Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Classic movie hidden gems


Toto
 Share

Recommended Posts

Recently, I tried a movie "Went the Day Well?" and it was a real surprise!  This is a British film made in 1942 which has a "what-if?" story about sadistic Nazi's invading a small British village and has a docu-drama feel.  The possibility of a real German invasion was on the minds of the British when this film was made and the story involves Nazi brutality but the war was very real.

I'd love to hear about any classic movie hidden gems that you know of.  I found "Went the Day Well?"  on Netflix DVD.  I don't know if TCM shows this movie.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Toto said:

Recently, I tried a movie "Went the Day Well?" and it was a real surprise!  This is a British film made in 1942 which has a "what-if?" story about sadistic Nazi's invading a small British village and has a docu-drama feel.  The possibility of a real German invasion was on the minds of the British when this film was made and the story involves Nazi brutality but the war was very real.

I'd love to hear about any classic movie hidden gems that you know of.  I found "Went the Day Well?"  on Netflix DVD.  I don't know if TCM shows this movie.

😑

     This is a DANGEROUS /LETHAL Topic to place on the Counter right in front of my face.

 

     Akin to giving a little tyke a box of crayons and a bowl of honey and letting them run amok in an art museum...

_

The Auto themed Genevieve is .. LOVELY.

 Im a HUGE Fan of the Honeymoon Machine (LOVE MaQueen's Comedic Timing in it)

Ice Cold In Alex..   Cant Say Enough Superlatives About this one.   Mills and Syms GLISTEN "On" the Sand of the Storytelling, Direction, and Script.   While Andrews (Harry) and Anthony Quale are EXCEPTIONAL AsUsual.

(Ice Cold is on tubi, at moment for anyone interested.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Toto said:

Recently, I tried a movie "Went the Day Well?" and it was a real surprise!  This is a British film made in 1942 which has a "what-if?" story about sadistic Nazi's invading a small British village and has a docu-drama feel.  The possibility of a real German invasion was on the minds of the British when this film was made and the story involves Nazi brutality but the war was very real.

I'd love to hear about any classic movie hidden gems that you know of.  I found "Went the Day Well?"  on Netflix DVD.  I don't know if TCM shows this movie.

While Thoroughly Uncertain as to Their Respective "Classic" Pedigree. And While Certainly Subjective: Largo Winch, Largo Winch II: Burma Conspiracy, Slalom, I Smile Back, Let the Sunshine In, Broken Circle Breakdown, Okja, Dreamland (Madam Margot Robbie in a the Best Role of Her Life), Meadowland, A Hologram For the King, and the Survivalist are (anywhere from) Exceptional - Exquisite - Transcendental

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Toto said:

Recently, I tried a movie "Went the Day Well?" and it was a real surprise!  This is a British film made in 1942 which has a "what-if?" story about sadistic Nazi's invading a small British village and has a docu-drama feel.  The possibility of a real German invasion was on the minds of the British when this film was made and the story involves Nazi brutality but the war was very real.

I'd love to hear about any classic movie hidden gems that you know of.  I found "Went the Day Well?"  on Netflix DVD.  I don't know if TCM shows this movie.

The Whistlers and (A) Ghost Story are also EXQUISITE ..

🎨🎨🌈

 

 

 

        🤦‍♀️🤦‍♂️🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️😑

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Toto said:

I don't know if TCM shows this movie.

It's been shown a couple of times, though not recently.  A movie with a similar invasion theme, combining both humor, intrigue, suspense and action is I See a Dark Stranger (1946), starring Deborah Kerr and Trevor Howard.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

47 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

It's been shown a couple of times, though not recently.  A movie with a similar invasion theme, combining both humor, intrigue, suspense and action is I See a Dark Stranger (1946), starring Deborah Kerr and Trevor Howard.

And speaking of "Deborah Kerr" and movies about "invasions"...

Even after now probably ten years since I first happened upon the following film shown on TCM and one that I hadn't at all been familiar with prior to watching it...

865d7635-570a-4850-8812-dfab8227579f_1.4

...I still remember being quite impressed with it and it haunting my thoughts for days afterward.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A movie I like which seems to have been neglected for years but has shown up a few times recently on TCM is Winter Meeting (1948), one of the Bette Davis films which helped ease her out of Warner Brothers after it lost money. It's not really a success; it's talky and didactic and slowly paced. But I think the pace helped bring out Bette's more thoughtful, even-tempered side, which was only seen occasionally in films like Now Voyager and Old Acquaintance. She plays a poet with a modest reputation who's introduced by an older male friend to a naval hero at a dinner party and the film centers on that relationship. The "hero" (Jim Davis) is part of the problem, being too stiff and solemn as an actor. He's a Catholic and strongly drawn to the priesthood and that dynamic accounts for a lot of the "talky" part. Bette later told a biographer that outside pressure from religious sources precluded the kind of debate about religious issues which had drawn her to the book and the character in the first place and that she herself was disappointed in the movie. Anyway, a relationship which interested me equally was with her older gentleman friend, played by John Hoyt, which kicks off the movie. They have a wonderfully easy rapport and aren't above needling each other to make a point. Today we'd see him as a "gay best friend" and I'm curious to know whether that was spelled out more in the book. Regardless, it makes for a charming first impression of Bette and it's what cemented my regard for this movie, in spite of some of the dreariness in the middle. Bette is rightly acclaimed for some of her more explosive characters, but I love seeing her intelligence and poise come out in a film like Winter Meeting

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

JOHN HOYT must've been made up to look 'older'; he was only 2½ years older than Bette Davis (October 1905 versus April 1908).

I dunno, Mr.G. 

John Hoyt was one of those actors who looked 50 from the time he broke into the movies. And actually, he didn't break into the movies until the age of 41 in the 1946 WWII-themed Alan Ladd vehicle, O.S.S.

Here's a still from that film, and he pretty much looks like I've always remembered him looking...

s-l300.jpg

(...btw, I've always wondered if the look of the Fearless Leader character in the Rocky and Bullwinkle Show might have been fashioned after him)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Everyone has their own opinion of what makes a 'hidden gem'; I'll offer up a small number of 1930s nuggets I like well enough to watch when they pop up on TCM.  They are all in B&W and short so they don't wear out their welcome.

UNION DEPOT (1932)  68m.  All kinds of characters and plots criss-cross at the train station!  There is a lot of movie packed into these 68 minutes!

CARNIVAL BOAT (1931)  62m.  Has a good cast.  The plot doesn't actually have much to do with the 'carnival boat' of the title.  It's mostly about logging and hauling the logs.  More fun than I thought it would be.  

HAUNTED GOLD (1932)  58m.  Not bad for a quickie Warner western.  Despite some racist-type elements at least Blue Washington receives a credit because he is in a lot of the movie.  And his employer, John Wayne, trusts Blue enough to send him back to the ranch alone to get some money.   → Robert Ryan didn't trust Harry Belafonte that much in ODDS AGAINST TOMORROW!

RANGE FEUD (1931)  64m.  Buck Jones, John Wayne, Susan Fleming.  John Wayne didn't kill nobody!  He wuz framed by insidious baddies!  (Well, maybe I'm overstating things a bit . . . ).  😜

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

UNION DEPOT (1932)  68m.  All kinds of characters and plots criss-cross at the train station!  There is a lot of movie packed into these 68 minutes!

CARNIVAL BOAT (1931)  62m.  Has a good cast.  The plot doesn't actually have much to do with the 'carnival boat' of the title.  It's mostly about logging and hauling the logs.  More fun than I thought it would be.  

Two good ones.  The first with Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. and Joan Blondell.  The second with William Boyd and Ginger Rogers.

 

Sporting Blood (1931).  Madge Evans, Clark Gable.  The saga of thoroughbred Tommy Boy, born in a rain puddle, and his various owners as he evolves into a a champion stakes horse.

 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Duffy (1968).  James Coburn, Susannah York, James Mason, James Fox, John Alderton.  Stefane, lady friend and brother hatch a plan to rob their rich father of several million pounds being transported on his yacht in the Med. They travel from London to Tangiers to recruit Duffy, a weathered smuggler and con-artist.

Lots of fun.  Lots of things to like, including Mr. Coburn at his coolest, Miss York at her slinkiest and sylphiest, the wildest house ever in a movie, super score by Ernie Freeman, and a killer song sung by Lou Rawls:

 

Don't know why it's not a standard.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/30/2021 at 1:05 PM, Mr. Gorman said:

 

HAUNTED GOLD (1932)  58m.  Not bad for a quickie Warner western.  Despite some racist-type elements at least Blue Washington receives a credit because he is in a lot of the movie.  And his employer, John Wayne, trusts Blue enough to send him back to the ranch alone to get some money.   → Robert Ryan didn't trust Harry Belafonte that much in ODDS AGAINST TOMORROW!

 

So, sort of sounds like a prototype of the relationship between the Wayne-Tom Doniphan and the Strode-Pompey characters which took place three decades later, eh Mr.G?

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Two where a wounded rogue is taken in by credulous family.  Romance ensues.

Hide-Out (1934).  Robert Montgomery, Maureen O'Sullivan.  A gangster's playboy flunky  flees the Big City after being shot by police and finds refuge in a rural farmer's house.  His pretty teacher daughter nurses him.  Romance ensues.  Distinguished only by the banter between the two principles, the rest of the movie is inoffensive, even the presence of a young Mickey Rooney.

Angel and the Badman (1947).  John Wayne, Gail Russell.  A wounded rustler and all-purpose badman falls in with a Quaker family.  Their pretty daughter nurses him.  Romance ensues.  Really exceptional Western--or anti-Western, as it ends without the customary shoot-out.  But again, ultimately worthy because of the Wayne/Russell banter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

Angel and the Badman (1947).  John Wayne, Gail Russell.  A wounded rustler and all-purpose badman falls in with a Quaker family.  Their pretty daughter nurses him.  Romance ensues.  Really exceptional Western--or anti-Western, as it ends without the customary shoot-out.  But again, ultimately worthy because of the Wayne/Russell banter.

Certainly sounds like Witness - which, as I recall, does end with a shootout - was a modern spin on this film.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...