Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Actor-comedian Jackie Mason (1928-2021)


jakeem
 Share

Recommended Posts

Jackie Mason, the ordained rabbi-turned-stand-up comic and actor, died Saturday at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan, according to his attorney Raoul Felder. Mason had observed his 93rd birthday on June  9.

“We shall never see his like again. This was a mold that was broken ," Felder said. "We’re going to miss him.”

Felder said that Mason had been hospitalized for more than two weeks before his death,

Mason, the child of immigrants from Belarus, was born in Sheboygan, Wisconsin as Yakov Moshe Maza. The family moved to Manhattan  when the boy was 5.

See the source image

Mason made his first of 20 appearances on "The Ed Sullivan Show" in 1961. But an apparent misunderstanding between the comedian and Sullivan later in the decade led to Mason's banishment from the variety show for a time. Sullivan believed that Mason had "flipped a finger" in his direction during a telecast on Oct. 18, 1964. 

In 1987, Mason's one-man Broadway show "The World According to Me" was awarded a special Tony.  A year later, the performance was recorded for television and earned Mason a Primetime Emmy for Outstanding Writing in a Variety or Music Program.

When Rodney Dangerfield didn't return for the 1988 comedy sequel to "Caddyshack" (1980), Mason stepped in as a new character  --Jack Hartounian, a nouveau riche member of the snooty Bushwood Country Club. Directed by Allan Arkush, "Caddyshack II" -- which was not as successful as the first film -- also starred Robert Stack, Randy Quaid, Dan Aykroyd,  Dyan Cannon, Chynna Phillips, Jessica Lundy (as Jack's daughter), Dina Merrill  and Chevy Chase,

In  the fall of 1989, Mason co-starred with the British actress Lynn Redgrave in the ABC sitcom "Chicken Soup." The series, which focused on the romance between a middle-aged Jewish man (Mason) and an Irish Catholic woman (Redgrave), was canceled after 12 episodes.

See the source image

On "The Simpsons," he provided the voice of Rabbi Hyman Krustofsky, the father of TV's Krusty the Clown. In 1992, Mason won a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance in the episode "Like Father, Like Clown".

See the source image

 

FO2-YMNR_bigger.jpg

I was doing a show at CBS in 1989. Next door, Jackie Mason was doing his Chicken Soup sitcom, and I encountered him just once. I admitted to using one of his jokes on my friends when I was a teenager. He was very forgiving once I assured him it got laughs.
 

 

gwApDT26_bigger.jpg

Love and prayers for our friend Jackie. Irreverent, iconoclastic, Funny, smart, and a great American Patriot. He will be missed by so many. God Speed Jackie. Love and prayers to him and his wonderful family.
 
 
 

ocI5GlvV_bigger.jpg

SAD FAREWELL
Jackie Mason, who has died at age 93, was one of the last of the classic old school comedians. One of my favorite lines of his was, "I have enough money to last me the rest of my life unless I buy something." RIP Mr. Mason. The world is a bit less funny today.
 
Image
 
R.I.P. Jackie Mason, who made me laugh a few times, but never harder than I did reading the bio on his website.
 
Image
 
  • Thanks 5
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Funny man.

"Everybody's so crazy about the Internet. I can talk to someone in Russia! I can talk to someone in Russia! What's so great about that? You've never talked to the guy next door ... and you want to talk to Russia?"

  • Like 1
  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, jakeem said:

On "The Simpsons," he provided the voice of Rabbi Hyman Krustofsky, the father of TV's Krusty the Clown. In 1992, Mason won a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance in the episode "Like Father, Like Clown".

And was not the first time Mason's voice (or John Byner's imitation thereof) inspired an animated character:

(Back in the 70's days when Mason was still "blacklisted" from the Ed Sullivan mixup, and few children on Saturday morning had heard of Dean Martin, either.)

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, EricJ said:

Back in the 70's days when Mason was still "blacklisted" from the Ed Sullivan mixup, and few children on Saturday morning had heard of Dean Martin, either.)

Mason and Martin made quite a team on an episode of Dino's 1960s NBC variety series.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It seems hard to believe now, but there was a moment, actually a year, or more... when Jackie Mason and his one-man Broadway show THE WORLD ACCORDING TO ME (late 1980's) was the biggest thing in NYC. For a brief while this late middle-aged Borscht Belt comic was as big as Springsteen or Madonna.

I was his waiter on several occasions in the 80's and early 90's at The Russian Tea Room. Unlike many comics, who are dark and not fun to meet in person, Mr. Mason was pretty much the same in person as his stage/TV persona. Non-stop good-natured shtick and self-deprecation. 

Money and his hair were the two things that he seemed to fixate on. When customers engaged him, he would always make them laugh, while reminding them, you're getting this for free, come see the show!

I recall him coming to the restaurant on one occasion when his hair was very elaborately teased. His hairdo was so large and stiff it was almost knocking over the heavy brass samovars behind his head. He complained (jokingly) to us. One of the waiters suggested to him that he should use a different brand of hair spray., or at least use just one can at a time.

"That was good. Can I use that in the show?"

RIP Mr. Mason.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mark Steyn who writes some of the sweetest remembrances wrote this today about Jackie Mason.

"Jackie Mason, a Borscht Belter who survived and prospered decades after the Belt fell apart, died on Saturday at the age of ninety-three. He kept going almost to the end: our own Laura Rosen Cohen linked to a column of his just a couple of weeks ago. I have no doubt that his political inclinations (Republican) cost him in these last years, but, simply considered in terms of technique and stagecraft, he was a very great comedian, and, if the grimly woke panderers of contemporary stand-up don't get that, it's because they're not really in the same business at all.

I met Jackie Mason just the once, on the BBC, getting on for three decades ago now. It was the early days of Starbucks, and I was there to do a world's-slowest-coffee routine with the wonderful Bonnie Langford, West End child star, Doctor Who's perkiest sidekick, and the indestructible trouper of troupers. I can't remember much about it, except at one point Bonnie had to say "Perk you now, grind you later", which isn't the greatest of lines but she managed to imbue it with about thirty different shades of meaning.

Anyway, Jackie Mason was also on the show, and, afterwards he asked me who our writer was. I felt it would make me look like a loser to say I'd written it myself (and, worse, that Miss Langford had improved it, as is her wont), so I promised to pass on any message to the guy. "Tell him he may be on to something," growled Mason, which I took as high praise. A few years later, I opened up The Weekly Standard to find the comic genius had worked up a macchiato routine all his own.

When I mentioned that somewhere or other circa a decade back, a few readers seemed to think I was implying Mr Mason had, as someone put it, "leveraged" Bonnie's and my shtick into his. No, no, no, not at all: his routine was pure, hilarious Jackie Mason. I only brought it up because, if you've ever been on a show with full-time professional funny men, you'll know they're not the most generous of chaps: When I used to do National Review late-night sessions with Rob Long, an aside of mine that would have the audience howling would prompt from Rob an all but imperceptible tilt of the head and slight nod, as befits the writer of "Cheers". They know too much about the form - like the Pompidou Centre, the plumbing is too obvious to them. So I was thrilled that Jackie Mason took the time to say what he did - and with hindsight I have no doubt he knew Bonnie and I had no hotshot writing team, so his very artful comment was even more touching. It meant an awful lot to me back then.

He showed one other side of him that day. When comics are interviewed on TV or radio, it's often a bit disappointing: either they're doing bits from the act, or they get trapped into solemn dissections of the art. But Jackie Mason had a particular exasperation with interviewers who'd get him on the air and then bark "Say something funny" or "Tell me a joke". He had this whole riff on how that's what he does for a living, why should he give it away? If he runs into a brain surgeon at a cocktail party, he doesn't say, okay, gimme a lobotomy. Etc. I have never seen a man being funnier about refusing to be funny than on that day. Larry Gelbart (writer of "M*A*S*H", Tootsie, Sid Caesar, etc) was also on the show, and he was very serious about being funny.

I never met Jackie Mason again, although we had a brief exchange of emails a few years back. But I admired him enormously. He lived a long life, but I would have liked it if he'd gone on till 120."

"

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/25/2021 at 11:54 AM, EricJ said:

And was not the first time Mason's voice (or John Byner's imitation thereof) inspired an animated character:

(Back in the 70's days when Mason was still "blacklisted" from the Ed Sullivan mixup, and few children on Saturday morning had heard of Dean Martin, either.)

ALWAYS loved the Jewish anteater.  He also was the Jewish Robot tailor in Sleeper. 

"Drop dead!, ya wanna drop dead?" Too funny.

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...