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James Bond Trivia


cinemaman
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Nicely done, Bunny!  I saw The Matador when it came out and remember liking it.  Your last question about The Tailor of Panama reminded me of this movie with  Brosnan again playing against the Bond image.

Your thread...

 

18 hours ago, BunnyWhit said:

The Matador (2005) -- Haven't seen it, but read about it to answer your question, Peebs, and now I think I want to see it.

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George Lazenby in Alfred Hitchock Presents (1989) "Diamonds Aren't Forever"?

Diamonds Aren't Forever | George Lazenby Reprises James Bond - YouTube

 

While looking for the answer I also found these:  

Timothy Dalton was in an episode of Tales from the Crypt (1992) Co-starring Walter Gotell, who played General Gogol in The Living Daylights (1987) with Dalton.

2020 SNL with Daniel Craig  James Bond Scene - SNL - YouTube

1987 SNL with Sting and Steve Martin Bullets Aren't Cheap - SNL - YouTube

 

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13 hours ago, BunnyWhit said:

Good work, Peebs -- Lazenby on Hitchcock is the one I had in mind. You raised the bar! Thanks, and it's all yours....

Thanks Bunny!  I haven't seen that episode but it looks like it might be a fun one.  

 

Next:  Inspired by this season of holiday giving, in what movie does Bond receive the item pictured below and describe  the circumstances under which he receives it.

 

Jack the Bulldog James Bond Gifts

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Who's a good boy?! That's the Union Jack Bulldog from Royal Doulton. Jack was designed by Royal Doulton designer Charles Noke and launched in 1941. The figurines were reintroduced during WWII. 

A pristine version of this little pup appears on M's desk in Skyfall (2012).

bulldog_skyfall_dench.jpg     

Jack survives the attack on the office, and the "restored after explosion" figure pictured in your query is then bequeathed to Bond (and we learn M's name). This is significant, as M had told Bond to take a desk job. From her desk to his, so to speak.

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Jack appears again in Spectre (2015) on Bond's table.

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Jack also makes an appearance in No Time to Die (2021). Will it be his last?

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Recently I've seen a few posts/vlogs/rants in various places on the internet in which posters/vlogers/ranters posit that Jack is merely a cute trinket. Perhaps they view the figurine as a suggestion that M actually possesses a spark of whimsey. The people who have posted/vlogged/ranted thusly might fancy themselves Bond fans, but they clearly are not Anglophiles, for Jack's significance runs so much deeper. The English Bulldog, so called because it originated in England, was registered by the AKC in 1934, but has a much longer history with the English. Earliest mentions of the bulldog are from the thirteenth century. These dogs were bred to chase and hold cattle in a "sport" known as bull baiting. The bulldog's squat body and broad shoulders provided protection against ramming or goring, and a strong jaw and upward nose allowed the dog to breathe unobstructed while latching onto a bull's nose in a fierce and unrelenting grip. This cruel sport was banned in 1835, at which time it was assumed that the breed would serve no other purpose and die out. Instead, the bulldog made the transition from fighting animal to gentle, loyal, and beloved family pet. Still, the bulldog represents strength, tenacity, and pluck. During the war years and the premierships of Winston Churchill (1940-1945, 1951-1955), the British adoration of the breed deepened, and to this day the bulldog symbolizes a fighting spirit with deep resolve. In the Bond films, Jack draped with the Union Flag is a symbol of the staying power of Great Britain, of MI6, and of Bond. 

 

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Wow!  Another impressive dissertation from Professor Bunny, Bond scholar extraordinaire.  You are the top dog on this thread.  

I love the bulldog figurine.  I hadn't heard that some people complained about it.  You are right, it's got a strong history as the symbol of GB which made it a fitting prop for M, I thought.

The thread is your capable hands.

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Thank you, Peebs! Like you, I think Jack is a doggone good prop that says so much in compact fashion. I'd love to know Judi Dench's take on the little bulldog. Born in 1934, she was old enough during WWII to understand the significance of the symbol, not to mention she also would have seen what many saw -- a sameness in the faces of Churchill and a bulldog.

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Let's try this next....

There is another spy movie in which Jack makes an appearance. Can you name it?

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Thanks, Bunny.  I really like Tinker Tailor Solider Spy, sort of a more cerebral quiet spy movie.  

 

Next:  Keeping with the last question, name the five actors who have played John le Carre's spy George Smiley in movies and tv.  (One actor played the character in a movie adaptation but the character's name was changed.)

 

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Gary  Oldman   Tinker  Tailor  Soldier  Spy   Alec  Guinness   Smiley's   People    Rupert  Davies  The  Spy  Who  Came  in  From  the  Cold    Denholm  Elliott  A  Murder  of  Quality            Columbia  and  Paramount  Pictures  had  rights  issue  of  the  name  George  Smiley ,  so  in  movie  The  Deadly  Affair  that  name  was  changed  to  Charles  Dobbs  and  played  by   James  Mason .  Thanks

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1 hour ago, cinemaman said:

Gary  Oldman   Tinker  Tailor  Soldier  Spy   Alec  Guinness   Smiley's   People    Rupert  Davies  The  Spy  Who  Came  in  From  the  Cold    Denholm  Elliott  A  Murder  of  Quality            Columbia  and  Paramount  Pictures  had  rights  issue  of  the  name  George  Smiley ,  so  in  movie  The  Deadly  Affair  that  name  was  changed  to  Charles  Dobbs  and  played  by   James  Mason .  Thanks

That's it. Thanks for including that interesting little nugget about why they changed the character's name for the James Mason movie.  I think I've seen three of those Smiley adaptations.  

Well done, Cinemaman!  

Your turn...

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Thanks  Peebs  next:  British  television  had  an  popular  spy  show and  had a  large  group  of  James  Bond  Stars  that  did  the show  (  tens  stars  total).  Please  name  the  show,   the  actor and  his  character  name  (  the  show  was  in  the  Sixties) .  Bonus  Question   Name  the  singer  who  had  an  hit  song  with  the  title  of  this  series.  Thanks

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Is it The Champions (1968-1969) with Stuart Damon (who died just this year) as Craig Stirling? Looking through the cast list, I see lots and lots of actors who were in Bond films. 

I know Carrie Underwood has a song called "The Champion" -- note, no s -- but I don't follow contemporary country music, so I couldn't hum the tune if my life depended on it. 

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It is my understanding that The Prisoner (1967-1968) is a spin-off of Secret Agent (1964-1967). So say some, while others are unsure. When Number 6 (McGoohan as the Prisoner) is revealed as a retired spy, many viewers believed (or assumed, or hoped, or whatever you like) that the character was indeed Secret Agent John Drake. I've not yet viewed any of the episodes, but I've read a few articles about The Prisoner, and I suspect the one-season run was a result of its avant garde, Orwellian vagaries. I also seem to remember reading that the idea for The Prisoner came from McGoohan; is that accurate?

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4 hours ago, BunnyWhit said:

It is my understanding that The Prisoner (1967-1968) is a spin-off of Secret Agent (1964-1967). So say some, while others are unsure. When Number 6 (McGoohan as the Prisoner) is revealed as a retired spy, many viewers believed (or assumed, or hoped, or whatever you like) that the character was indeed Secret Agent John Drake. I've not yet viewed any of the episodes, but I've read a few articles about The Prisoner, and I suspect the one-season run was a result of its avant garde, Orwellian vagaries. I also seem to remember reading that the idea for The Prisoner came from McGoohan; is that accurate?

I'd recommend The Prisoner.  It is an odd, enrgrossing ride for 17 episodes.  I found the finale to be disappointing, however.

Yes, although there are differing stories The Prisoner was inspired by the idea of what happens when spies retire, what would happen to John Drake.  One of The Prisoner episodes is based on a two-part Danger Man episode.  Several actors had supporting roles on both shows.  Another Danger Man episode called "Colony Three" sounds very similar to to The Prisoner set-up.  From Prisoner wiki: "... Drake infiltrates a spy school in Eastern Europe during the Cold War. The school, in the middle of nowhere, is set up to look like a normal English town in which pupils and instructors mix as in any other normal city, but the instructors are virtual prisoners with little hope of ever leaving. It is often thought this episode was a precursor to The Prisoner."

Good sleuthing,  Bunny! Your thread...

 

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