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Debbie Reynolds' former cottage-style home in LA's San Fernando Valley up for sale for $2.1M

Debbie Reynolds' former cottage-style home in LA's San Fernando Valley up for sale for

A home previously owned by late Hollywood icon Debbie Reynolds is up for sale. The 3-bedroom, 3-bathroom cottage-style residence in the Valley Village neighborhood of L.A.'s San Fernando Valley, which was bought by Reynolds for $220,000 in 1987, has been put on the market for $2.1 million, according to The Dirt.  Reynolds' estate sold the property in the spring of 2019, two-and-a-half years after her death, for $1.113 million, and after some upgrades it was sold again, just months later, for about $1.85 million to actors Amanda Fuller and husband Matthew Bryan Feld.

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Are Catherine Zeta-Jones and Michael Douglas set to snap up £9.75million home near Harrods? Couple who've already amassed a huge worldwide property empire are now 'seeking a bolthole in London'

Are Catherine Zeta-Jones and Michael Douglas set to snap up £9.75million home near

Catherine Zeta-Jones, 52, (Pictured left) and Michael Douglas, 77, (Bottom left) appear to be seeking a bolthole in London, just around the corner from Harrods after they were pictured leaving a Knightsbridge townhouse. The Oscar-winning couple, who share a birthday, have bought and sold several homes. The pair own a mansion overlooking the Lighthouse in Mumbles, Swansea (Top middle) and are thought to own a 12,000sq ft manor house in Irvington, New York, bought for £3.6 million in 2019 - with an indoor pool and sprawling gardens (bottom middle). The Oscar-winning couple's Villa S'Estaca in Mallorca was put on the market for £26 million (Top right) in 2014 and Ms Zeta-Jones's childhood home, in the Mayals suburb, went on the market for £475,000 in 2006 (Bottom right).

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3 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Are Catherine Zeta-Jones and Michael Douglas set to snap up £9.75million home near Harrods? Couple who've already amassed a huge worldwide property empire are now 'seeking a bolthole in London'

Are Catherine Zeta-Jones and Michael Douglas set to snap up £9.75million home near

Catherine Zeta-Jones, 52, (Pictured left) and Michael Douglas, 77, (Bottom left) appear to be seeking a bolthole in London, just around the corner from Harrods after they were pictured leaving a Knightsbridge townhouse. The Oscar-winning couple, who share a birthday, have bought and sold several homes. The pair own a mansion overlooking the Lighthouse in Mumbles, Swansea (Top middle) and are thought to own a 12,000sq ft manor house in Irvington, New York, bought for £3.6 million in 2019 - with an indoor pool and sprawling gardens (bottom middle). The Oscar-winning couple's Villa S'Estaca in Mallorca was put on the market for £26 million (Top right) in 2014 and Ms Zeta-Jones's childhood home, in the Mayals suburb, went on the market for £475,000 in 2006 (Bottom right).

Poor little rich folks!  Rumored to also own (or previously owned) a large estate in Bermuda as well.  And, you're not supposed to be able to own property in Bermuda unless you are a native Bermudian but . . . you know . . . money talks!

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Bing Crosby's sprawling custom-built California mansion - which boasted guests such as JFK and Marilyn Monroe - hits the market for $4.5 million

Bing Crosby's sprawling mansion in Rancho Mirage, California hits the market for $4.5

Bing Crosby's former mansion located in sunny Rancho Mirage, California is hitting the market for a whopping $4.5 million in a listing by David Emerson and Alexandra Trejo of Compass. Nestled in the exclusive neighborhood of Thunderbird Heights, the 6,700-square-foot estate famously features a 'JFK Wing' that was allegedly frequented by late president John F. Kennedy and late Hollywood icon Marilyn Monroe. Crosby, who is considered one of the greatest entertainers of all time, built the single-story abode back in the 1950s, as reported by the Wall Street Journal.

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  It was fifty years ago on this date that the Bucks stopped there in Milwaukee for the streaking Los Angeles Lakers at a still-NBA record 33 games.

  It  was the second one-season wonder that had been centered by Wilt Chamberlain...

 Following that so foul and fair a road trip, basketball's superman returned to his Fortress of Solitude in Bel-Air, a resemble of a Frank Lloyd Wright design:

                   maxresdefault.jpg

Mere mortals such as myself could gaze at up the architectural extravagance on high from certain parts of the Valley.

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On 1/9/2022 at 12:07 PM, NoShear said:

basketball's superman returned to his Fortress of Solitude in Bel-Air, a resemble of a Frank Lloyd Wright design:

Your flowery verbiage confuses me. Are you saying this is Wilt Chamberlain's home?

While I'm not a big Wright fan, I do know he'd never design anything with those big ugly buttresses dominating the exterior. Nor does any high level "artiste" architect design anything with vinyl siding. Plebeian.

I'm also a bit shocked about Debbie Reynolds' home being sold. From watching Debbie & Carrie's last HBO special, seemed like their houses were adjoining, possibly on one piece of property? Or maybe two separate houses on adjacent property? Maybe Billie lives in her Mom's house & Todd sold his Mom's. They sure were chock full of STUFF!

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3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Re: "Your flowery verbiage confuses me. Are you saying this is Wilt Chamberlain's home?

While I'm not a big Wright fan, I do know he'd never design anything with those big ugly buttresses dominating the exterior. Nor does any high level "artiste" architect design anything with vinyl siding. Plebeian."

 It was Wilt Chamberlain's home. To this casual eye, the home seems to have borrowed from a Frank Lloyd Wright nature insert and, indeed, its architect is said to have been partly inspired by Wright. 

  

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Your flowery verbiage confuses me. Are you saying this is Wilt Chamberlain's home?

While I'm not a big Wright fan, I do know he'd never design anything with those big ugly buttresses dominating the exterior. Nor does any high level "artiste" architect design anything with vinyl siding. Plebeian.

I'm also a bit shocked about Debbie Reynolds' home being sold. From watching Debbie & Carrie's last HBO special, seemed like their houses were adjoining, possibly on one piece of property? Or maybe two separate houses on adjacent property? Maybe Billie lives in her Mom's house & Todd sold his Mom's. They sure were chock full of STUFF!

There's two different Debbie Reynolds houses in play here.

Billie Lourd is renovating (might be done by now, as she started it in 2020) both Reynolds' and Fisher's houses and combining them into a single estate.   These houses are in Beverly Hills.

The former Reynolds house that just sold is in the San Fernando valley.

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Kirk Douglas' Beverly Hills home complete with his very own Hollywood Walk of Fame is bought by orthopedic surgeon for $9 million - $1.52 million over the asking price

Kirk Douglas' iconic Beverly Hills home is bought by orthopedic surgeon for $9.015 million

Late actor Kirk Douglas' Beverly Hills home has been sold for $9.015 million, $1.52 million over the asking price, to orthopedic surgeon Dr. Stephen Liu. Real estate agent Rochelle Maize of Nourmand & Associates told The Wall Street Journal that an 'unheard of' 31 offers were put in for the late Spartacus actor's home, which went on the market in December for $7.495 million. 'We typically get four to five offers at this price point,' Maize told the publication. 'Usually this type of activity is reserved for a $1 million property.'

 
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Full House creator Jeff Franklin is selling his Beverly Hills mansion for $85 MILLION which was built on the site of house where Sharon Tate and four others were murdered by the Manson Family

Full House creator Jeff Franklin lists Beverly Hills home for $85 MILLION

Full House creator Jeff Franklin has put his massive Beverly Hills mansion on the market for a whopping $85 million. The 66-year-old filmmaker and screenwriter's plans for a big move were shared by real estate sources with TMZ on Wednesday. The property has a gruesome history, as the mansion was built on the site where Sharon Tate and four friends were brutally murdered by followers of Charles Manson in 1969.

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Why do these people need such enormous square footage? In the early days, Hollywood's successful would bring their family out to CA to support them (in return for supporting their career) Stars often shared their wealth by welcoming struggling colleagues to stay for extended periods, needing extra rooms & space.

Nowadays it's everyone out for themselves, everyone needs "privacy" & won't tolerate others. Seems crazy for anyone to have a house that size. 

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Why do these people need such enormous square footage? In the early days, Hollywood's successful would bring their family out to CA to support them (in return for supporting their career) Stars often shared their wealth by welcoming struggling colleagues to stay for extended periods, needing extra rooms & space.

Nowadays it's everyone out for themselves, everyone needs "privacy" & won't tolerate others. Seems crazy for anyone to have a house that size. 

Same reason the landed gentry built huge houses: to project an image and stroke their ego.   This is nothing new, really.  Some celebrities lived well but in more modest homes.   Others lived in mansions the equal of this thing (Harold Lloyd's Greenacres, Pickfair, etc).  Lloyd's estate was large enough that a portion of it was subdivided into 14 large lots, while the original house was retained on 5 acres.

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5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Why do these people need such enormous square footage?

A person's perception of time is linked to available space. Workers in cubicles and executives in corner offices have significantly different experiences with elapsed time.

Most people find that time seems to go slower in large rooms. This has a generally relaxing effect. The hub-bub of life seems lessened. People/problems/situations with which you must deal are both literally and metaphorically distanced.

A common anecdote is that a house with many small rooms makes people feel as if they are trapped in a rat's maze while a house of the same square footage but few distinct rooms makes people feel as if they are exploring a world.

This alteration in time perception is a driving force in the "open floorplan" design craze. The innate sense that much could be happening in such a large space but it is not happening and is not crowded leads to a sense that the world is leaving you alone for a while.

This study: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29684246/ is interesting as it presents this alteration of time perception as a map onto which waypoints and new routes can be pinned. I find it a better source of information on this matter as it does not focus on one aspect of the effect but treats the entire topic as a whole in order to provide a  background for their information.

People have long known that perceived time can have little relation to real time. I believe the standard is: "One minute with your hand on a hot stove feels like hours while an hour sitting with a pretty girl feels like a minute."

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46 minutes ago, SansFin said:

This alteration in time perception is a driving force in the "open floorplan" design craze.

While I appreciate your thoughtfully expressed points, I also know the popularity of "open floor plan" had been overblown/exploited by home remodeling shows. I prefer having large windows to bring outdoors indoors for expansive vista from a small cozy room. Small rooms are easier to keep a comfortable temperature, no small feat in a 100 year old home!

Small homes cut down on unnecessary "stuff" too and am forever amazed by the plethora of rented storage units all across America. Although I once witnessed a guy precisely backing his classic car into one for winter storage!

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41 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Small homes cut down on unnecessary "stuff" too and am forever amazed by the plethora of rented storage units all across America. Although I once witnessed a guy precisely backing his classic car into one for winter storage!

Please do not dis storage units.

We made an offer on a house nearly three years ago. We rented a storage unit near it to facilitate the move so that we could take items not immediately needed because we were making many trips to finalize the purchase and wished to make best use of the time. That then fell through. We continued to take goods to that unit when looking for other homes in that area in hopes of reducing the size of the U-Haul truck which we would eventually have to rent. 

We rented also a storage unit locally because we anticipated that any eventual move would be faster and easier if done from a storage unit with a wide door rather than coping with the tight zig-zag path out of the apartment dozens of times on one day. It allowed us also to stage the goods by immediate need and method by which they can be transported. That storage unit mostly contains items which we did not absolutely need on a daily basis but would need to access at intervals.

We have at last found and purchased a house suitable for us. We have now some of our goods with us and some goods in a storage unit four hours north and some goods in a storage unit eight hours southeast. We have only a general idea of what is where.

It does not help that we are moving from two-thousand square foot apartment to twelve-hundred square foot house. 

Storage units are allowing us to determine how much and when to bring our goods into our new home so that we can take time to find best place for each item rather than being in a rush to just jam things where they will fit in order to clear the maze of boxes.

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17 hours ago, SansFin said:

Please do not dis storage units.

Sorry, didn't mean to be a personal slight. Like the guy who uses it as a garage, a storage unit can be a great help, especially for those moving, like yourself.

Some friends of mine who were moving near Christmas time sent a card of a photo of them standing in front of a P.O.D. storage unit with a wreath hanging on it, "Merry Christmas from our home to yours!" Cute!

After dismantling a Lustron house, stored it in a 53' tractor trailer. When I sold it to someone in Tennessee, all they had to do was hire a truck driver to hook it up & move it. I bought an entire carousel stored in a trailer & it was parked for years before it was bought & reassembled. But that's my business.

I'm just amazed at how many storage unit neighborhoods there are and there is such a need for long term storage of personal, household items. 

 

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I suggested early that we buy a small shipping container so that we could load locally and then have it moved to new location with no fuss. My little fuzzy nixed the idea because he has a fear of such containers and of storage in trailers. 

Do you know what is a: "pivot irrigation system"? They are a long pipe supported by towers mounted on wheels. One end is anchored in the middle of a field and the wheels are powered to sweep the pipe over the field in a circle. Sprinkler heads on the pipe water the crop.

My little fuzzy needed a fulltime day job early in his career and worked as an engineer for a company which manufactured such systems. Sales were seasonal but the company kept full staff year-around by manufacturing their standard models and placing them on semi-trailers. One trailer=one complete system. Each was worth several years' wages for an average person.

They noticed one day that some were missing. Investigation showed that the only control was that a truck driver have a single piece of paper to enter the storage yard and could then hook up to and drive out with whatever they wished. Records analysis showed that more than ten percent of their inventory was gone. It was believed to be an: "inside job" because the thefts stopped immediately upon discovery with no public awareness of the situation. The company very nearly went bankrupt and had to divest itself of most office personnel including all of research and development because the banks pulled all loans which had inventory as collateral. They needed years to recover.

A major company was renovating a newly-purchased building. The entire electronic infrastructure from telephone system to telex equipment to mainframe computer and terminal system were being removed with intention to determine what should be reinstalled according to a new plan and what should be sold as valuable scrap. The contractor hired for the removal stored the items in trailers on site. They assumed the owning company was moving some of it to a different location to free working space when the containers began disappearing and did not report it. Final analysis showed that nearly a million dollars worth of equipment had been stolen over the course of months. This was in the mid-1970s when that was considered a respectable amount of money.

These and other incidents of similar nature gave my little fuzzy an abiding fear of storage systems which might with ease go wandering. 

I have spoken with the owner/manager of the facility where we have one unit. He has said that most people indicate that they will need storage space for a short time only but that most often becomes years. He has a number of units which have not been opened in more than a decade. 

 

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1 hour ago, SansFin said:

He has a number of units which have not been opened in more than a decade. 

As always, informative & entertaining post, Sans. I knew immediately what irrigators you were describing because I enjoy seeing the crop circle patterns they make from a sky view.

I've come away with a couple of amazing scores from a storage cube sales for practically nothing. Amazing to think some old cubicles may be time capsules. In reality, the market for antiques is at an all time low. Sad because many things are superior to what's built today both in materials & workmanship. But I also find it refreshing that youngsters have little interest in amassing any huge collections as the Boomers did. 

I am currently painting a beautiful old carousel piece that is for sale for a fraction of what he sold for in the crazy '90's.  

272005661_376219540973039_47765830227196

I always dream about finding a "holy grail" sort of great American artifact like this squirreled away somewhere...like among the crates in Kane's basement.

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6 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

As always, informative & entertaining post, Sans.

 

I do apologize. I had noticed a distinct waning of fluency in my spontaneous posts and so my New Year regimen is to write at least an hour each day in an informal but correct manner. I have inflicted these writings on those in several threads here because this is the sole English-only forum which I visit regularly. I will try to find a more appropriate outlet for my meanderings.

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9 hours ago, SansFin said:

I do apologize. (snipped) I will try to find a more appropriate outlet for my meanderings.

Whaaa?  Did you think I was in any way insulting or disrespecting your writing abilities? 🤦‍♀️

Oh contraire, I was commenting that all of your posts are well thought out, intelligently written & informative.  I always learn something or see another point of view from your posts & never skim past them. (& miss your Mr here too)

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Richard Gere places his palatial 11,600-square foot mansion sitting on 50 acres of land in upstate New York on the market for $28 million

Richard Gere places his 11,600-square foot mansion in upstate New York on the market for

Richard Gere has placed his spacious estate in upstate New York on the market for $28 million. The news about the 72-year-old actor's property was initially reported by The Dirt, who noted that the performer had lived in the palatial Pound Ridge mansion for over two decades. The media outlet also reported that the residence, with its listing being held by Muffin Dowdle of Ginnel Real Estate, tallies up to $220,000 a year in taxes.

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On 1/22/2022 at 7:19 AM, TikiSoo said:

Whaaa?  Did you think I was in any way insulting or disrespecting your writing abilities? 🤦‍♀️

 

I would never suspect you of malicious intent.

Your comment reminded me that I was posting for intent other than contributing to the topic of the thread. I feel strongly that asides are a natural and welcome part of any thread but there is a line between interesting tangent and subverting the thread. I wish to never cross that line.

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8 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Richard Gere has placed his spacious estate in upstate New York

That's not upstate NY....both the Gere & the Baldwin families are from my neck of the woods, CNY......way upstate. Adrian Brody just moved here too, hope to bump into him someday.

winter.png

It's a great place to live if you like watching lots of old movies!

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Catherine Zeta-Jones and husband Michael Douglas SLASH price on their expansive New York City apartment by $2 million after originally listing for $21.5 million

Catherine Zeta-Jones and husband Michael Douglas SLASH price on their NYC apartment by

Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta-Jones have slashed the price on their lavish New York apartment, which they'd listed over the summer for $21.5million. According to Dirt.com, the longtime couple's property is now on the market for $2million less than their initial asking price, bringing it down to $19.5million. The expansive four-bedroom, five-and-a-half bathroom penthouse home was designed by Thierry Despont and offers sweeping city views overlooking Central Park West.

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Must have been a big ordeal for Michael to lower the price by $2 millions,(they are selling a lot of properties in the last 2 years for big money) I remember    Spy Magazine sent  a bunch of checks to various rich celebrities, reducing the amount each time they cashed one and sending another one lower than the previous one,it  was in the early 90's Douglas was a runner up cashing in person a check for $1.16 or around this amount,they started with a first check of $20,Trump was tied with cashing a check of 0.13 cents, the ultimate winner at the time the checks were signed and cashed. I found a link but it is not as complete as what i had read then. https://www.googleFspy-catches-trump-in-search-for-cheapskates

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