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What movies to introduce teens to classic films?


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We’ve been introducing our 15 and 17 year old nephews to older movies whenever they visit.  They only get Disney type movies at home.  Over the past few years they’ve seen and enjoyed Robin Hood (Errol Flynn version), Predator, The Hunt for Red October, Escape from New York, and Bullit (the latest, which they loved).  Any ideas where to go next?  Maybe a classic Western?

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Hello,

This month is the perfect opportunity to see classic film and actors at their best.

For a western, How the West was Won is an epic with lots of great actors involved. It comes on next Saturday August 14 at 6 a.m. If that’s too early, DVR it and watch it later.

The Big Country is another good one, coming on August 14 at 8 p.m.

If they want to experience Judy Garland from child actress to Adult actress, her films will be shown on August 15.

There are a wealth of great films to share this from all genres and decades.

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2 hours ago, Lindakay1 said:

We’ve been introducing our 15 and 17 year old nephews to older movies whenever they visit.  They only get Disney type movies at home.  Over the past few years they’ve seen and enjoyed Robin Hood (Errol Flynn version), Predator, The Hunt for Red October, Escape from New York, and Bullit (the latest, which they loved).  Any ideas where to go next?  Maybe a classic Western?

Sounds like they'll appreciate anything that's well done.  See how they like The Cowboys and True Grit for westerns. Then a war movie. 

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To Kill A Mockingbird (a friend of mine reminds me that Atticus makes the girl blameworthy)

Rashamon and Life is Beautiful (show with subtitles)

High Noon (allegorical in many ways)

The Haunting or The Innocents or Dead of Night for good psych horror

Great Expectations with Alec Guiness and John Mills

I would find out what books they are reading (e.g., noticed  many high schoolers read The Old Man and the Sea, The Great Gatsby, etc.) and have them compare it to movie versions.  When I student taught, we read (aloud) The Glass Menagerie - then we watched one of the movie versions.  In a film class, All The President's Men was shown - it is very depressing how many people forget or don't know anything about Watergate.

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I don't know about your teens, but for teens in general -

Murder by Contract  (1958)

Get 'em used to the black and white world with something offbeat and almost modern.

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1 hour ago, NipkowDisc said:

I can't think of a better movie to introduce younger people to Hollywood's golden age than angels with dirty faces.

That's a good one Nip, the problem being that I believe there are rights problems with it that make it unavailable. It hasn't been on TCM since late 2009 and it had many showings on TCM  prior to that. I have the old Warner Gangsters DVD of it, so I can watch it anytime that I want.  

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Usually something light or comedic works for getting teens these days into black and white.  Laurel and Hardy maybe...  

Or the bevy of "screwball" comedies of the '30's and '40's.  Or maybe a few of those '50's "juvenile delinquent"  flicks that weren't really meant to be comedies but might strike the kids as comical.   

And while Nip's suggestion is good,  my kid's intro to the "Golden Age" was another Bogie classic, DEAD END.   They thought The Dead End Kids jargon was a hoot. ----

"EAHhhhhhh!  Yeh MUDDUH wears army boots!" ........ "Eahhhh, I'll WHALLOP ya!"   

But it turns out(as one daughter informed me) that as the years passed and whenever they knew it was on the tube somewhere, they'd tune in to relive the laughs and it occurred to them that there was actually a compelling story there!    And the older they got the more they understood some of the references in it (Like what AL JENKINS meant when he told Bogie the girl he asked Al to look up was "busy" ;) ).  So, they're not aficionados,  but don't refuse to look into a classic movie now and then(at my suggestion).

Sepiatone

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When I was a teenager, my mother introduced me to the film "The Bachelor and the Bobby Soxer" with Cary Grant, Myrna Loy and a teenage Shirley Temple.  I thought it was hilarious and I think I related to the whole story about a teenage crush.  I think this started my life long love of Cary Grant movies.

The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer (1947) | Hometowns to Hollywood

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15 hours ago, Lindakay1 said:

We’ve been introducing our 15 and 17 year old nephews to older movies whenever they visit.  They only get Disney type movies at home.  Over the past few years they’ve seen and enjoyed Robin Hood (Errol Flynn version), Predator, The Hunt for Red October, Escape from New York, and Bullit (the latest, which they loved).  Any ideas where to go next?  Maybe a classic Western?

Hey There. !

 

     Several Possibilites..

_

First.. for the Older Nominees...

 

Sergeant York.

Shoes of the Fisherman.

Keys of the Kingdom.

Ice Cold In Alex.

Friendly Persuasion.

God's Little Acre (i Will Carefully Say: be.. Discerning, With This One Though.)

Lilies of the Field.

The Searchers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To Go Along With A Couple Newer Possibilities:

Ain't Them Bodies Saints.

A Ghost Story.

Pete's Dragon. (The Lowery Version.)

Tomorrowland.

A Very Long Engagement. (EXQUISITE. But Be (Very) Careful and Exercise Ample Caution with this Title As Well.)

. ...

If Your in the mood for (Even) +More Possibilities.. 

   Lemme Know.

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*Just a few off the top of my head: 


Alien (1979) 

Aliens (1986) 

Raiders of the Lost Ark, Temple of Doom, Last Crusade 

The Goonies (1985) 

Jaws (1975) 

The Princess Bride (1987) 

Jurassic Park (1993) 

 

 

 

 

 

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If you feel that you must go with a Western: Blazing Saddles (1974).

Hatari (1962) might be in keeping with the action-adventure motiff.

The Hidden Fortress (1958) is often a favorite.

Have you thought of introducing them to English movies? The Lavender Hill Mob (1951) The Ladykillers (1955) or How to Murder a Rich Uncle (1957).

 

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I agree with the BLAZING SADDLES & add YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN

PSYCHO (it will get them "over" B&W film-trust me)

Start a great Wilder triple feature with the pow of Marilyn:

SOME LIKE IT HOT/STALAG 13/SUNSET BLVD 

Our teen loved them.

 

 

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I only have limited experience with showing classic movies to teenagers, but our nephew seemed to like The Bank Dick.   To a younger person, WC Fields’ humor may seem kind of “edgy” and therefore funny, with domestic conflict, deception, zaniness, and physical comedy in the mix.

I second the nomination of Blazing Saddles, which our nephew really  loved.  Young Frankenstein is also a great recommendation.

Now that I think about it, these are all movies I loved when I was a teenager, many years ago.

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With Blazing Saddles you have to teach children that calling blacks by a Yiddish name was not meant to be racist.

When you show Young Frankenstein, please tell students that Frankenstein is not the name of the monster.

Sophie's Choice, Glory, A Soldier's Story, Woman of the Year, Modern Times (and other silent movies)

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I find silent comedies (Loyd, Keaton, Chaplin) are more favored by teens and other youngsters more than silent dramas, which many also see as comical, but would rather pass on.

CHAYA, let's not try to "whitewash"(pun intended) things by asserting the Yiddish term is the ONLY one in "Blazing Saddles" that's NOT racist.  ;)  And sure.

EVERYBODY at first gets drawn in somehow of calling the MONSTER Frankenstein.    B)  And I have friends who STILL think THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME ('39) is a "horror" flick. :rolleyes:

4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I agree with the BLAZING SADDLES & add YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN

PSYCHO (it will get them "over" B&W film-trust me)

Start a great Wilder triple feature with the pow of Marilyn:

SOME LIKE IT HOT/STALAG 13/SUNSET BLVD 

Our teen loved them.

I would think "Young Frankenstein" would get them to clear that hurdle a bit easier.   

My "kids" are now well into their 40's,  and as I stated, have seen and liked a certain amount of "classic" movies  before their teen years.  And the dead horse I'll beat is insisting comedies work better than  heavy dramas(at first)  and some classic horror and  stuff like KING KONG('33) are good too.  But this sort of thing was easier for those of us who were in our 20's when our kids were born rather than those here who list movies THEY loved as teen-agers that came out when I was in my mid 20's or late 30's.   And really, if my kids had their own children, THEY'D be the teens (or older) that the OP aimed at here.  ;)  As more time passes, those teens we're referring to won't be our kids, but our GRANDCHILDREN!  :o   And all those '80's JOHN HUGHES flicks will be considered "classic" films.  :blink: (if they ain't already)

Sepiatone

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I don't quite get the point and purpose of introducing teens to "classic movies." Smacks of trying to force someone to like spinach or play the violin ("It's good for you. You'll learn to like it.").

Many years ago, two preteen nephews (from Holland) of my roommate spent some time in our home. I was watching Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein. The tykes joined me and got a kick out of the movie; they especially were tickled by Costello's antics. Their interest sufficiently piqued, they wanted to see more movies with "Thin and Fat" as they called Bud and Lou.

I grew up (during the early 1960s) watching "classic movies" because they were shown on TV. In Los Angeles, a local station had the "Million Dollar Movie," which showed a movie (No Time for Sergeants springs to mind) every day for a whole week -- the same movie. Several local stations aired horror movie showcases ("Chiller," "Strange Tales," "Weird, Weird World") that showed the Universal horror films and 50s Science-Fiction flicks. Every Halloween, the CBS affiliate had a tradition of showing Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein on "The Early Show" and The Ghost Breakers on "The Late Show." Another station showed East Side Kids-Bowery Boys on Saturday mornings and Sherlock Holmes (with Rathbone and Bruce) in the evenings . Wheeler and Woolsey comedies were routinely shown, as were the "Mexican Spitfire" series. In the wee hours of the morning, Tod Slaughter chillers haunted the airwaves. Late Saturday evenings, a local station showed foreign films such as Two Women and Monsieur Hulot's Holiday.

Nobody "introduced" (or forced) me to watch those movies. Like many of my generation, I was a "TV Idiot." Almost whatever was on, I watched it.

I don't have kids. But, if I did, I hope that I wouldn't feel compelled to introduce them to "classic movies." If a kid expressed an interest in watching old movies, I'd be more than happy to show them to him or her. But, if he/she had no interest in "old movies" -- wouldn't bug me.

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5 hours ago, 37kitties said:

I think The Seven Year Itch might be enjoyed by teens just getting aquainted with "classic" films. The boys will fall in love with Marilyn, though.

One good way to get past a teen's defenses is to pick a film that's savvy and self-aware enough to make a pre-emptive attack on any snooty 21st-century attempt to diss its "dated sentiments":
Try to say that it's "Toxic sexism", and the humor gleefully wallows in how much poor Tom Ewell is trying to deny his hots for Marilyn and panicking when he thinks he has them.  😆

5 hours ago, BingFan said:

I only have limited experience with showing classic movies to teenagers, but our nephew seemed to like The Bank Dick.   To a younger person, WC Fields’ humor may seem kind of “edgy” and therefore funny, with domestic conflict, deception, zaniness, and physical comedy in the mix.

The Bank Dick is okay, or, for those who say "Drinking isn't funny", Never Give a Sucker an Even Break, where the studio tried to keep WC Fields from drinking, and he winks to the audience about it all through the film.  (Like his walking into a drug-store soda counter--"It was supposed to be a saloon, but the censors cut it out.")

3 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

I don't quite get the point and purpose of introducing teens to "classic movies." Smacks of trying to force someone to like spinach or play the violin ("It's good for you. You'll learn to like it.").

Nobody "introduced" (or forced) me to watch those movies. Like many of my generation, I was a "TV Idiot." Almost whatever was on, I watched it.

Well, that's why:  TV doesn't SHOW old movies anymore, and the few that do, think that nobody "bothers" with movies made before 1975 anymore.

We have a new "golden age" where you can find almost any movie you want on disk, streaming and VOD, but to want them, first you have to have heard of them.  And if you've seen some of the fan recommendations on the YouTube reactor-verse, that circle of movies young people have heard of and passed down through generations is shrinking steadily to just a handful of 80's, John Hughes, and horror films.

...Would you have read "Pride & Prejudice" or "Animal Farm" if your high-school English class hadn't MADE you read them for your own educational good?  Although we did have one YouTube reactor who was sent a DVD of John Belushi in "Animal House" and said, "Wait, that's the book we read in high school, right, about the pigs?"  🤦‍♂️

(And okay, so the Mods pulled my post about teens jawdropped by the Marx Brothers and Abbott & Costello because they've lost touch with the concept of Humor.  Right now on YouTube, there are at least two dozen reactors in awed amazement at having seen the "Who's on first?" routine for the very first time.)

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1 hour ago, EricJ said:

(And okay, so the Mods pulled my post about teens jawdropped by the Marx Brothers and Abbott & Costello because they've lost touch with the concept of Humor.  Right now on YouTube, there are at least two dozen reactors in awed amazement at having seen the "Who's on first?" routine for the very first time.)

Golly, that must have been a very offensive post for it to be removed. You didn't analyze teens too harshly, I hope.

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1 hour ago, EricJ said:

Well, that's why:  TV doesn't SHOW old movies anymore, and the few that do, think that nobody "bothers" with movies made before 1975 anymore.

We have a new "golden age" where you can find almost any movie you want on disk, streaming and VOD, but to want them, first you have to have heard of them.  And if you've seen some of the fan recommendations on the YouTube reactor-verse, that circle of movies young people have heard of and passed down through generations is shrinking steadily to just a handful of 80's, John Hughes, and horror films.

...Would you have read "Pride & Prejudice" or "Animal Farm" if your high-school English class hadn't MADE you read them for your own educational good?  Although we did have one YouTube reactor who was sent a DVD of John Belushi in "Animal House" and said, "Wait, that's the book we read in high school, right, about the pigs?"  🤦‍♂️

(And okay, so the Mods pulled my post about teens jawdropped by the Marx Brothers and Abbott & Costello because they've lost touch with the concept of Humor.  Right now on YouTube, there are at least two dozen reactors in awed amazement at having seen the "Who's on first?" routine for the very first time.)

And my response is, so what if "nobody" bothers with old movies?

I love movies. I love old movies. I love really old movies (I recently acquired the 1924 German thriller Waxworks).  But, they are only movies. They are only entertainment. If, in 20 years, "nobody" wants to watch movies made in the 20th century . . . well, the sun will still shine, the world will still turn, and life will go on. But . . .

. . . there will always be folks who will cherish and preserve old movies. The preservation society might become smaller, more rarefied, and itself older, but . . .

. . . there will always be old movies and new generations of folks who love them and who will find them one way or another.

Regarding Animal Farm, I read Orwell's allegory on my own; i.e., it wasn't part of my English studies curriculum. Pride and Prejudice, OTOH, I deliberately skipped.

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38 minutes ago, 37kitties said:

Golly, that must have been a very offensive post for it to be removed. You didn't analyze teens too harshly, I hope.

I jokingly said "You", meaning everybody, when I recommended movies to LK, so the Mods thought I was being nasty to her.  Otto scans and flags for the Y-word.

What I said was that because they are busy "punishing" the 20th century, most teens will not be curious about old classic movies unless they can retroactively make them "relevant" to their own Woke issues--Search the YouTube reactor-verse, and you'll see a HS/college fan preoccupation with "12 Angry Men" (in which a mean old white older guy is shunned and cancelled by his more tolerant peers for trying to falsely convict an ethnic teen over his own issues about young people), "Gaslight" ("That's the movie that invented the word about what your boyfriend is probably doing to you!"), "Imitation of Life" (for its "examination of biracial identity"), and Blazing Saddles, but ONLY the scene where the new sheriff arrives in town!  

That's because Millennials are so busy being persecuted, they don't have time to understand "Entertainment".  They do have an inexplicably unhealthy preoccupation with Arsenic & Old Lace, but that's probably caused by high-school drama clubs.

23 minutes ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

And my response is, so what if "nobody" bothers with old movies?

Then, they will DISAPPEAR.  Like culture disappears.

 Like most of silent cinema disappeared, after 30's Hollywood decided nobody wanted to "bother" with preserving it.

And, unlike the current studio system, where studios believe that "nobody bothers" with Blu-ray, there will be no underground third-party movement to save it from its own owners' neglect, in case someone a few generations later wants to dig it up again.

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4 minutes ago, EricJ said:

Then, they will DISAPPEAR.  Like culture disappears.

 Like most of silent cinema disappeared, after 30's Hollywood decided nobody wanted to "bother" with preserving it.

And, unlike the current studio system, where studios believe that "nobody bothers" with Blu-ray, there will be no underground third-party movement to save it from its own owners' neglect.  

(Gasp!)

The circle of life . . . which is ever-changing, ever-evolving, and ever-renewing.

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15 minutes ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

The circle of life . . . which is ever-changing, ever-evolving, and ever-renewing.

Yep:  We ALREADY have a generation that will literally put The Lion King on the list of 100 Greatest American Movies Ever Made.  

If not the top.  

Out of the 12 or so that they know.

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