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Classic movie lines you use in everyday conversations?


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Does anyone else regularly use lines from old movies in everyday conversations?

I have a few. One that nobody understands? Whenever I have a chance to comment about orchids, or if someone asks me if I think orchids are pretty I drag out this gem that General Sternwood said in THE BIG SLEEP (1946) (I think Chandler wrote it close to verbatim in the novel):

"Their flesh is too much like the flesh of men... their perfume has the rotten sweetness of corruption".  Needless to say, I've had occasion to say this line once every few years and nobody understands the derivation. But I persist, and I have even used the line this year (it drew the usual blank response).

A line that has worked better? From STATE FAIR (1962) , Bobby Darin invites Pamela Tiffin out on a date by saying, "Let's cut up some steaks and have some laughs".  I love to eat and have fun, who doesn't? Much better success rate with this line! 

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1 hour ago, Herman Bricks said:

Does anyone else regularly use lines from old movies in everyday conversations?

I have a few. One that nobody understands? Whenever I have a chance to comment about orchids, or if someone asks me if I think orchids are pretty I drag out this gem that General Sternwood said in THE BIG SLEEP (1946) (I think Chandler wrote it close to verbatim in the novel):

"Their flesh is too much like the flesh of men... their perfume has the rotten sweetness of corruption".  Needless to say, I've had occasion to say this line once every few years and nobody understands the derivation. But I persist, and I have even used the line this year (it drew the usual blank response).

A line that has worked better? From STATE FAIR (1962) , Bobby Darin invites Pamela Tiffin out on a date by saying, "Let's cut up some steaks and have some laughs".  I love to eat and have fun, who doesn't? Much better success rate with this line! 

"I'll Be Hanged, by a SheepSkin .." ...     Around the World In Eighty Days.

 

(Not entirely sure.. how classic that is. But there Ya Go. Lol)

 

I'll Add Additional (Completely Weird, Random) Ones if and/or when They Strike.

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9 hours ago, Aritosthenes said:

"I'll Be Hanged, by a SheepSkin .." ...   

Wonder what's meant by that?

Hanged by the skin of an actual SHEEP?

or...

By the sheepskin in his WALLET?  ;) 

Sepiatone

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2 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Wonder what's meant by that?

Hanged by the skin of an actual SHEEP?

or...

By the sheepskin in his WALLET?  ;) 

Sepiatone

Ive Always Took/Interpreted it to mean (near) Complete, Total Stupefication and or Otherwise (Confounding) Beffuddlement ..

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Sheepskin used to be slang for a college diploma. It took him seven years but Norbert finally earned his

sheepskin. I can't think of any lines I use from the studio era films, but I do say you ***********  idiot

every once in a while. 

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At the jazz guitar forum I just used my saying (listed under my avatar), of:   Nothing is as bad as something not-so-bad.

Eric  Clapton was being discussed (for his stance on Covid-19 and not playing in any venue that required one to be vaccinated),  and someone posted that Eric's playing was boring.

Well someone else posted that the album Crossroad "ain't that boring".      I posted back:  not much of a complement.   That album is only somewhat boring and then posted that what he wrote was similar to saying something is  not-so-bad.

(and for the record,  I do find Clapton to be somewhat boring since he plays mostly just the blues and the blues is generally boring).

 

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One of my favs is Bob Mitchum's best line from Out of the Past: "I don't want to die either, but if I have to I'm going to the last one!". And indeed, he is the last one. Hard to work this one into 'normal conversation' but I always look for openings.

Another one from Jan Sterling's character in Ace in the Hole: "I never go to church to pray. Kneeling bags my stockings" (not that I ever wear stockings, but I'll marry any woman who uses this line in my presence). Or how about her smack down of Kirk Douglas' character: "I've met some hard boiled eggs in my time, but you're 20 minutes".

John Lennon's classic dying words from How I Won the War: "Fought for three reasons. Can't remember what they were ......"

And of course one of the best lines from a mostly forgotten 30's western: "Smile whenever you call me a low down, two-faced lying varmint!".  Response: "Why, I always smile when someone's poking a gun into my belly"

Why can't today's scriptwriters carve out lines like that? Answer: Because they're only interested in making comic book movies these days.

Here's another one: "Somehow I can't recall ever having had amnesia".

Okay, full confession, that's one of my own quips and doesn't come from any movie that I know of, but dammit, it should be in there somewhere!

 

 

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

 

(and for the record,  I do find Clapton to be somewhat boring since he plays mostly just the blues and the blues is generally boring).

 

So, I take it you didn't watch that documentary on Buddy Guy last night on PBS' American Masters series, eh James?

(...THAT "wasn't so boring", anyway...ahem...well, I liked it, anyway)

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Okay, and now HERE'S one I seem to be using A LOT lately when I run into someone who seems cocksure that their opinion about something is unshakebly "the truth", BUT which I know actually has no basis in any facts...

BogartScrewy.gif

(...and yep, I even say it with a little lisp just like this guy up there did)

LOL

;)

 

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13 minutes ago, Dargo said:

So, I take it you didn't watch that documentary on Buddy Guy last night on PBS' American Masters series, eh James?

(...THAT "wasn't so boring", anyway...ahem...well, I liked it, anyway)

I have seen Buddy Guy;  he is one of the few blues guitarist,  along with Stevie Ray Vaughan,  that I find interesting due to their technique.

Clapton has a great sound (tone),  but I just don't find his playing that interesting. 

I like music that uses more than the standard blue chord changes of I\IV\V.

   

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1 minute ago, Dargo said:

Okay, and now HERE'S one I seem to be using A LOT lately when I run into someone who seems cocksure that their opinion about something in unshakebly "the truth", BUT which I know actually has no basis in any facts...

BogartScrewy.gif

(...and yep, I even say it with a little lisp just like the guy up there did)

LOL

 

What film is that from?   All Through the Night would be  my guess (and he's  talking to Conrad Veidt?).

 

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2 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

What film is that from?   All Through the Night would be  my guess (and he's  talking to Conrad Veidt?).

 

Yep, I think you're right about this, James.

Actually though, this really was just a case of me stumbling across that gif and then thinking of some smart*** comment to add to it while I was posting it here, and because OF COURSE I don't really tell people that they're "screwy" when they try to tell me somethin' I know for a FACT isn't true.

(...NOOOO, what I tell 'em is that I think they're full of CRAP!)  ;)

LOL 

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5 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I do find Clapton to be somewhat boring since he plays mostly just the blues and the blues is generally boring).

Something of a controversial positioning statement from someone so in love with a genre of music that MANY, MANY, MANY people find boring! Not saying me, I've delved into both jazz and blues during the history of the existence of iTunes (still in existence, right?). I'm just sayin' ... Jazz and blues have common roots, I think. In the risk of sounding extremely overly simplistic, I think very early jazz was mostly blues with horns.

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"It's alive! It's alive!" (usually said to gently tease someone who has finally woken up, much later than usual)

"I am a shimmering, glowing star in the cinema firma-mint(usually said with self-mockery, in recognition of some tiny, insignificant achievement).  Basically a variation of the Stuart Smalley mantra, "I'm good enough, I'm smart enough, and goshdarnit, people like me!"

"I dunno nothin' 'bout birthin' babies, Miss Scarlett!" (to indicate my lack of knowledge or skill in some particular area).  But usually adapted to whatever the situation is ("I dunno nothin' 'bout cookin' Brussels sprouts, Miss Scarlett!", etc.)  Admittedly, nowadays I sometimes think twice about referencing/imitating this particular character.

The two my Mom seems to use most often are "Practically perfect in every way" (again, usually used ironically, or to acknowledge her own sometimes excessive attention to detail) and, for no apparent reason, "He...vuz...my...BOYFRIEND!!" (always delivered with gusto)

 

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Another one that I use... when someone tells me something that they think is disturbing that I already knew about or suspected.... (me in Claude Rains' voice): "I'm shocked, I'm shocked!"

giphy.gif

 

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I sometimes say "Yeah, yeah", Lee Marvin-style when called upon to do something about an unpleasant but not unexpected situation, like when he's told the Dirty Dozen are acting up again.

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13 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

 Jazz and blues have common roots, 

And some would say there wouldn't BE jazz if not for the blues. And supreme jazz alto sax man CHARLIE PARKER once said he judges how good a jazz musician is by how well he plays the blues.  ;) 

19 hours ago, Vautrin said:

 I do say you ***********  idiot every once in a while. 

My asterisk is a bit rusty.  Just what IS it you say every once in a while?  ;) 

Sepiatone

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13 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Something of a controversial positioning statement from someone so in love with a genre of music that MANY, MANY, MANY people find boring! Not saying me, I've delved into both jazz and blues during the history of the existence of iTunes (still in existence, right?). I'm just sayin' ... Jazz and blues have common roots, I think. In the risk of sounding extremely overly simplistic, I think very early jazz was mostly blues with horns.

Viewing the blues harmonic progression (I7\IV7\V7) as "boring"  is a fairly standard position of jazz musicians based on the jazz forum I go to..      Also are you sure others find jazz "boring"?    What I have been told is that many find it too complex \ busy \ lacking melody \ consistency (repetition) \ ,  but not "boring".   (or equate being non-danceable with "boring").    

Note:  the blues progression in the key of E  would be E7, A7,  G7:  the same 3 chords used for the entire song.    The solo would be based on the E blues scale for the entire song.   I.e. the same key of E for the entire song. 

Yes,  early jazz was rooted in that standard blues harmonic progression,   but jazz involved,  even jazz-blues by adding extensions and alternate chords,  and those different scales \ scale tone \ notes (other than just the blues scale).     The same harmonic progression is NOT repeated the entire song,  bar after bar after bar. 

This very limited,  simplistic  blues harmonic progression is what that I find "boring" as a listener but really so as a musician.    

Jazz uses harmonic progressions based on classical music;   E.g.  diminished chords,  half-diminished chords,  multiple key changes,   etc....

  Note that I don't find someone like Stevie Ray Vaughan "boring" even those he admits he only plays the blues scale and the minor pentatonic scale (which is only 5 notes).

This is because Vaughan has such great technique.   I.e.  he can do more with those 5 notes than I can with all 12.     

 

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I appreciate the clarification. I won't get into a semantics argument about what "boring" means. I'm quite sure I've heard my associates use that term to describe jazz on multiple occasions, but what they find boring clearly isn't the same thing you do. You rankled me a bit by not initially  stating "I think is blues is boring" or "I find blues boring" but instead "blues is generally boring", as if that is all there was to say about the topic. But your follow-up post has much more nuance. I think there's value in all sorts of musical styles.

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14 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

I appreciate the clarification. I won't get into a semantics argument about what "boring" means. I'm quite sure I've heard my associates use that term to describe jazz on multiple occasions, but what they find boring clearly isn't the same thing you do. You rankled me a bit by not initially  stating "I think is blues is boring" or "I find blues boring" but instead "blues is generally boring", as if that is all there was to say about the topic. But your follow-up post has much more nuance. I think there's value in all sorts of musical styles.

Yea, I'm sure there are many different POV of  what "boring" means.     For me it is mostly about repetition.     Most rock\pop music is mostly repetition in structure;   E.g. Take any 4 minute song - how many of the passages\sections are musically different (not lyrically)?   Typically only 2,  sometimes 3.     George Martin knew this which is why he would record one section and then use that over and over instead of recording the entire song in one take;  E.g. use the best recorded "A" section,  and the best recorded "B" section,  splice them into an A\A\B\A song (sometimes adding an intro or ending).     Now I don't find The Beatles "boring" since the songs are so short.

When one improvises if the harmonic progression is very repetitive (same 3 chords),  that limits the note choices and one ends up repeating themselves unless  that have super technique  (i.e. the ability to milk those same notes to keep it interesting \ different).

Note that even Clapton admitted that; E.g. the Live at Fillmore album with that very long version of Crossroads;    He said he would just play the same thing over and over and still the audience  loved it.      (since I believe most people favor repetition).

 

 

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zach-braff-reacts-to-shia-labeouf-retire

Also:

"I have given a NAME to my pain (loads gun)..." - Batman (1989)

"The press grabbed the wrong end of the stick, and started to beat about the bush with it." - The Rutles (1978)

"...'I think it might be fun to run a newspaper'??" - Citizen Kane (1941)  (Ie., whenever a clearly inexperienced celebrity wants to use his/her money to write, direct, or run for president)

 

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