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♠ Old Golf Tournaments as Older Movies ♠


Mr. Gorman
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I noted there's a poster named 'Hogmanman1' and it reminded me of something . . . in March 2018 "The MASTERS" tournament uploaded all the final round broadcasts from 1968-through the Present Day.  Most of them were complete, but not all.  To wit:  The original color videotape master was mostly 'wiped' for the 1972 telecast (only 55 minutes extant) and the '73 Masters has only 22 minutes left of the original 2-hour broadcast.  However, the •focus• of this thread is the 1968, 1969 and 1971 Masters tournament uploads. 

CBS first televised the Masters in 1956 from what I've read, but the 1956-67 CBS broadcasts were not uploaded with the others.  I don't know why; I believe CBS was contractually obligated to make a copy of each broadcast . . . beats me why the '56-'67 final rounds weren't uploaded, but they were not.   

By 1968 CBS was televising their Masters broadcasts in color on videotape, but because videotape was expensive I reckon The •Eye• decided to point a black-and-white camera at the original color broadcast and preserve the telecast that way instead of saving the videotape color master so they could re-use the videotape.  That was done for the '68, '69 and '71.  The 1970 Masters broadcast was different in that it was preserved on a color kinescope instead of black-and-white.  → I can't figure why the '71 wasn't archivally recorded by a color camera instead of a B&W . . . but it wasn't.  🤔

Because the uploads for the '68, '69 and '71 Masters Tournaments were all uploaded from unrestored black-and-white kinescopes they look like 1930s movies.  Like they are 'sports documentaries' or 'Sports Movies' instead of a real event being played out in real-time.  → When Canadian golfer George Knudson is putting for a birdie on the 18th Hole in 1969 there's a •POP• so loud it sounds like someone was playing tennis in the background and returning a serve!   

Think of the way unrestored '30s movies looked on your old-time television and this is what these 3 broadcasts look like.  Hisses, pops and scratches galore!  They don't look like real golf tournaments being played 'Live' at the time. 

So if you're reading this and you're any kind of golf fan it's really a lot of fun to watch these old Masters broadcasts on YouTube.  Here's a short summary of each broadcast:

1968 - Continuous putting rule in effect.  This is the tournament where Roberto de Vicenzo had scorecard trouble.  Runs 1 hour 18 minutes.  CBS only allotted 90 minutes of Sunday Masters coverage for their broadcast window in '68. 

1969 - I ♥ the ending to the '69 Masters.  Continuous putting rule still in effect.  It's very noticeable on this broadcast.  You see players 'putting out' only because they HAD to instead of marking their balls and waiting.  I think CBS was only using six cameras at the time and at least 1 of these cameras was mounted on a golf cart; Tom Weiskopf sent his tee shot on the 17th hole into said golf cart with the camera mounted on it.  He got a free •drop•.  :)  You also see a cool Pontiac station wagon when Charles Coody hooks his tee shot way left on the 18th into the practice area.  Coody is looking over his 2nd shot when the Pontiac wagon comes into view.    Runs 1 hr 25 minutes.  CBS still only allotting 90 minutes of coverage time.  The small number of commercials seen during the broadcast are not seen on these uploads, btw.   NOTE:  George Archer's 4th shot at the Par-5 15th took a set of brass balls to execute!  I've never seen anyone else do what he did after he went in the water on his 2nd shot.  His playing partner, Tom Weiskopf, never forgot Archer's chip. 

1971- The continuous putting rule had been eliminated on TOUR in 1970 so you don't see any players 'putting out' like they did in '69 and '68.  CBS didn't begin allotting 2 hours to their final round broadcast window until 1973, if I'm not mistaken.  The reason this upload runs 1 hour 49 minutes is because, according to Ray Scott, a hockey game CBS was showing ended early so Masters viewers got ♦bonus♦ coverage in '71!  Yowza!  → All the hisses and scratches you could possibly want -and- with bonus coverage, too.   

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Canadian golf fans reading this might like to watch the 1969 tournament as Canada's "King of Swing" GEORGE KNUDSON cast his lot into the chase for the Green Coat.  → Back then, both the announcers and Masters staff were as likely to call what is now exclusively referred to as the "Green Jacket" the 'Green Coat' as well.  

George Knudson's swing had been called "more Hogan than Hogan", but he didn't win more because of a frequently balky putter.   

To sum up:  If you like a golf even a little bit you couple that with enjoying old movies and watching those three particular old Masters telecasts gives one a feeling of watching an unrestored 1930s sports movie.  Kind of unique, I think.    

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The Master's remains my favorite. Oh, those wonderful hilly greens. I may have a look at some those "movie" renewals. I'm old enough to remember them on TV. The earliest recollection is Cary Middlecoff just off the 18th green, needing to hole for a tie. He missed. Art Wall Jr birdy-ing five out of the last six to win. Arnie's six-foot putt to win, arm in the air and throwing the ball in the crowd. Then Arnie's double bogey on 18 to give the title to Gary Player in the clubhouse, hugging his wife. Larry Mize. The tribulations of Greg Norman. I don't think he ever won one, but close. I had just attended a Yankee game on the Sunday that Jack won his last, 1986. There was a bar up the street from the stadium where oldster drank and reminisced. The 50s, Mantle, Berra, Ford, etcs, fun to talk to them because I knew them all, at least from television. They had TV and there was Jack.  I am so old now I have lost track of the players. This last Master's I hardly knew anybody. You see, I haven't paying attention these last number of years. (Nothing to do with the demise of Tiger) When Lefty won the PGA this year, it made me feel young. Hey, I remember that guy.. Good fil. So maybe going back to your "movie" tournaments will draw a rise. Great post, you are a true fan of golf. Thanks.

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If you watch any and/or all of the uploads you'll no doubt note the small 'faces' on the woods the players were using at the time.  It took a sufficient amount of skill to hit those woods 'between the screws' as small as the faces were.  And those putters!  You get a number of close-ups of the various old-time putters the players in contention were wielding.     

When Phil won the PGA he used a blade putter.   

TRIVIA ♦NUGGET♦:   When 'The Masters' uploaded all those final round broadcasts on March 14, 2018 I couldn't help but wonder if BOBBY MITCHELL knew about it and was able to watch it.  Even tho the '72 broadcast had only 55 minutes left when the upload starts the first player you see is Bobby Mitchell hitting his 2nd shot into the 18th.  Mitchell died six days later on March 20, 2018.  He was 75.  Jim Jamieson also gets some air time on the shortened '72 broadcast.  And he passed on in December of 2018, also at 75.  Both of these guys were only in their late 20s when the 1972 Masters was played.  A reminder of just how quickly time passes.

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11 hours ago, laffite said:

The Master's remains my favorite. Oh, those wonderful hilly greens. 

Those are known as "Maxwell rolls", named for Perry Maxwell, a banker who became a golf course architect later in life.  He redesigned part of Augusta National back in the 1930s, and some of those features still remain.  He was from my hometown, and he designed his first course for the local country club.

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  • 2 months later...

Less than 2 weeks ago a YouTube poster named 'Conrad Nagel' uploaded an hour's worth of NBC coverage of the 1963 U.S. Open from The Country Club in Brookline, Mass.  The black-and-white Masters kinescopes look old, but this footage looks downright pre-historic.  It's a lot of fun to watch.  :) 

→ It's just like watching a 60-minute '30s movie whose negative someone rescued from a basement just in time or the film would fall apart. 

The 1963 U.S. Open had the golfers who made the cut still playing 36 holes in the final round . . . so it was a very long day. 

The first bits of grainy, hissy footage we see is JIMMY CLARK (1921-2010) and PAUL HARNEY (1929-2011) on the 17th Green.  Harney was right in the thick of the tournament at +9; he had a par putt on the 18th that turned out to be very important -- although he could not have known just how important it was at the time he struck it.  His playing partner, Jimmy Clark, was +27 (!) for the tournament thru 70 holes . . . but he still got some TV time!  I've heard of a LOT of golfers, but I'd never heard of Jimmy Clark before.  I had to look him up.  Anyway, Clark caught his tee shot off the 18th on the 'toe' of the club and hooked it into the rough.  He then took a wood from the rough but still came up far short of the green.  The 18th Hole was under 400 yards but it was very windy that day and played havoc with the golfers and their scorecards.  The scores were very ^high^.  I'm sure the players were exhausted. 

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Sorry I missed this first time around.  Thanks Mr. Gorman for some more information.  My parents were devoted golfers, though I only played some when I was younger.  But I do like to watch the game on TV.  Sadly, in my opinion, the network broadcasts these past few years have become increasingly hard to watch -- seems they place more emphasis on the on-air talent than showing great shots from around the course.  Funny, it's one of the few sports where the course is huge and there is continuous action going on for almost all the tournament, but if a player isn't the leader, the at-home viewer sees very little of the overall play.

That's why I like to see the footage of the older tournaments with the legends of the game really making shots!  Thanks posting all this great tuff!  

And I'll bet if we could pinpoint that "Locationstate  of GA" a bit, we'll find Mr.Gorman comfortably housed just off the 13th tee -- with no-one back there to bother him and letting enjoy Sunday at the Masters in reverential solitude.

 

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When we purchased our 1st HD television set in 2004 there were very few High Definition shows on the air back then.  The Masters was one of those very few.

It was just drop dead gorgeous to view this back then.   My wife and I researched the best HD television for the money in 2004.  We settled on the Sony KV-34HS510 34", 201 lb, CRT television set.

It was the 2nd best TV that Sony produced.  The 'Best One' was the Sony KV-34XBR910 34", 199lb, CRT.  Both TV sets had Subwoofers and sounded as good as a Sound Bar.  My KV-34HS510 gave us many years of wonderful viewing and I sold it last November so we could 'upgrade' to a QLED.  This was so we could get more features like APPS (Netflix, Amazon Prime, etc).  We went for a year withOUT TCM  because Comcast did that bit where we had to add the Sports Package to continue with TCM.  I finally went down to a Comcast store to add the package and to get TCM and I found out we needed more modern equipment.  So I purchased a Top of the Line Samsung QLED.

Anyways, watching the Masters in HD is wonderful.  Back in 2004 it was like Night & Day from 480i to true High Definition.  All sorts of Friends & Family were coming over to our home to 'see' what HD looked like outside of a store and to see it as it looks in a home.  It was funny how many people would say how BIG our screen was then.  34 inches.   For the last few years my kids and friends would keep telling me to get a new TV set since our Sony 34" was so small now.  LOL   

I miss the 'Older Days' when Pat Summerall and Ken Venturi would announce the Masters.  It always was broadcast (and still is today) after the NCAA March Madness Basketball Tournament. 

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Brian in NH:  When you watch the really old telecasts you don't see anywhere near the amount of players and shots that you see now; for example, when you view the '69 Masters telecast you see only 7 players in the 85-minute upload.  Lionel Hebert was on the leaderboard the entire telecast and you didn't see him once!  You saw Jack Nicklaus hit one shot -- out of a fairway bunker at the 18th -- and that was it. 

The other 6 players you see were the golfers in the last 3 groups; Lionel Hebert was in the 4th-to-last group, btw.  

→ However, what you don't hear back then are announcers, color commentators, on-course reporters and anyone else all talking /over/ one another frequently to get their voices heard on-air.  That stuff gets old in a hurry, but it's a frequent occurrence on modern golf telecasts.  

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Thanks, Mr. Gorman.  I thought as I was writing that beef of mine that I probably had it all wrong.  Outside of the major tournaments, I don't watch network golf coverage anymore -- for the reasons you mention.  I do watch rounds on the Golf Channel as it tends to focus more on the game  and on the various tours and college play.  Sometimes some very interesting things going on.  

But I am sure you have it right about the older telecasts.  Limited number of cameras to cover everything, perhaps?  And way back,  golf was just one of many of all those "lesser" sports that still managed to get coverage on tv.  ABC's Wide World of Sports had so many different kinds of competitions -- remember barrel jumping on ice?  It just seems that when I was growing up, the entertainment  and sports world understood that there was a vast audience that had limited access to events, so the networks made an effort to offer a surprising variety of choices.  Wide and probably a little on the shallow side, but enough stuff to let the world know there were people engaged in all sorts of fun things on any given weekend.  

OLDDOOD, thanks for remembering Pat Summerall and Ken Venturi. Both all-time favorites and terrific announcers for the game.   And it sounds like we're all coming to your house for the next Sunday at the Masters.  I'll bring the pimiento cheese sandwiches.  Glad to hear you have such a wonderful time with the images you get now.  

By the way, my wife puts our name in for the Masters Lottery each year.  One of these days we'll end up with tickets, for sure!  

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Occasionally, GOLF Channel will show old tournaments. However they don't go back very far. I've also seen some of the old Shell's Wonderful World of Golf  matches. They were great with The Squire, Gene Sarazen, as narrator. I wish more of the older tournaments were more readily available. I'd love to see some of Hogan's victories as well as Seve Ballesteros's wins in the early 80s. 

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5 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

Occasionally, GOLF Channel will show old tournaments. However they don't go back very far. I've also seen some of the old Shell's Wonderful World of Golf  matches. They were great with The Squire, Gene Sarazen, as narrator. I wish more of the older tournaments were more readily available. I'd love to see some of Hogan's victories as well as Seve Ballesteros's wins in the early 80s. 

I seem to remember in the old days (before the rise of cable sports), most golf was on ABC or CBS.  NBC/Universal owns the Golf Channel, so they may not have a lot of content available to them.  Just a guess...

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I only wish more of the older PGA CHAMPIONSHIP final rounds could be found and uploaded to watch.  Whoever this 'Conrad Nagel' fella is on YouTube, he seems to be very busy compiling old broadcasts of a slew of U.S. Opens and a some PGA Championships.  Even some British Opens, too. 

There's also a few other folks who have uploaded 'ESPN Classic' broadcasts to YouTube so you can see replays of the 1966 U.S. Open where Arnold blew a 5-shot lead with 4 holes to play and then the '67 U.S. Open where Jack Nicklaus played an excellent final round to win by four over Arnie -- who played well but could not keep up with Jack that Sunday.  Arnie had a 69, but Jack had a 65. 

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