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Hello, my name is Jillian – and I’m a message board / blogging newbie. (But a long-time TCM viewer!)

This is my first post (here and on my blog, The Classic Film Connection). I hope to use both spaces to connect with fellow classic movie fans.

As a means of introduction, I thought I’d share my personal list of the top ten best films I’ve seen so far in my lifetime. If one picture is worth a thousand words, then maybe ten pictures (plus some words) will tell you everything you need to know about me.

Not all of these movies are from a classic era, but most are. And I hadn’t realized before making this list – but I clearly have a favorite decade!

Each film’s title is connected to its IMDb page.

Here we go (from #10 – the #1 best!)…

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#10: The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965)

More of an experience than entertainment, this film is almost beyond comparison – even to other Biblical epics. Its artistry is second to none (pause it at any point, and it looks like a painting!), and the level of depth and detail in the story are unmatched. Every time I watch it, I notice something new.

Like most ambitiously passionate creative works, there are flaws here and there. Every moment may not land with the desired meaning and impact, but the intention is always clear – and it is beautiful.

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#9: The Straight Story (1999)

I never thought a movie about a guy riding a lawnmower would be so enthralling!

Based on a true story, this film’s hero is totally unique: a quiet, elderly gentleman – who is sharp and smart, and who defies limitations by undertaking the greatest feat of ingenuity I’ve ever seen!

Richard Farnsworth carries the show, assisted by some equally good supporting performers and absolutely gorgeous cinematography. The people around him are ALMOST too quirky to be real, but that line is never completely crossed. And it all plays out like a story an old man would tell – a little slow, but full of colorful details and plain-spoken wisdom.

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#8: Lilies of the Field (1963)

This is a simple story told in a straightforward way – but it’s so beautiful, it sparkles. I wouldn’t call it a “perfect” movie – yet that really doesn’t matter in light of its heart, which just shines through the screen.

And it’s too good to be considered merely a sentimental favorite…There’s a passionate energy that sets it apart – plus something else I can’t quite name. Something holy, I think.

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#7: Fences (2016)

The first time I saw this movie, the impact of its meaning didn’t hit me until well after I left the theater. But when it hit, it blew me away.

This is a truly dramatic film. Based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning play, its style feels a bit talky and theatrical until you get used to it – and there’s a relentlessness and a hardness in all that talking that makes it tough to sit through. But just stick with it, because the last act is POWERFUL – and the ending wouldn’t mean nearly as much without all the pain endured to get there.

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#6: Whistle Down the Wind (1961)

This is a seemingly simple film – but it’s filled with Biblical allusion, and it leaves deeper meaning up to interpretation. Personally, I think it’s a story about the power of child-like faith – and how easily it can turn complicated.

Also notable for its large cast of remarkably natural non-actor children (Hayley Mills being one of the few with professional experience at the time), this movie provides the most understanding, well-rounded look at the whole of childhood – and all the positives and negatives of that stage of life – that I’ve ever seen on screen.

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#5: A Soldier’s Story (1985)

A twisty yet tight whodunit that makes larger, nuanced points while solving its mystery. The cast and the music are ON FIRE – particularly Patti LaBelle (!!!) and Larry Riley’s in-character musical performances. When they sing together, it’s almost too much star-power for one screen!

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#4: Up the Down Staircase (1967)

This should be required viewing for all aspiring teachers. (And it could be used as encouragement/therapy for all current/formers ones, too – staff and administrators included!)

This film IS life in public education – especially in a low-funded system. And it’s timelessly relevant regardless of grade-level or environment: I taught primary grades in rural systems, not inner-city high-school – but I faced a version of nearly every issue presented here.

Filling the school with non-professional teens to act as the students (and casting several in key roles) was a particularly genius move that adds even more realism. This movie somehow strikes a magical balance – it’s perfectly honest, yet still thoroughly cinematic. (The only reason it’s not even higher on my list is because it’s SO true-to-life, it’s a little difficult for me to watch.)

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#3: The Hustler (1961)

In many ways, this one is the ultimate: its direction and cinematography are the most interesting, its characters are the most complex. And it’s got Jackie Gleason in a strictly dramatic role, demonstrating with very limited screen time why he deserves to be called The Great One – shooting his own pool and operating on a whole other level than the rest of the already fantastic cast.

Its style is unbeatable – and its depth of detail and commentary on life are just as striking. No matter how many times I watch it, I’m convinced there’s still more there I’ve yet to fully see.

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#2: The Apartment (1960)

There’s nothing quite like watching this story unfold for the first time, spoiler-free. If you’ve never seen this movie, all I will say is this: don’t read about it or look into it before watching (it’s one of those films where it’s best to know as little as possible going in), and don’t pay attention to any labeling of it as a “romantic comedy” – because it’s so much more than that. It defies categorization.

Actually, the only label that really fits is “perfect”. This is a perfect movie.

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#1: They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? (1969)

This is the most intricate movie I’ve ever seen. Its world is so complete and compelling that I’m dropped into it from the moment the opening titles start, and I’m not pulled out until the end credits roll.

No detail is wasted. The characters feel like real people you can care about. The cast is so invested, it’s incredible – no matter where or on whom you place your focus, you’ll notice things that add to the experience. The story fits together like a puzzle, and every moment is a piece that means something. Certain events are shocking, yet nothing happens that isn’t foreshadowed in some way.

From the smallest details of its perfectly-crafted world, to big ideas about society and the human condition – this movie says so much in such subtle ways.

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*Bonus*: Requiem for a Heavyweight (1956)

This one can’t be compared fairly to the others, since it’s a live teleplay. But I love it so much, I had to include it.

Out of all these masterful films, this particular story and cast are my all-time favorite. And the sets and direction make everything look surprisingly real – an especially impressive feat for an early television production.

It all works to pull you into its world so effectively that even the common pitfalls of classic live TV (slightly grainy kinescope picture, a few flubbed lines, and camerawork that occasionally beheads) aren’t really distracting. A beautiful story, a stellar cast, a complete “movie world” on a TV set – and it was all done LIVE. That’s pretty awesome.

***

So, what do you think? Please say Hi!, share your thoughts on my list, and tell me about YOUR favorite movies.

And if you’d like to visit me over at The Classic Film Connection, I’d love to connect with you there, too. As a blogging newbie, I appreciate all the support (subscribing, sharing, etc.) I can get!

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15 hours ago, Jillian Atchley said:

Interesting list. 

I quote this one because of the many cameos in it, my favorite being when SHELLEY WINTERS runs out of the crowd, bounces off of MAX VON SYDOW and declares:

"I'm cured...! I'M CURED!"   Whenever I catch that part I say to the screen..."No you're not... You're still SHELLEY WINTERS!" 

 

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16 hours ago, Jillian Atchley said:

And it’s got Jackie Gleason in a strictly dramatic role, demonstrating with very limited screen time why he deserves to be called The Great One – shooting his own pool and operating on a whole other level than the rest of the already fantastic cast.

Not just a pun: a true heavyweight.  The cover of People magazine the week he died had a cover pic and the words : "So long, Pal!"   I was very young over 30 years ago, but choked up a bit.  

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16 hours ago, Jillian Atchley said:

#8: Lilies of the Field (1963)

This is a simple story told in a straightforward way – but it’s so beautiful, it sparkles. I wouldn’t call it a “perfect” movie – yet that really doesn’t matter in light of its heart, which just shines through the screen.

And it’s too good to be considered merely a sentimental favorite…There’s a passionate energy that sets it apart – plus something else I can’t quite name. Something holy, I think.

Or is it tribal...?    I am Catholic to the core, but not religious.  I connect with Catholics because they are my tribe.   It is suggested the nuns are Catholic, but it's not clear to me.   What is clear is that they have a fundamentalist motivation and evangelical bent. 

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17 hours ago, Jillian Atchley said:

Requiem for a Heavyweight (1956)

This one can’t be compared fairly to the others, since it’s a live teleplay. But I love it so much, I had to include it.

Out of all these masterful films, this particular story and cast are my all-time favorite. And the sets and direction make everything look surprisingly real – an especially impressive feat for an early television production.

It all works to pull you into its world so effectively that even the common pitfalls of classic live TV (slightly grainy kinescope picture, a few flubbed lines, and camerawork that occasionally beheads) aren’t really distracting. A beautiful story, a stellar cast, a complete “movie world” on a TV set – and it was all done LIVE. That’s pretty awesome.

Have you seen the feature film with ANTHONY QUINN

BTW : Welcome to the board. 

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1 hour ago, Allhallowsday said:

Interesting list. 

I quote this one because of the many cameos in it, my favorite being when SHELLEY WINTERS runs out of the crowd, bounces off of MAX VON SYDOW and declares:

"I'm cured...! I'M CURED!"   Whenever I catch that part I say to the screen..."No you're not... You're still SHELLEY WINTERS!" 

 

Yeeeaaahhh…I know the cameos are a derisive, and sometimes laughable, feature. Some certainly work better than others. John Wayne LOOKS great, but his delivery is an unfortunate let down. (Confession: He’s the one that makes me giggle. 🙈) But then you’ve got magical surprises in there, like Sidney Poitier, Sal Mineo, Van Heflin, and even Ed Wynn - all of whom I find very effective. And even those who weren’t as impactful were matched to their role according to their “star image” - so you can see why they SHOULD’VE worked, even if they didn’t.

The differing looks and accents can be jarring, too. But I like that the overall effect is one of a gigantic, Hollywood-style Passion Play - like a community came together to create something bigger than themselves. It was so big that I think it got away from George Stevens to a certain extent, but the effort is pretty incredible as it is. 

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1 hour ago, Allhallowsday said:

Not just a pun: a true heavyweight.  The cover of People magazine the week he died had a cover pic and the words : "So long, Pal!"   I was very young over 30 years ago, but choked up a bit.  

🥺 Awww…❤️

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1 hour ago, Allhallowsday said:

Or is it tribal...?    I am Catholic to the core, but not religious.  I connect with Catholics because they are my tribe.   It is suggested the nuns are Catholic, but it's not clear to me.   What is clear is that they have a fundamentalist motivation and evangelical bent. 

I’ve always assumed they were Catholic, since they participate in the local Catholic services and seem to build the chapel as a home-base for the traveling priest and the Catholic community, but that may be a false assumption on my part - as I am not Catholic. I was raised as specifically and emphatically Baptist (where people tend to say “I’m a Baptist” rather than “I’m a Christian”), so I chuckle every time Homer makes a point of that. It is very important to some people. 

Maybe “special” would be a more appropriate word than “holy”. Regardless, there’s something to it. It touches my heart every time.

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48 minutes ago, Allhallowsday said:

Have you seen the feature film with ANTHONY QUINN

BTW : Welcome to the board. 

Thanks! 😊 And yes, I have.

I find both versions of Requiem fascinating to watch. It’s like exploring both sides of the same coin or two divergent paths The performances and direction are top-notch in both, and I don’t mind the different endings…necessarily. It’s just that I think the ‘62 film version resorted to some clumsy story changes in order to make the new ending work.

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2 hours ago, Jillian Atchley said:

John Wayne LOOKS great, but his delivery is an unfortunate let down. (Confession: He’s the one that makes me giggle. 🙈)

He TRULY IS.    The Son of God. 

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Jillian Atchley,

Welcome. I subscribed to your blog, The Classic Film Connection.

Your Top 10 list is commendable. Of all your Top 10 entries, only They Shoot Horses, Don't They? is in my movie library.

Regarding The Greatest Story Ever Told, my mother was actually on one of the sets during its production. A neighbor whose son wanted to be in movies was an extra in TGSET. Because his mother was working, my mother accompanied the young lad to the studio.

Since you seem to be a Jackie Gleason fan, I highly recommend checking out Soldier in the Rain, if you haven't already seen it. And of course,  Gigot.

I'm not really big on lists. But, I'll play along. This time.

My Top Ten Favorite Movies (today* and in alphabetical order)

Black Narcissus

Striking color cinematography by Jack Cardiff and Kathleen Byron's performance, for me, are the highlights in this 1947 Powell-Pressburger production. 

The Boys in the Band

The 2020 remake and adaptation of the 2018 Broadway revival of Mart Crowley's 1968 play, for me, majorly pales in comparison to the 1970 rendition directed by William Friedkin and featuring the original cast in the 1968 Off-Broadway production. Arresting characters, indelible performances, and above all, Crowley's acerbic, hilarious, and delicious, quotable dialogue elevate and immortalize this tragicomic time capsule.

Gold Diggers of 1935

The Musical is my second least-favorite genre (behind Action-Adventure flicks). But after I beheld the stunning, phenomenal "Lullaby of Broadway" vignette in this Warner Bros. classic, I became an instant fan of Busby Berkeley's 1930s musicals.

Hard Times

IMO, Charles Bronson's best movie. Although he was 53 during production, Bronson's brawny, formidable physique solidly sells his characterization of a bare-knuckle brawler who makes money engaging in pickup fights during The Great Depression. James Coburn nimbly assists as a slick, fast-talking sharpie. Dynamic, riveting fight scenes pack Walter Hill's directorial debut with a one-two punch that makes Hard Times an entertaining knockout.

Night of the Hunter

The one and only movie directed by the one and only Charles Laughton. Based on the novel by Davis Grubb. Distinguished by an unforgettable performance (alternately comedic and terrifying) by Robert Mitchum; artful imagery and cinematography by Stanley Cortez; and oneiric, Gothic storytelling by Laughton.

Out of the Past

Robert Mitchum had been kicking around Hollywood in "B" oaters and War movies for four years when his star finally ascended in this gem -- which, for me, is the definition of Film Noir. Although Mitchum had received an Oscar nomination for his performance in The Story of G.I. Joe,  he achieved full-fledged stardom after his performance in Out of the Past.  More, his hep image as (arguably) Hollywood's Coolest Cat was made and cemented with his smoky delivery of insouciant dialogue such as "Baby, I don't care." and "Build my gallows high, Baby." (the title of the source novel by Daniel Mainwaring) in this Golden Age Hollywood classic. For Noir fans, essential viewing.

The Parallax View

The second excursion into conspiracy paranoia by Alan J. Pakula. For me, the highlight in this 1974 thriller is the Parallax Corporation recruiting video. Just because you're paranoid doesn't meant they aren't out to get you.

Rio Conchos

A criminally neglected and underrated western that is also, IMO, a Film Noir tragedy. Richard Boone portrays a tortured, ex-Confederate soldier -- an homme maudit - blood-lusting for revenge against Apache Indians who slaughtered his family. Jerry Goldsmith's melancholy main title composition underscores the story's grim tone.

The Ruling Class

I love this flick! An irreverent satire on the eccentricities and incompetencies of British upper classes in general and British royalty in particular, it shifts gears in mid-story from being a puckish Ealing comedy to transforming itself into a Hammer Films-style chiller. Based on Peter Barnes' play. The entire cast is impeccable.  Favorite vignettes: the battle between two Christs (one of them electric!) and Peter O'Toole and Co. singing and doing The Varsity Drag.

The Wolfman

The Horror Film is my favorite genre and Lon Chaney, Jr. is, has been, and probably always will be my favorite actor. Consequently, The Wolfman is my favorite Horror Film. Screenwriter Curt Siodmak pretty much invented Hollywood werewolf myth and lore ("Even a man who is pure in heart and says his prayers by night, may become a wolf when the wolfbane blooms and the autumn moon is bright."). Chaney's iconic performance as the doomed, damned Lawrence Talbot is ably assisted by an exceptional cast that includes Evelyn Ankers, Bela Lugosi, Claude Rains, Warren William, Ralph Bellamy, Patric Knowles, and the exquisite Maria Ouspenskaya. Highlight: Sir John Talbot (Claude Rains) fearlessly and determinedly attacking The Wolfman, thrillingly accompanied by Hans J. Salter's dramatic score!

* Tomorrow my tastes might change.

 

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On 7/25/2021 at 6:18 PM, Allhallowsday said:

He TRULY IS.    The Son of God. 

@Allhallowsday It’s not what he says that strikes me funny - just the bored, “Can I go home now?” way he says it. This centurion is not awed; he just wants to get out of the rain. ☺️ Pat Boone’s angel is another one who is totally lost. 🙄 But to be fair to these guys, they weren’t given characters to play so much as iconic pieces of scripture to recite. How do you play a one-line centurion or a monologuing angel without sounding totally fake?

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On 7/25/2021 at 7:09 PM, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Jillian Atchley,

Welcome. I subscribed to your blog, The Classic Film Connection.

Your Top 10 list is commendable. Of all your Top 10 entries, only They Shoot Horses, Don't They? is in my movie library.

Regarding The Greatest Story Ever Told, my mother was actually on one of the sets during its production. A neighbor whose son wanted to be in movies was an extra in TGSET. Because his mother was working, my mother accompanied the young lad to the studio.

Since you seem to be a Jackie Gleason fan, I highly recommend checking out Soldier in the Rain, if you haven't already seen it. And of course,  Gigot.

I'm not really big on lists. But, I'll play along. This time.

My Top Ten Favorite Movies (today* and in alphabetical order)

Black Narcissus

Striking color cinematography by Jack Cardiff and Kathleen Byron's performance, for me, are the highlights in this 1947 Powell-Pressburger production. 

The Boys in the Band

The 2020 remake and adaptation of the 2018 Broadway revival of Mart Crowley's 1968 play, for me, majorly pales in comparison to the 1970 rendition directed by William Friedkin and featuring the original cast in the 1968 Off-Broadway production. Arresting characters, indelible performances, and above all, Crowley's acerbic, hilarious, and delicious, quotable dialogue elevate and immortalize this tragicomic time capsule.

Gold Diggers of 1935

The Musical is my second least-favorite genre (behind Action-Adventure flicks). But after I beheld the stunning, phenomenal "Lullaby of Broadway" vignette in this Warner Bros. classic, I became an instant fan of Busby Berkeley's 1930s musicals.

Hard Times

IMO, Charles Bronson's best movie. Although he was 53 during production, Bronson's brawny, formidable physique solidly sells his characterization of a bare-knuckle brawler who makes money engaging in pickup fights during The Great Depression. James Coburn nimbly assists as a slick, fast-talking sharpie. Dynamic, riveting fight scenes pack Walter Hill's directorial debut with a one-two punch that makes Hard Times an entertaining knockout.

Night of the Hunter

The one and only movie directed by the one and only Charles Laughton. Based on the novel by Davis Grubb. Distinguished by an unforgettable performance (alternately comedic and terrifying) by Robert Mitchum; artful imagery and cinematography by Stanley Cortez; and oneiric, Gothic storytelling by Laughton.

Out of the Past

Robert Mitchum had been kicking around Hollywood in "B" oaters and War movies for four years when his star finally ascended in this gem -- which, for me, is the definition of Film Noir. Although Mitchum had received an Oscar nomination for his performance in The Story of G.I. Joe,  he achieved full-fledged stardom after his performance in Out of the Past.  More, his hep image as (arguably) Hollywood's Coolest Cat was made and cemented with his smoky delivery of insouciant dialogue such as "Baby, I don't care." and "Build my gallows high, Baby." (the title of the source novel by Daniel Mainwaring) in this Golden Age Hollywood classic. For Noir fans, essential viewing.

The Parallax View

The second excursion into conspiracy paranoia by Alan J. Pakula. For me, the highlight in this 1974 thriller is the Parallax Corporation recruiting video. Just because you're paranoid doesn't meant they aren't out to get you.

Rio Conchos

A criminally neglected and underrated western that is also, IMO, a Film Noir tragedy. Richard Boone portrays a tortured, ex-Confederate soldier -- an homme maudit - blood-lusting for revenge against Apache Indians who slaughtered his family. Jerry Goldsmith's melancholy main title composition underscores the story's grim tone.

The Ruling Class

I love this flick! An irreverent satire on the eccentricities and incompetencies of British upper classes in general and British royalty in particular, it shifts gears in mid-story from being a puckish Ealing comedy to transforming itself into a Hammer Films-style chiller. Based on Peter Barnes' play. The entire cast is impeccable.  Favorite vignettes: the battle between two Christs (one of them electric!) and Peter O'Toole and Co. singing and doing The Varsity Drag.

The Wolfman

The Horror Film is my favorite genre and Lon Chaney, Jr. is, has been, and probably always will be my favorite actor. Consequently, The Wolfman is my favorite Horror Film. Screenwriter Curt Siodmak pretty much invented Hollywood werewolf myth and lore ("Even a man who is pure in heart and says his prayers by night, may become a wolf when the wolfbane blooms and the autumn moon is bright."). Chaney's iconic performance as the doomed, damned Lawrence Talbot is ably assisted by an exceptional cast that includes Evelyn Ankers, Bela Lugosi, Claude Rains, Warren William, Ralph Bellamy, Patric Knowles, and the exquisite Maria Ouspenskaya. Highlight: Sir John Talbot (Claude Rains) fearlessly and determinedly attacking The Wolfman, thrillingly accompanied by Hans J. Salter's dramatic score!

* Tomorrow my tastes might change.

 

@Eucalpytus P. Millstone Thank you so much for subscribing! 😊 

Oh, wow - how awesome it must’ve been to be on the set of such an epic film! 🤩

I haven’t seen Soldier in the Rain yet, but I have seen Gigot. 💖 I love it when an actor steps outside of his or her well-known image, and Jackie Gleason had some fantastic, nuanced turns that went way beyond Ralph Kramden. 

You’ve certainly made an intriguing list - and I’m almost ashamed to say I haven’t seen a single film from it. 🙈 But I’ve enjoyed reading it (you definitely piqued my interest!), and I will be on the lookout for these titles. If you watch any from my list, let me know - and I’ll do the same for you!

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On 7/25/2021 at 6:18 PM, Allhallowsday said:

He TRULY IS.    The Son of God. 

I have a theory why John Wayne isn't really seen until Christ is crucified in The Greatest Story Ever Told.  I wondered if there was a cut where Wayne was identified as the centurion when Christ was being whipped on his way to the cross and audience members pointed and said "look!, it's John Wayne!"  Talk about taking you out of the moment.

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5 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

I have a theory why John Wayne isn't really seen until Christ is crucified in The Greatest Story Ever Told.  I wondered if there was a cut where Wayne was identified as the centurion when Christ was being whipped on his way to the cross and audience members pointed and said "look!, it's John Wayne!"  Talk about taking you out of the moment.

@Bogie56 Very true, and very possible - considering the cut first shown to audiences isn’t available, as far as I know. (I would love to watch the uncut version, just to see Stevens’ original vision.) He was also heavily featured in some advertising, I think. (I’ve seen at least one poster where JOHN WAYNE’S FACE is definitely the focus.) I’ve thought it would’ve been better to at least see him throughout the crucifixion process, to make him more of a character - but I bet you’re right. 

While it seems to be a casting choice that presented some challenges (or maybe hinderances), I get the idea behind it. He certainly LOOKED the part. I don’t think anyone was ever more imposing. The guy was a tree!

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19 hours ago, Jillian Atchley said:

@Eucalpytus P. Millstone Thank you so much for subscribing! 😊 

Oh, wow - how awesome it must’ve been to be on the set of such an epic film! 🤩

I haven’t seen Soldier in the Rain yet, but I have seen Gigot. 💖 I love it when an actor steps outside of his or her well-known image, and Jackie Gleason had some fantastic, nuanced turns that went way beyond Ralph Kramden. 

You’ve certainly made an intriguing list - and I’m almost ashamed to say I haven’t seen a single film from it. 🙈 But I’ve enjoyed reading it (you definitely piqued my interest!), and I will be on the lookout for these titles. If you watch any from my list, let me know - and I’ll do the same for you!

Jillian Atchley,

Don't feel obligated to watch any of the movies on my list. Cinema longa, vita brevis. Or, so many movies, so little time!

Also, you like what you like and don't like what you don't like. I'd be truly amazed if there were any female Charles Bronson fans.

Another movie fave of mine is The Trip, the 1967 American International Pictures mind-blower directed by Roger Corman and written by Jack Nicholson.

Speaking of which, I seem to be on a psychedelic trip myself. Sometimes I see three pages and more than 50 responses to your My Top 10 post. Other times I see only one page and a little more than a handful of responses. Weird City!

First there is a mountain, then there is no mountain, then there is. Cue Donovan.

 

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1 hour ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Speaking of which, I seem to be on a psychedelic trip myself. Sometimes I see three pages and more than 50 responses to your My Top 10 post. Other times I see only one page and a little more than a handful of responses. Weird City!

There are two My Top 10 threads at two different forums.    That might be the reason for any psychedelic trip.

 

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4 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

Jillian Atchley,

Don't feel obligated to watch any of the movies on my list. Cinema longa, vita brevis. Or, so many movies, so little time!

Also, you like what you like and don't like what you don't like. I'd be truly amazed if there were any female Charles Bronson fans.

Another movie fave of mine is The Trip, the 1967 American International Pictures mind-blower directed by Roger Corman and written by Jack Nicholson.

Speaking of which, I seem to be on a psychedelic trip myself. Sometimes I see three pages and more than 50 responses to your My Top 10 post. Other times I see only one page and a little more than a handful of responses. Weird City!

First there is a mountain, then there is no mountain, then there is. Cue Donovan.

 

Of course. No obligation, no pressure. 🙂 “So many movies, so little time” is right! But if I happen to come across one you mentioned and it clicks in my memory, I will probably give it a try just because it’s on your list.

Funnily enough, young Charles Bronson has popped up in three films I’ve watched in the past year (The Clown, Pat & Mike, and Miss Sadie Thompson). I wouldn’t say I’m a fan (just ambivalent for now), but he’s at least on my radar. 

The mind blower is the only one you’ve mentioned so far that I’m immediately hesitant about. I don’t think that would be my thing at all. But written by Jack Nicholson plus all those big names in the cast - wow! 
 

And no, it’s not a trip - the duplicate posts are just the mishaps of a message board newbie. 🙃 I didn’t take time to read all the options until after I posted in the General forum, then I re-posted in the forum with the more specific theme. I didn’t think about how that might mess with someone’s head. 😉 Lesson learned: Stick to one forum. (Plus, unintentional lesson learned: the General forum gets more action, by far!) Sorry for the confusion.

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3 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

There are two My Top 10 threads at two different forums.    That might be the reason for any psychedelic trip.

 

Yes, the duplicate posts are just the mishaps of a message board newbie. 🙃 I didn’t take time to read all the options until after I posted in the General forum, then re-posted in the forum with the more specific theme. I didn’t think about how that might mess with someone’s head. 😉 Lesson learned: Stick to one forum. (Plus, unintentional lesson learned: the General forum gets more action, by far!) Sorry for the confusion.

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11 hours ago, Jillian Atchley said:

Yes, the duplicate posts are just the mishaps of a message board newbie. 🙃 I didn’t take time to read all the options until after I posted in the General forum, then re-posted in the forum with the more specific theme. I didn’t think about how that might mess with someone’s head. 😉 Lesson learned: Stick to one forum. (Plus, unintentional lesson learned: the General forum gets more action, by far!) Sorry for the confusion.

No problem.   Fairly common with newbies.    I like your taste in films  from the studio-era as well as you're knowledge and it is always  good to have new blood at this forum.

 

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