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I wish that when the people that pick these Burton movies had included one of his best like BECKETT instead of an ensemble movie like The Longest Day in which Burton for about 20 minutes! What is wrong with programmers at TCM?

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Cheap way to fill up space (Longest Day) and I agree. You'll find this a lot in SOTM picks. I remember one year on Lillian Gish day they ran Intolerance where she's in it maybe 5 mins, but it did fill up a long running time slot. I think Becket is a Paramount film which would be more expensive to show.

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I would have loved to have seen some of his early British and early Fox films (My Cousin Rachel, etc.) Most of the post Cleopatra stuff is trash.

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Just like if TCM were to air SUPERMAN (1978) on a 'Marlon Brando' SUTS Day.

I remember reading a Richard Burton quote from somewhere . . . wish I could remember where, but it went something like this:

"I've done some of the most awful rubbish in order to have someplace to go in the morning". 

I've always enjoyed the 1978 suspense movie THE MEDUSA TOUCH.  It's a lot of fun with Burton having telekinesis and going off the deep end.  To kill! 

 

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15 minutes ago, lydecker said:

I would have loved to have seen some of his early British and early Fox films (My Cousin Rachel, etc.) Most of the post Cleopatra stuff is trash.

Agree.

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58 minutes ago, Mima/Nana said:

I wish that when the people that pick these Burton movies had included one of his best like BECKETT instead of an ensemble movie like The Longest Day in which Burton for about 20 minutes! What is wrong with programmers at TCM?

They are doing something similar for Robert Redford's day, showing A Bridge Too Far .  The movie is almost three hours long and Redford has a pretty small, if memorable, part.

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I think Beckett was produced by Hal Wallis (Elvis complained that Wallis was using the profits from his Presley movies to make good serious films ! )  I noticed a lot of Hal Wallis movies ,the ones he did as an independent are not shown or very rarely on TCM

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40 minutes ago, Peebs said:

They are doing something similar for Robert Redford's day, showing A Bridge Too Far .  The movie is almost three hours long and Redford has a pretty small, if memorable, part.

YUP!

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11 minutes ago, nakano said:

I think Beckett was produced by Hal Wallis (Elvis complained that Wallis was using the profits from his Presley movies to make good serious films ! )  I noticed a lot of Hal Wallis movies ,the ones he did as an independent are not shown or very rarely on TCM

Because they were released through Paramount (after he left Warners in the mid 40s)

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3 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Because they were released through Paramount (after he left Warners in the mid 40s)

This is the reason for sure, Paramount has a tv network here in Canada and they never show any movie,what a waste.

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1 hour ago, lydecker said:

I would have loved to have seen some of his early British and early Fox films (My Cousin Rachel, etc.) Most of the post Cleopatra stuff is trash.

Yes, with the exception of 1964's The Night of the Iguana and probably his best ever performance as George in 1966's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?  ( He was robbed of the Oscar for that one!)  My Cousin Rachel was his first American movie and he received a Supporting Oscar nod, although it seems he does have as much screen time as Olivia de Havilland.

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41 minutes ago, filmnoirguy said:

Yes, with the exception of 1964's The Night of the Iguana and probably his best ever performance as George in 1966's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?  ( He was robbed of the Oscar for that one!)  My Cousin Rachel was his first American movie and he received a Supporting Oscar nod, although it seems he does have as much screen time as Olivia de Havilland.

Agree with all your points.

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I've always liked Dickey. Most excellent actor and also that wonderful voice. My favorite Burton film is

The Spy Who Came In from the Cold. Other good ones are Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Look Back in

Anger, and Nineteen Eighty-Four. I think that was his last film. If so, it makes a fine last role. I also found

another reason to like Burton, which amps him up at least 25% in my estimation:

In November 1974, Burton was banned permanently from BBC productions for writing two newspaper articles questioning the sanity of Winston Churchill and others in power during World War II – Burton reported hating them "virulently" for the alleged promise to wipe out all Japanese people on the planet. The publication of these articles coincided with what would have been Churchill's centenary, and came after Burton had played him in a favourable light in A Walk with Destiny, with considerable help from the Churchill family.  (Wikipedia)

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4 hours ago, Hibi said:

 I think Becket is a Paramount film which would be more expensive to show.

Although Becket, for some reason, is a Paramount Orphan, which is now EVERY-freakin'-where on streaming.

And I'd be posting the SCTV parody of Becket right now (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zY1Me-Oo84Q ) if it didn't need mentioning that 1984, as a UA orphan, is also every-freakin'-where on streaming, and yes, one of Burton's best performances for his last.  (I recently listened to an audiobook of the Orwell original, and John Hurt and Richard Burton were so perfectly cast in the movie, it sounded as if even the reader was trying to invoke imitations of Hurt and Burton as Smith and O'Brien.)

The equally orphaned The Medusa Touch, however...not so much.

 

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2 hours ago, filmnoirguy said:

My Cousin Rachel was his first American movie and he received a Supporting Oscar nod, although it seems he does have as much screen time as Olivia de Havilland.

Oddly enough, he has much more screen time than she does--40 minutes more, according to the article below.  He's onscreen 85% of the time!  This makes it the second-longest performance ever nominated for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar: 1 hour, 23 minutes, and 57 seconds.  (The longest in absolute terms is Frank Finlay as Iago in the 1965 film version of Shakespeare's Othello, although Finlay is only onscreen 55% of the time [1:30:43], since the film itself is so much longer. )

https://www.goldderby.com/feature/best-supporting-actor-oscar-nominees-longest-performance-record-1204000932/

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2 minutes ago, Fausterlitz said:

Oddly enough, he has much more screen time than she does--40 minutes more, according to the article below.  He's onscreen 85% of the time!  This makes it the second-longest performance ever nominated for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar: 1 hour, 23 minutes, and 57 seconds.  (The longest in absolute terms is Frank Finlay as Iago in the 1965 film version of Shakespeare's Othello, although Finlay is only onscreen 55% of the time [1:30:43], since the film itself is so much longer. )

https://www.goldderby.com/feature/best-supporting-actor-oscar-nominees-longest-performance-record-1204000932/

WOW. What made them pitch him as supporting? Was the Best Actor category crowded that year? (He lost anyway!)

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9 minutes ago, Hibi said:

WOW. What made them pitch him as supporting? Was the Best Actor category crowded that year? (He lost anyway!)

Good question, and I wish I knew.  Perhaps because this was so early in his career (this was his first U.S. film), they figured his odds were better in the supporting category, rather than trying to compete against more famous actors for a lead role--although as you point out, he ultimately lost to Anthony Quinn's 27-minute performance in Viva Zapata! 

For the record, the Best Actor nominees that year were:

Gary Cooper, High Noon

Marlon Brando, Viva Zapata!

Kirk Douglas, The Bad and the Beautiful

José Ferrer, Moulin Rouge

Alec Guinness, The Lavender Hill Mob

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Equus showing tonight,there is some tough scenes with horses in it.The movie was entirely filmed in Ontario Canada a US-UK Production though.I always liked and remebered Sidney Lumet line about his problems with the film he said    ' The producers wanted a happier ending so we changed it so that Equus wins the Kentucky Derby' but they refused this one...🙂

 

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Re: Becket, maybe this falls into the politically correct/woke category. Although we don't expect these quasi-historical films to be accurate, making Becket a Saxon in the play and then film was outrageous, and was probably a mistake from Jean Anouilh. Becket was a Norman. If anything, Henry II was partly Saxon, through his material grandmother (Margaret of Wessex). Making Becket a Saxon sets up the whole class consciousness thing that informs some of the movie, so it's just too wrong. (But it is a great movie, and both leads would have been better choices for the Academy Award for Best Actor than the winner that year (possibly the worst Best Actor choice in Oscar history, considering the four other nominees)!

thomas_becket_people_page.jpg?crop=1&cro

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Well - not all of Richard Burton's great films played on TCM.  I have to agree with other posters that Burton's standout performance as George in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" is amazing.   Elizabeth Taylor is absolutely wonderful as the vulgar, direct  Martha while Burton plays George as the one in the marriage trying to control everything - like a ringmaster.  

Thanks so much for the suggestions of Burton movies posters have made by posters.  I haven't seen "My Cousin Rachel", "Becket" and "1984".  I will definitely look for these films.

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14 minutes ago, Toto said:

Well - not all of Richard Burton's great films played on TCM.  I have to agree with other posters that Burton's standout performance as George in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" is amazing.   Elizabeth Taylor is absolutely wonderful as the vulgar, direct  Martha while Burton plays George as the one in the marriage trying to control everything - like a ringmaster.  

Thanks so much for the suggestions of Burton movies posters have made by posters.  I haven't seen "My Cousin Rachel", "Becket" and "1984".  I will definitely look for these films.

If you enjoy Gothic romance, Toto, I think you will like MY COUSIN RACHEL.   While I think Burton is at his best in cynical modern roles, in this film he is youthfully innocent, impassioned, ardent, and determined to solve the "mystery" that is his cousin Rachel, fascinatingly played by Olivia de Havilland in what I believe is one of her best performances ever!  A masterpiece of shading and subtlety!  Great actress.  

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