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9 minutes ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

If you enjoy Gothic romance, Toto, I think you will like MY COUSIN RACHEL.   While I think Burton is at his best in cynical modern roles, in this film he is youthfully innocent, impassioned, ardent, and determined to solve the "mystery" that is his cousin Rachel, fascinatingly played by Olivia de Havilland in what I believe is one of her best performances ever!  A masterpiece of shading and subtlety!  Great actress.  

Bronxgirl - thanks!  I have got to see this movie!

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With apologizes to many other greats, Burton is my choice for best actor of the twentieth century. 

He gives fantastic performances in many of his films, and he can even save a dud or sometimes be the only worthwhile part of it. 

I recently spent roughly two hours watching 1968's Candy, for which is difficult to drum up any support, even as a product of its time with an interesting cast. Thank goodness for Burton, who manages to be the best part of this dreck. 

I love Burton's work in My Cousin Rachel, Look Back in Anger,  The Night of the Iguana, Anne of the Thousand Days, Becket,  and Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf.   Burton and Deborah Kerr's scenes in ...Iguana are such perfection, and I think those two help Ava Gardner to give a better than usual performance.  His work opposite Peter O'Toole in Becket is where I began to realize that there probably isn't a better actor than Burton.

Even when the film isn't my favorite, such as The Spy Who Came in from the Cold or The Sandpiper, he's still reliably wonderful.

I love when, as Louis Jordan is taking Elizabeth Taylor away from him in The VIP's, Burton calls him "Gigolo! Buffoon! Diner-outer! Notorious Sponge!" That was so funny I had to memorize it. (Jordan is no slouch in the scene either.)

I just watched Equus for the first time and I can't imagine what it would be without Burton. I'll be catching up on the war films that were part of Burton day. I can't say I'm terribly excited to watch them, but they must be part of my film education. 

I regret that I was born too late to see this giant on the stage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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18 hours ago, nakano said:

Equus showing tonight,there is some tough scenes with horses in it.The movie was entirely filmed in Ontario Canada a US-UK Production though.I always liked and remebered Sidney Lumet line about his problems with the film he said    ' The producers wanted a happier ending so we changed it so that Equus wins the Kentucky Derby' but they refused this one...🙂

 

Too bad they showed it in the middle of the night. He should've won the Oscar for that. Academy didn't like him, I guess. Not even an honorary one. :(

I guess due to nudity

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10 hours ago, Swithin said:

Re: Becket, maybe this falls into the politically correct/woke category. Although we don't expect these quasi-historical films to be accurate, making Becket a Saxon in the play and then film was outrageous, and was probably a mistake from Jean Anouilh. Becket was a Norman. If anything, Henry II was partly Saxon, through his material grandmother (Margaret of Wessex). Making Becket a Saxon sets up the whole class consciousness thing that informs some of the movie, so it's just too wrong. (But it is a great movie, and both leads would have been better choices for the Academy Award for Best Actor than the winner that year (possibly the worst Best Actor choice in Oscar history, considering the four other nominees)!

thomas_becket_people_page.jpg?crop=1&cro

You think Rex Harrison is the worst best actor choice in history?????

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15 minutes ago, Hibi said:

You think Rex Harrison is the worst best actor choice in history?????

I haven't made a thorough, scientific study of all the winners and nominees over the decades, but:

1. Harrison plays the role reasonably well.  He had already performed it so often on stage;

2. The competition that year was remarkable. In addition to Burton and O'Toole for Becket, the nominees include Anthony Quinn (Zorba the Greek) and Peter Sellers (Dr. Strangelove). Any of those four deserved the Oscar instead of Harrison.

There may be other years where I would have preferred a different winner, but it's rare for all four of the other nominees to give such transcendent performances and be more deserving.

 

 

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I personally preferred Leslie Howard in the non-musical version rather than Rex Harrison.  And Wendy Hiller as Eliza was wonderful.  Burton couldn't do comedy like O'Toole (King Henry II in 2 movies) in My Favorite Year (a favorite with TCM).  Robert Shaw gave a great performance as Henry VIII in A Man for All Seasons.  Burton was just okay.  As for Oscars, sometimes they seem rigged (Leonardo D. for The Revenant?), Louise Fletcher for Nurse Fletcher, who was really supporting.

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34 minutes ago, NipkowDisc said:

I always liked the way Dick handled Genevieve Bujold in anne of a thousand days.

he showed her who was boss.

:D

Anne of the Thousand Days Blu-ray - Richard Burton

He pretty much did the same with Liz in TAMING OF THE SHREW.  ;) 

If they wanted to kill time, perhaps TCM could have showed THE ROBE in place of THE LONGEST DAY  and put one of the two Burton films I also liked but haven't seen mentioned so far....

PRINCE OF PLAYERS('55)

ICE PALACE('60)

Sepiatone

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3 hours ago, -noiramour- said:

I recently spent roughly two hours watching 1968's Candy, for which is difficult to drum up any support, even as a product of its time with an interesting cast. Thank goodness for Burton, who manages to be the best part of this dreck. 

Candy was another psychedelic project like Head (and others) meant to shock and break with late 60s social norms.  It took a ton of talent to cobble that dreck together. Buck Henry screenplay starring Ewa Aulin, Marlon Brando, Richard Burton, James Coburn, John Huston, Walter Matthau, and Ringo Starr. 

I'm working my way through Burton's stuff, mostly with Taylor. I did see Night of the Iguana. It looked very interesting based on the trailer. Well the trailer was misleading, but it's still interesting, just not in the way I expected. I've seen Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolf many times, always enjoy Burton's sharp wit. Watched The Comedians the other day, I had thought that was actually shot in Haiti, guess not, some small African country called Dahomey. The Sandpiper is on the DVR and I've watched it several times. Taming of the Shrew was on last night. The first half was hard to get through, but once Burton begins his pursuit in earnest I got interested. By the end I was hooked. I've got Equus on the DVR, it sounds awful but I'll give it a shot.

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I've seen a few Burton movies that are from his later years. 

WILD GEESE, The (1978-UK) is pretty good.  Stewart Granger is a double-crossing muthafocka in this action pic! 

ABSOLUTION (1978-UK) was a decent movie.  LIES!  Filthy stinking LIES!  

I've already mentioned THE MEDUSA TOUCH (1978-UK) but I'll mention it again:  Don't pysse (sic) off a telekinetic Burton!  You'll Pay! 

HAMMERSMITH IS OUT (1972) is worth watching once, I think, just to check it out.  Burton is a crazy mental patient in this one.  With Miss Liz, Beau Bridges and Peter Ustinov. 

CIRCLE OF TWO (1980-Canadian) is ok.  Considering the plot of the movie it could a very exploitive film, but it's not.  You see Tatum topless for a couple of seconds and then Burton insists she get dressed.   That's it for 'exploitation elements'.  There's 2 versions of this movie; each version has different footage not seen in the other; one version is not simply a 'cut' version of the other.  The music score is different, too, plus the ending is different in both.  

BRIEF ENCOUNTER (1974-UK Tvm).  I've yet to read a positive review of this Sophia Loren/Richard Burton remake of the '45 film, but it's the only movie I can think of where the word "furtive" is used!  So that's gotta count for something, right?  Heck, even the U.S. Magnetic Video Corporation VHS release makes use of the word "furtive" on its plot summary.  Sophia Loren says later in the movie how her relationship has grown "dirty" and "furtive"!   😲  (Say it ain't so . . . but 'tis). 

→ So remember everyone:  Don't let the word 'F-U-R-T-I-V-E' end up in the scrap heap of history!  Use it in a sentence today!  You'll be glad you did!  🤪  

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18 minutes ago, Mr. Gorman said:

ABSOLUTION (1978-UK) was a decent movie.  LIES!  Filthy stinking LIES!  

I liked this one. Although filmed in 1978, it wasn't released in the US until 1988, 4 years after Burton's death. That's when I first saw it.

It was written by Anthony Shaffer, the author of Sleuth, so there are some twists and shocks in it.

Burton gives a fine performance here as the priest who is deceived by a disturbed student in a boys school.

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1 hour ago, Mr. Gorman said:

I've seen a few Burton movies that are from his later years. 

WILD GEESE, The (1978-UK) is pretty good.  Stewart Granger is a double-crossing muthafocka in this action pic! 

ABSOLUTION (1978-UK) was a decent movie.  LIES!  Filthy stinking LIES!  

I've already mentioned THE MEDUSA TOUCH (1978-UK) but I'll mention it again:  Don't pysse (sic) off a telekinetic Burton!  You'll Pay! 

HAMMERSMITH IS OUT (1972) is worth watching once, I think, just to check it out.  Burton is a crazy mental patient in this one.  With Miss Liz, Beau Bridges and Peter Ustinov. 

CIRCLE OF TWO (1980-Canadian) is ok.  Considering the plot of the movie it could a very exploitive film, but it's not.  You see Tatum topless for a couple of seconds and then Burton insists she get dressed.   That's it for 'exploitation elements'.  There's 2 versions of this movie; each version has different footage not seen in the other; one version is not simply a 'cut' version of the other.  The music score is different, too, plus the ending is different in both.  

BRIEF ENCOUNTER (1974-UK Tvm).  I've yet to read a positive review of this Sophia Loren/Richard Burton remake of the '45 film, but it's the only movie I can think of where the word "furtive" is used!  So that's gotta count for something, right?  Heck, even the U.S. Magnetic Video Corporation VHS release makes use of the word "furtive" on its plot summary.  Sophia Loren says later in the movie how her relationship has grown "dirty" and "furtive"!   😲  (Say it ain't so . . . but 'tis). 

→ So remember everyone:  Don't let the word 'F-U-R-T-I-V-E' end up in the scrap heap of history!  Use it in a sentence today!  You'll be glad you did!  🤪  

I've always wanted to see Hammersmith Is Out! I think it was independently produced and there are probably legal issues. Liz as a bleach blonde hash slinging waitress am sure is something to see!

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39 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I liked this one. Although filmed in 1978, it wasn't released in the US until 1988, 4 years after Burton's death. That's when I first saw it.

It was written by Anthony Shaffer, the author of Sleuth, so there are some twists and shocks in it.

Burton gives a fine performance here as the priest who is deceived by a disturbed student in a boys school.

I've never heard of this one!

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22 hours ago, Hibi said:

WOW. What made them pitch him as supporting? Was the Best Actor category crowded that year? (He lost anyway!)

The billing was:   Olivia de Havilland in Daphne du Maurier's "My Cousin Rachel"

with Richard Burton (below the tile) which, back in the day, automatically put him in the Supporting Category by the Academy.

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5 minutes ago, filmnoirguy said:

The billing was:   Olivia de Havilland in Daphne du Maurier's "My Cousin Rachel"

with Richard Burton (below the tile) which, back in the day, automatically put him in the Supporting Category by the Academy.

I thought it depended on what category (pushed by the studios) the voters voted for them in?

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1 hour ago, filmnoirguy said:

The billing was:   Olivia de Havilland in Daphne du Maurier's "My Cousin Rachel"

with Richard Burton (below the tile) which, back in the day, automatically put him in the Supporting Category by the Academy.

Where are you getting this "back in the day"?     It was my understanding that under the studio-system,  the studio would provide the potential nominees as well as the category.

I don't have details about My Cousin Rachel,  but it could have been contractual on DeHavilland's part.   My Cousin Rachel being somewhat of a come-back film (3 years after winning an Oscar for The Heiress),  could have had it in her contract that she was the only leading actor in the film.

Another reason is that the studio felt Burton had a better chance of being one of the limited number of nominees in the Supporting Category verses the Leading one.

I.e. better to have him nominated in that category than no category at all.    

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5 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

Candy was another psychedelic project like Head (and others) meant to shock and break with late 60s social norms.  It took a ton of talent to cobble that dreck together. Buck Henry screenplay starring Ewa Aulin, Marlon Brando, Richard Burton, James Coburn, John Huston, Walter Matthau, and Ringo Starr. 

"Was Candy faithful?  Only to the book!"  (original tagline) - Like "Myra Breckinridge", another example of a then-trendy shock-satirical bestseller that got stars in for the "scandalous" movie adaptation that long outlived its short-shelf-life source.  

That said, Burton does do a good job of playing a completely fraudulent bed-hopping poet laureate, adding his list to the name of Great English Actors Who Have an Actual Functioning Sense of Humor.

And yes, I'm not a big fan of brick-subtle late-60's Buck Henry social "satire" even when Mike Nichols directs it, which...he didn't here.

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I remember when CANDY (1968) came out on homevideo in the late 1990s.  ANCHOR BAY released it and I bought the W/S tape.  I'd already read the review of "Candy" in the Leonard Maltin Guide so I had a decent idea of what to expect when I watched it.  

IN regards to MYRA BRECKINRIDGE (1970), however, what a POS that was.  All those movie clips I found to be more distracting than I could tolerate.  As bad as "Myra" is I can't help but think it would've been better -- relatively speaking -- without so many old movie clips interspersed throughout.  The only good thing that came from MYRA BRECKINRIDGE was that I was able to sell my Magnetic VHS tape for a pile of money years ago just before the movie got released on DVD.  I do not miss owning that movie.  'nuff said. 

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I recall going with a few friends to see Richard in Bluebeard, though admittedly we were more

interested in some of his co-stars. Either way it was still a stinker. 

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16 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

I recall going with a few friends to see Richard in Bluebeard, though admittedly we were more

interested in some of his co-stars. 

So was Burton,he had affairs with Nathalie Delon and Raquel Welch during the filming.

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I believe Richard Burton's final appearance while still living was playing himself in an episode of The Fall Guy. Even as a seventh grader who'd never seen him in anything at that point, I was like, "Isn't he too big a star to be doing this?" 1984 was a little later, I think. 

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14 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

I believe Richard Burton's final appearance while still living was playing himself in an episode of The Fall Guy. Even as a seventh grader who'd never seen him in anything at that point, I was like, "Isn't he too big a star to be doing this?" 1984 was a little later, I think. 

Like Laurence Olivier doing his onslaught of bad roles in the late 70's, stage actors due for retirement or facing Alzheimer's (or whatever caused Olivier's retirement) know that the RSC doesn't pay residuals, and they're going to have to take some film roles to leave a little something for retirement and legacy.

Burton did a lot of work, including TV, up until 1983 (including appearing in TV-movies with daughter Kate), as he probably knew his days were numbered.  1984 still went out on a high note, though.

(The '83 PBS "Alice in Wonderland" being one example of dad-and-daughter TV work: )

 

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