heavyweight (1956 - the original Playhouse 90 live teleplay) - For best results (and for a full-length movie experience!), combine with The Man in the Funny Suit (1960)

7. Heaven Can Wait (1978): My new favorite romantic comedy (and much more / much better than that genre generally implies). Tickles my funny-bone, touches my heart, speaks to my soul. Could watch it on repeat. 

8. Mister Roberts (1955): My “work therapy” movie. 

9. Some Came Running (1958): My “heartbreak therapy” movie. (And who doesn’t love Dean Martin as Bama Dillert?)

10. Stan & Ollie (2018): This one’s last only because I had access to it for just a short while. I caught it during a month-long free trial of Starz, and I nearly played it on repeat while it was available to me. I have since learned it took quite a few liberties with real life - but since I didn’t know anything about Laurel & Hardy other than their names before watching, and I was only inspired to research them after (AND, as a movie, it’s just so well done) - I can’t really fault it. The look, the music, the performances (especially Steve Coogan’s Stan!), and the story all make my heart smile….Awww - now I may have to purchase, because I miss it! ☺️

***

In regard to your list, I’m surprised to say I’ve only seen Double Indemnity. 🙈 Those are all some ICONIC films that I’ve heard so much about, I almost FEEL like I’ve watched them, even though I haven’t. (I need to catch up! ☺️
 

I have seen, and really enjoy, Emma Thompson’s Sense and Sensibility - which, to me, is the best adaption of that story by far. And knowing she wrote the screenplay does make watching her performance extra-special. 🤩

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On 9/8/2021 at 5:31 PM, Dargo said:

Glad you mentioned Ameche here, speedy.

You see, for years and years I never thought he was very interesting in any of the  films I had seen him in, but this all changed after I first caught him in THIS film and in the 1939 rom-com Midnight. Kind of became of fan of his afterwards, in fact.

(...although btw, I STILL say that it was NOT supposed to be him in that "Hollywood Steps Out" cartoon...nope, STILL say that that was supposed to George Brent!!!)  ;)

LOL

@Dargo @speedracer5  @JamesJazGuitar I am really unfamiliar with Don Ameche’s work. I believe the only film of his I’ve ever seen is, Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey (he was the voice of  Shadow, the Golden Retriever) - and I haven’t even watched that in years. 🙈 (But I really liked it as a kid! ☺️)

PS - I just read your later comment, @speedracer5! I love his voice, too! 😃 Even as a little girl, I found it very moving - and it’s still memorable to me now. (That part where he’s hurt and doesn’t think he can keep going…🥺🥺🥺!!! So real, yet just his voice. It amazes me when actors can give a genuine performance like that in a voice-over role. 🤩)

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1. Citizen Kane (1941)

2. Dr. Strangelove (1964)

3. The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957)

4. On the Waterfront (1954)

5. Casablanca (1942)

6. Paths of Glory (1957)

7. Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

8. The Wild Bunch (1969)

9. The Conformist (1970)

10. Raging Bull (1980)

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On 9/8/2021 at 7:10 PM, David Proulx said:

1 - W of O - classic. Saw it for the first time in many a year a few months ago.

2 - Muppet Ch Ca - For Xmas movies, It's a Wonderful Life rules by a long shot for me. I catch it once or twice every year.

3 - L & S - Few cartoons grab my attention. I've enjoyed many I've seen, but I always stumble onto them, rather than try to watch.

4 - M M - I've heard of it, but never seen it.

5 - Pad 1&2 - Again, cartoons and the like don't attract me. If I happen on it, I may watch.

6 - R for a HW - I didn't snap to the Playhose version you prefer. I'm a fan of the 1958 Quinn, Gleason, Rooney classic. Haven't seen another.

7 - H can W - I prefer the '78 version as well w/ Beatty & Mason.

8 - Mr R - Ageed

9 - S came R'g - Good flick, likable stars.

10 - St & Ol - I know they're classics and I should like them, but I just can't love them, try as I have.

@David Proulx Oooo…You should really check out the Playhouse 90 Requiem - if for no other reason than comparison. 😃 Technically the same story (some scenes, especially early on, are practically line for line), but totally different tones - and totally different outcomes. And such unique takes on the characters! The main four players in both all turn in such nuanced performances - but both players in each role put their own personal spin on it, which only adds to the dimension of the characters. It just goes to show how much can be mined from incredible writing. 🤩

Rod Serling wrote both, and Ralph Nelson directed both. I LOVE the look of the film. And while there’s not much to be said about the visuals of the Playhouse version, since it’s on kinescope (although there are some “restored” versions on YouTube) - just the fact that it’s so captivating in spite of the hinderances of early live TV says a lot. 🌟

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36 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

1. Citizen Kane (1941)

2. Dr. Strangelove (1964)

3. The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957)

4. On the Waterfront (1954)

5. Casablanca (1942)

6. Paths of Glory (1957)

7. Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

8. The Wild Bunch (1969)

9. The Conformist (1970)

10. Raging Bull (1980)

@Bogie56 Hi! 😊 Wow - this is another list where I’ve heard so much about most of these films, but haven’t actually WATCHED them. ☺️

I have seen On the Waterfront and Casablanca, though. They’re incredible - Waterfront, in particular. (All the Terry & Edie scenes and all of Karl Malden’s moments just kill me. 🤩)

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20 hours ago, Jillian Atchley said:

@David Proulx Oooo…You should really check out the Playhouse 90 Requiem - if for no other reason than comparison. 😃 Technically the same story (some scenes, especially early on, are practically line for line), but totally different tones - and totally different outcomes. And such unique takes on the characters! The main four players in both all turn in such nuanced performances - but both players in each role put their own personal spin on it, which only adds to the dimension of the characters. It just goes to show how much can be mined from incredible writing. 🤩

Rod Serling wrote both, and Ralph Nelson directed both. I LOVE the look of the film. And while there’s not much to be said about the visuals of the Playhouse version, since it’s on kinescope (although there are some “restored” versions on YouTube) - just the fact that it’s so captivating in spite of the hinderances of early live TV says a lot. 🌟

Good call on the Playhouse 90 version! I followed your advice and just watched it. I liked it a lot. Palance did a much better job than I envisioned it. It also had a less depressing ending.

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4 hours ago, David Proulx said:

Good call on the Playhouse 90 version! I followed your advice and just watched it. I liked it a lot. Palance did a much better job than I envisioned it. It also had a less depressing ending.

@David Proulx 😃 Oh, I’m so glad you watched and enjoyed! Yes, Jack Palance completely surprised me, too (and stole my heart 🥰). He won an Emmy for it. I believe the episode itself won awards (Emmys for writing and direction and a Peabody), and Ed Wynn was nominated for an Emmy. I feel Keenan and Kim Hunter should have been recognized as well - but then again, I think both versions should’ve won all the awards. ☺️

I much prefer the original ending. Not necessarily because it’s lighter, but because I feel the movie had to make a couple of illogical changes to make the darker ending work. And, while the film version is more realistic in tone, it almost destroys the original‘s hopeful message (and removes some of Maish’s complexity).

According to a book that has both the original teleplay and an almost-novella version of the story, plus all this extra info from Rod Serling and others, Serling was never happy with the final scene on the train. Maybe that’s why he explored the darker ending. The almost-novella is sort of a mix of both versions plus some new stuff, and its ending is even slightly different from the film.

Since you like the original, I HIGHLY recommend The Man in the Funny Suit - an episode of Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse (it’s shorter than Playhouse 90, maybe only 45 minutes long?) about the story behind the making of Requiem, particularly concerning Ed and Keenan Wynn - and how a serious role like this was an incredibly difficult departure (that turned into a triumphant career-restart) for the once-great comedian, Ed. It was written and directed by Ralph Nelson, and not only do Ed and Keenan play themselves, but Nelson, Serling, Maxie Rosenbloom, Ned Glass, some of the Requiem crew, and Red Skelton do, too! (It’s also on YouTube. I think that may be the only way to find it now…I originally watched both on Prime Video, but they’re no longer available. ☹️)

When I first watched The Man in the Funny Suit, even though I really enjoyed it, I thought, “There’s NO WAY that happened!” But according to Keenan’s book Ed Wynn’s Son, a Life magazine profile (written after the original Requiem, but before Keenan’s book and Funny Suit), and an LA Times piece on Red Skelton, it’s ALL true. 😃 I’ve found either documentation of or support for even the most dramatic, Hollywood-ish details. (So, if some aspect of it isn’t true - at least all the details can be traced back to someplace.) In fact, the only changes Funny Suit seems to have made is combining details to simplify the story - rather than embellishing to make it more dramatic, as I had assumed. 

It’s a little schmaltzy, but it’s such a great story that’s so well done and very interesting to watch - especially since it’s apparently true. (And, based on the pictures in Keenan’s book, some scenes were filmed in his home and in Ed’s apartment - which is neat to see!) Plus, not only does Nelson do an excellent job directing, as he did with both Requiems (there are lots of neat shots in this involving shadows and mirrors that I especially like), he ties Ed’s personal story together with Mountain’s and the “when you’re down, get back up” theme of the original.

As you can tell, I really fell down the rabbit hole when it comes to this story - but, all versions of it taken together, I think it is my all-time favorite. 💖 I actually discovered Funny Suit first. I find “acting families” fascinating, so it caught my attention when I stumbled across it about a year ago. After watching it, I HAD to watch the original - which led to the film and all kinds of research (including Ed Wynn’s Son and the profiles I mentioned), then the Requiem book - and here we are. I’m a total Requiem fan. ☺️

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4 hours ago, Jillian Atchley said:

@David Proulx 😃 Oh, I’m so glad you watched and enjoyed! Yes, Jack Palance completely surprised me, too (and stole my heart 🥰). He won an Emmy for it. I believe the episode itself won awards (Emmys for writing and direction and a Peabody), and Ed Wynn was nominated for an Emmy. I feel Keenan and Kim Hunter should have been recognized as well - but then again, I think both versions should’ve won all the awards. ☺️

I much prefer the original ending. Not necessarily because it’s lighter, but because I feel the movie had to make a couple of illogical changes to make the darker ending work. And, while the film version is more realistic in tone, it almost destroys the original‘s hopeful message (and removes some of Maish’s complexity).

According to a book that has both the original teleplay and an almost-novella version of the story, plus all this extra info from Rod Serling and others, Serling was never happy with the final scene on the train. Maybe that’s why he explored the darker ending. The almost-novella is sort of a mix of both versions plus some new stuff, and its ending is even slightly different from the film.

Since you like the original, I HIGHLY recommend The Man in the Funny Suit - an episode of Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse (it’s shorter than Playhouse 90, maybe only 45 minutes long?) about the story behind the making of Requiem, particularly concerning Ed and Keenan Wynn - and how a serious role like this was an incredibly difficult departure (that turned into a triumphant career-restart) for the once-great comedian, Ed. It was written and directed by Ralph Nelson, and not only do Ed and Keenan play themselves, but Nelson, Serling, Maxie Rosenbloom, Ned Glass, some of the Requiem crew, and Red Skelton do, too! (It’s also on YouTube. I think that may be the only way to find it now…I originally watched both on Prime Video, but they’re no longer available. ☹️)

When I first watched The Man in the Funny Suit, even though I really enjoyed it, I thought, “There’s NO WAY that happened!” But according to Keenan’s book Ed Wynn’s Son, a Life magazine profile (written after the original Requiem, but before Keenan’s book and Funny Suit), and an LA Times piece on Red Skelton, it’s ALL true. 😃 I’ve found either documentation of or support for even the most dramatic, Hollywood-ish details. (So, if some aspect of it isn’t true - at least all the details can be traced back to someplace.) In fact, the only changes Funny Suit seems to have made is combining details to simplify the story - rather than embellishing to make it more dramatic, as I had assumed. 

It’s a little schmaltzy, but it’s such a great story that’s so well done and very interesting to watch - especially since it’s apparently true. (And, based on the pictures in Keenan’s book, some scenes were filmed in his home and in Ed’s apartment - which is neat to see!) Plus, not only does Nelson do an excellent job directing, as he did with both Requiems (there are lots of neat shots in this involving shadows and mirrors that I especially like), he ties Ed’s personal story together with Mountain’s and the “when you’re down, get back up” theme of the original.

As you can tell, I really fell down the rabbit hole when it comes to this story - but, all versions of it taken together, I think it is my all-time favorite. 💖 I actually discovered Funny Suit first. I find “acting families” fascinating, so it caught my attention when I stumbled across it about a year ago. After watching it, I HAD to watch the original - which led to the film and all kinds of research (including Ed Wynn’s Son and the profiles I mentioned), then the Requiem book - and here we are. I’m a total Requiem fan. ☺️

I just watched The Man in the Funny Suit. Another great tip! I had the exact opposite reaction to it that you did. My feeling was "There's NO way this CAN'T be true". There's no way, using all real names, that the Wynns would subject themselves to such humiliation for Ed and the intimacy of their relationship. Also, Serling and rest of the surrounding cast (again, using real names and playing themselves) would allow the behind the scenes comments to be thrown out there w/o it being true and consented to by the Wynns themselves. While it all worked out, it wasn't flattering to Ed, for the most part, so, yeah, I have no doubt this actually happened. The only thing I would question is the abruptness of a quality performance by Ed. I'm guessing he started turning the corner before the MORNING OF THE LIVE AIRING, and they presented it as an absolute shocker to everyone for dramatic license.

 

That said, I still like the Gleason/Rooney combo much better, but now have much more respect for the Wynns'. I also thought Kim Hunter & Julie Harris were a wash. They both did equally as good a job, and were interchangeable

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My list of favorites is always changing since I'm a huge movie freak, but here goes for the time being:

 

1. THE SOUND OF MUSIC

2. ALL ABOUT EVE

3. CASABLANCA

4. WHITE HEAT

5. IT'S A MAD, MAD, MAD, MAD WORLD

6. PSYCHO

7. BRINGING UP BABY

8. TWELVE ANGRY MEN

9. THE ROARING TWENTIES

10. THE SEARCHERS

Of course this is from the golden years of Hollywood, and it's extremely difficult to limit it to just 10. I'll have to think a little bit from the modern age of filmmaking (the 1970's up to the present).

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17 hours ago, David Proulx said:

I just watched The Man in the Funny Suit. Another great tip! I had the exact opposite reaction to it that you did. My feeling was "There's NO way this CAN'T be true". There's no way, using all real names, that the Wynns would subject themselves to such humiliation for Ed and the intimacy of their relationship. Also, Serling and rest of the surrounding cast (again, using real names and playing themselves) would allow the behind the scenes comments to be thrown out there w/o it being true and consented to by the Wynns themselves. While it all worked out, it wasn't flattering to Ed, for the most part, so, yeah, I have no doubt this actually happened. The only thing I would question is the abruptness of a quality performance by Ed. I'm guessing he started turning the corner before the MORNING OF THE LIVE AIRING, and they presented it as an absolute shocker to everyone for dramatic license.

 

That said, I still like the Gleason/Rooney combo much better, but now have much more respect for the Wynns'. I also thought Kim Hunter & Julie Harris were a wash. They both did equally as good a job, and were interchangeable

@David Proulx Hey! 😃 I’m glad you enjoyed it! 😊 

Those are all good points as to why it would be true…I tend to be skeptical of dramatized “true stories” anyway, so maybe some natural bias played into my opinion. I had no doubt the core of it was real - I just thought the details were likely embellished to make it a TV-quality story. But my skepticism prompted me to research, which has been fun and enlightening. I have a greater respect and appreciation for the Wynns, Nelson, and Serling myself now - and Jack Palance, whose role was left out of Funny Suit. He noticed what was going on (how much Ed was struggling and how unhappy everybody was), went to the producer himself, and said if Ed was let go, he’d leave, too. (That poor producer! Totally in the middle.) Then he worked with Ed as well, just the two of them on weekends. He’s quoted as saying that he didn’t want him to be let go, because “I felt there was a great loneliness there that needed to be looked at.” (I think I have that right.) That touched me. 💖

The only part I was almost sure had to be made up (or at least very heavily embellished) was Ed showing up drunk, plus all of Red Skelton’s involvement. And when Keenan’s book didn’t mention either incident at all, I was even more certain. But Life magazine includes that part of the story, and the LA Times piece mentions Skelton’s side of it. (Apparently, he even offered to play the role himself if an incident like that happened again or if there was just no way Ed could go on…I also learned in my research that he and Ed were quite close, in a “mentor and substitute father / mentee” sort of way, which makes it all that much sweeter.)

Interestingly, according to Keenan (and maybe Life, too, I don’t remember), Ed actually did very poorly in the morning rehearsal. (If I recall correctly, the day before was better - then the morning of was bad again.) So, I’d imagine everyone really was that doubtful and nervous. (But isn’t there a saying about “bad rehearsal, good performance”?) Keenan says one spot that was always difficult for Ed was the very beginning - knowing exactly when to speak after walking down that long corridor, as he had the very first line of the show! Keenan was so nervous that he wouldn’t he hit it for the broadcast and was concentrating so hard on him, he blew his own first lines. He said the next time there was a pause, he thought, “Whose turn is it now???” - and it was his. ☺️ I don’t think he actually flat-out “blew” any lines - but watching with that story in mind, Keenan does seem hesitant to come in at first. His timing seems just a teeny bit off. (The story went further and was far more exaggerated in his book, but it’s very possible that the experience grew in his memory over time - and it probably felt like a much bigger deal than it looked on TV.)

While it does seem mostly unflattering for Ed, Funny Suit aired after he had been very successful in more dramatic roles on film and television. (In fact, earlier that year, he was Oscar-nominated for his performance in The Diary of Anne Frank.) I’m sure he was quite confident in his ability at that point going in to Funny Suit, so I take it less as “Look how awful and embarrassing I was” and more as “Look how far I’ve come!” That said, you’re right - it’s a VERY personal and intimate story, so it still took guts. (And can you imagine playing a version of yourself doing so badly, now that you not only know how to do better, but you also know how you drove everyone else crazy at the time? Wow.) 

I’ve got such a soft spot for the Wynns now, and I actually love how well their natural father-son dynamic played into their characters, and how the age difference gave the trio a sort of “grandfather, father, son” feel. (They even call Mountain “kid” a lot.) It also makes Army a little pitiful, because you can see how much he loves Mountain AND Maish. He’s stuck in the middle, and can’t leave either one. (Plus, at his age, where would he go if he wanted to?) He’s SUCH a loyal guy (out of devotion and circumstance) that the “Army, you’re needed.” moment near the end just kills me. He just drops his head because he knows he’s needed - and he knows he’s not going anywhere. 

You don’t get that angle with the film - but Gleason and Rooney ARE a MUCH more realistic fit for that world. (Actually, Rooney’s Army fits Rod’s description in the original teleplay to a T…He was never intended to be an older man. Ed was certainly a case of stunt-casting at its finest.) And I love how the difference in their size is played with!  Jackie’s so big and talks all tough - but can somehow make himself seem so small when Mickey confronts him. There are times when it seems like Mickey towers over him, which is so cool. 

Of the two ladies, I choose Kim Hunter - only because I love how she gradually opens up. (Grace at the end is a different person than Grace in her first scene in the office.) But maybe that’s only because we get more of an opportunity to watch that process. Even though Julie Harris gets new scenes, it’s almost as if she has less to work with as a character - less opportunity for change. But of course, that’s getting to a really picky, hair-splitting level. Both are performances are excellent. 🤩

Wow. I didn’t realize I’d have THAT much to say. 🙈 No one in my real life is into this story quite as much as I am. (In fact, only one other person I know has watched Funny Suit.) So, I appreciate having someone to share / discuss these thoughts with. 😊

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6 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

My list of favorites is always changing since I'm a huge movie freak, but here goes for the time being:

 

1. THE SOUND OF MUSIC

2. ALL ABOUT EVE

3. CASABLANCA

4. WHITE HEAT

5. IT'S A MAD, MAD, MAD, MAD WORLD

6. PSYCHO

7. BRINGING UP BABY

8. TWELVE ANGRY MEN

9. THE ROARING TWENTIES

10. THE SEARCHERS

Of course this is from the golden years of Hollywood, and it's extremely difficult to limit it to just 10. I'll have to think a little bit from the modern age of filmmaking (the 1970's up to the present).

@Bethluvsfilms Hi! 😊 I’ve seen a few from your list (The Sound of Music, All About Eve, Casablanca), all of which I enjoy very much. I’ll keep an eye out for the rest…The Roaring Twenties is in my DVR, but I haven’t watched it yet. I want to, though - because of the Carol Burnett Show connection. Have you seen her parody sketch, The Boring Twenties (starring Carol, Harvey, Steve Lawrence, and Sally Struthers)? It’s one of my favorites! 🥰

There is one film on your list that I distinctly did not enjoy when I saw it…Funny story about my experience with Psycho: I was 8 years old, and my mom and I had just gotten back from an overnight Girls Scouts camping trip. I’m sure she was dead tired from chaperoning and wasn’t really thinking, because when we were looking for something to watch on TV and found Psycho, she was like, “Oh, this is a good movie.” ☺️ I’ve always loved classic films and mysteries, so I was down for it. (Of course, this isn’t exactly a mystery - but I was 8, what did I know?) This was also in our dark, basement den, which really set the mood…My mom falls asleep pretty quickly. I’m totally into it, but I see the shower scene, and FREAK OUT. Cry hysterically, startle my mom awake, flip off the television. As soon as Mom calms me down, the first thing I say is, “I want to know how it ends!” 😄 So, we turn it back on, she falls asleep again, I get to the cop on the stairs, and - repeat process. More hysterical crying. But again, I just couldn’t stand it. 🙈 Same thing happens with the discovery of the mother - but I STILL couldn’t walk away. 😆  By this time, my poor, sleep-deprived mom is wide awake, so we finally make it through the ending together. 

It may sound like I was a glutton for punishment, but I think it actually speaks to how well done the move is - even though it terrified me (and probably scarred me for life over and over again), I HAD to see it through. Over the years, I’ve gone back to films that I was too young to appreciate the first time - but I’ve never had a desire to rewatch Psycho. I don’t need to - those scenes (and that musical “knife noise”!) are burnt in my brain. The ending is a little fuzzy to me now, but I do remember, “I heard it - from the mother.” ☺️

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Okay, here's my top 10 films from the 1970's up to the present:

 

1. THE GODFATHER

2. E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL

3. TITANIC

4. THE GODFATHER PART II

5. THE CONVERSATON

6. CHINATOWN

7. UNFORGIVEN

8. GLADIATOR

9. SCHINDLER'S LIST

10. SAVING PRIVATE RYAN

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16 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Okay, here's my top 10 films from the 1970's up to the present:

 

1. THE GODFATHER

2. E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL

3. TITANIC

4. THE GODFATHER PART II

5. THE CONVERSATON

6. CHINATOWN

7. UNFORGIVEN

8. GLADIATOR

9. SCHINDLER'S LIST

10. SAVING PRIVATE RYAN

@Bethluvsfilms Interesting! 😃 I flipped for Titanic when it came out. (Like many, many pre-teen girls, I was crazy about Leo. ☺️…Just thinking of him at that staircase and in that tux still makes me go all 😍😍 😍!!!) I’ve seen E.T. and Schindler’s List, too. Very memorable experiences.

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