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What causes you to delay watching a classic film that everyone else has seen?


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39 minutes ago, MovieCollectorOH said:

For my scheduling purposes, the one or two sentence plot description and genre are good for me. 

Not sure exactly what you mean by "scheduling purposes," an activity no doubt that you do, but anyway, this is what I do when looking at a blurb. Netflix is terrible at giving away things so I read with great caution "one or two sentence" of the description to perhaps get an idea. We learn of a movie that the young woman must decide what to do after becoming pregnant (without a husband) and we watch the movie and find that she discovers she is pregnant 15 minutes before the movie is over. Can you imagine that? I didn't make it up. Knowing too much about a movie means why bother.

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26 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Sometimes I over-hype a movie in my mind and for fear of being disappointed, put off viewing it for weeks... until I finally crack like a walnut and sit down to watch it. One of the most recent examples was with Citizen Kane... and I decidedly did not have a good time. So I guess sometimes my phobia is rational. 

That's actually quite interesting. 

I don't always expect to have a "good time" when watching a movie because some movies-- like Peter Greenaway's films-- are not designed for viewers to exactly have a great time. But I still try to find value in what I'm watching.

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Just now, TopBilled said:

That's actually quite interesting. 

I don't always expect to have a "good time" when watching a movie because some movies-- like Peter Greenaway's films-- are not designed for viewers to exactly have a great time. But I still try to find value in what I'm watching.

yeah my brain is interesting alright lol... I think I do a lot better when I just decide to watch something without much prior knowledge of it or when I haven't seen anything my friends have written about it. 

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I have to be in a mood to deal with the subject matter. Some films, (like Schindler's List), I will probably never watch. Others, (like To Kill A Mockingbird), I doubt I'll want to sit through when there's literally thousands of other films I could be watching. Basically, the heavier the story, the more I would put off watching it.

Then I prefer the setting to be right. For example, I would rarely watch a noir in the morning or mid day. I would rather watch that or a horror movie at night to enhance the effect. Or a movie about a cold and windy day and its hot and sunny outside would not work for me.

I try not to let the overhype or critics bother me. Too many times , there are other factors that lead to a negative review. Factors that I don't deem important.

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Just now, GGGGerald said:

I have to be in a mood to deal with the subject matter. Some films, (like Schindler's List), I will probably never watch. Others, (like To Kill A Mockingbird), I doubt I'll want to sit through when there's literally thousands of other films I could be watching. Basically, the heavier the story, the more I would put off watching it.

Then I prefer the setting to be right. For example, I would rarely watch a noir in the morning or mid day. I would rather watch that or a horror movie at night to enhance the effect. Or a movie about a cold and windy day and its hot and sunny outside would not work for me.

I try not to let the overhype or critics bother me. Too many times , there are other factors that lead to a negative review. Factors that I don't deem important.

I agree! I love watching noir/horror at night. When I watched The Haunting (1963) I did so on a gloomy day and I found myself really immersed in the film. 

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51 minutes ago, sagebrush said:

For me, it's usually the length of film which will delay my willingness to watch it. I get distracted easily! 😄

 

LOL

Who's a good boy. Who's a good boy. YOU'RE a good boy sagebrush, ahem, I mean Dug.

tumblr_mef4qwsLtT1rx4kgro1_500.gif&ehk=o

Btw, he's getting his own TV series on Disney+ starting in a couple of weeks.

(...just thought ya might wanna know)

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27 minutes ago, laffite said:

Not sure exactly what you mean by "scheduling purposes," an activity no doubt that you do, but anyway, this is what I do when looking at a blurb. Netflix is terrible at giving away things so I read with great caution "one or two sentence" of the description to perhaps get an idea. We learn of a movie that the young woman must decide what to do after becoming pregnant (without a husband) and we watch the movie and find that she discovers she is pregnant 15 minutes before the movie is over. Can you imagine that? I didn't make it up. Knowing too much about a movie means why bother.

Yeah, I'm in the same mindset lately.

By scheduling, I mostly record first, then watch later.  Just seeing a plot at face value in one or two sentences.  In other words, just the type of movie, not the details.  Just the data from the on-screen guide on TV is usually sufficient as to whether or not I want to record it.  I can determine whether or not I like it later on when I watch it.  I didn't realize you were talking about Netflix, sounds like a different scenario.

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49 minutes ago, MovieCollectorOH said:

Yeah, I'm in the same mindset lately.

By scheduling, I mostly record first, then watch later.  Just seeing a plot at face value in one or two sentences.  In other words, just the type of movie, not the details.  Just the data from the on-screen guide on TV is usually sufficient as to whether or not I want to record it.  I can determine whether or not I like it later on when I watch it.  I didn't realize you were talking about Netflix, sounds like a different scenario.

I think we are basically talking about the same thing. I use the one or two sentence scenario all the time. Netflix was just an example, if you go beyond the two sentence limit.

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If a film has an over-bearing political agenda, i'll tend to skip it, no matter how great people may claim it is (IMO people only call it great if they agree with the agenda).

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7 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

If a film has an over-bearing political agenda, i'll tend to skip it, no matter how great people may claim it is (IMO people only call it great if they agree with the agenda).

And that is often how Best Picture Oscar winners are chosen.

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Often length and subject matter.  If a  movie is over 2 hours, I'm often more hesitant to commit.  Also, if a film is depressing, probably why I've never watched Schindler's List  in its entirety.   

 That being said, I've watch The Best Years of Our Lives about 50 times.  It will be on and I'll say, "I'll just sit through the scene when..." and end up watching the whole thing.

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3 hours ago, rosebette said:

Often length and subject matter.  If a  movie is over 2 hours, I'm often more hesitant to commit.  Also, if a film is depressing, probably why I've never watched Schindler's List  in its entirety.   

This is where I think those cheap poverty row films from the 1940s have an advantage. They're short, and they are never depressing. The bad guys (typically gangsters and Nazis) don't succeed and there's always a happy ending.

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Length has nothing to do with it for me.  Unless a movie is scheduled what might be too late in the evening for me.  And the idea here is discussing what delays our watching a classic movie, not what causes us to keep from watching or wanting to watch some particular classic movie.   Like Top's "delay" in not getting around to watch THE BIG COUNTRY.......

I don't recall Top ever claiming a dislike for the Western genre.   Or a dislike for Charlton Heston, Gregory Peck, Charles Bickford or Jean Simmons.

And it can't be the length, as I don't seem to recall that complaint from him about LAWRENCE OF ARABIA and other "epics" of similar length.  

So, level with us Top......

Is it unavoidable delay....    or some other kind of personal hesitation.?   You know, there's really nothing to be afraid of about the movie.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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I am a huge fan of the western genre. I've created several threads in the westerns genre sub-forum on this website.

I also like soap operas, so THE BIG COUNTRY seems like something I would probably enjoy. It's just that the long running time puts me off right now. It is probably something that I will have to devote a whole afternoon to watching.

I know I will eventually get around to it.

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Y'know, I don't get the "soap opera" thing  people said about this movie.  It would seem the same claim could be made about a good 95% of the "classic" collection.   And as far as that goes, I'd say DOCTOR ZHIVAGO is WAY more "soap opera" than "The Big Country",   And how many times HAVE you seen Zhivago?

And how THEN did you ever find the time?  :mellow:;) 

Sepiatone

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8 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Y'know, I don't get the "soap opera" thing  people said about this movie.  It would seem the same claim could be made about a good 95% of the "classic" collection.   And as far as that goes, I'd say DOCTOR ZHIVAGO is WAY more "soap opera" than "The Big Country",   And how many times HAVE you seen Zhivago?

And how THEN did you ever find the time?  :mellow:;) 

Sepiatone

Actually I haven't seen DOCTOR ZHIVAGO either!

***

Re: soaps. I love soaps. So when people apply the term soap opera to a classic film in a negative sense, it doesn't dissuade me from watching. 

I also like genre hybrids. So combining melodrama with police procedurals or combining melodrama with westerns, I am okay with that.

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Can someone tell me what today qualifies as a classic film?  Certainly, not everything they have shown on TCM qualifies as a "classic."

Re:  length - Sometimes, I realize that the film version of a musical is way too long or that the non-musical version is better.  Gigi and My Fair Lady are very similar.

Bonfire of the Vanities is not a "classic."  Neither are some of the neo noir films.

I read the book and saw Dr. Zhivago - it more than just a love story.

So many interesting comments.  The Haunting is a psychological horror film (don't want to give away spoilers), as is The Innocents (with Deborah Kerr).

Sorry for sounding so convoluted.

 

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55 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Can someone tell me what today qualifies as a classic film?  Certainly, not everything they have shown on TCM qualifies as a "classic."

Re:  length - Sometimes, I realize that the film version of a musical is way too long or that the non-musical version is better.  Gigi and My Fair Lady are very similar.

Bonfire of the Vanities is not a "classic."  Neither are some of the neo noir films.

I read the book and saw Dr. Zhivago - it more than just a love story.

So many interesting comments.  The Haunting is a psychological horror film (don't want to give away spoilers), as is The Innocents (with Deborah Kerr).

Sorry for sounding so convoluted.

 

An excellent opinion offered up by JamesJazzGuitar on the “TooMany Recent Films this past month! thread on General Discussions back in December of 2020:
Note that the term "classic" has NO meaning.    NONE.   It is entirely subjective.    That was just a BS marketing Term TCM came up with for their branding  (since Turner American Studio-Era movies isn't as sound of a slogan as Turner CLASSIC movies).

Again,  the Studio-Era is from 1929 - 1968 (these years are subject to a lot of debate,  so this is just how I define them).

As for "classic";  there is NO fixed time period for what era of films are "classic".   SOME people define "classic" by how old;   To me this definition is bogus because TIME MARCHES ON.
E.g.  say ones says that for a film to be "classic" it has to be over 30 years old.    Take the films from the 80s;   back when TCM got started these were NOT 30s years old.  BUT they are TODAY.    So is it NOW OK for TCM to show films from the 80s?

American Studio Era films is more definitive.

This is still BOGUS as it relates to TCM's branding.   E.g.  serving as a standard of excellence : of recognized value classic literary works a classic case study on hysteria.

One can NOT define any movie as being "classic" using the above definition that isn't 100% subjective.     

Again,  TCM just used the term for marketing.   It has NO VALUE as it terms of what type of movies TCM would show and, what TCM was clearly marketing when they started as a network,  and what their mission-statement was,  is to show mostly American Studio-Era movies.   

E.g. the majority of films made in the 30s are cheap programmers;  B pictures,   Made to be seen once and never seen again.     Most hardly qualify as: serving as a standard of excellence.

 

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I can only speak for myself, but my definition of a classic is a movie that is so memorable, that can entertain you or make you think or both, and have lots of rewatchability to them.

Every decade has some gems that have this to offer, but every decade also has many forgettable clunkers in them.....as fxreyman pointed out, the 30's (as well as the 40's and even 50's and 60's) had  lots of B grade time passers good for a one time viewing only.

The quality of the movie is the most important to me as well, regardless of the film's length.

 

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5 hours ago, TopBilled said:

This is where I think those cheap poverty row films from the 1940s have an advantage. They're short, and they are never depressing. The bad guys (typically gangsters and Nazis) don't succeed and there's always a happy ending.

This is often why hubs and I choose Warner's precodes.  We've been bingeing on William Powell movies lately from Warners.  Snappy dialogue and over in under 70 minutes.

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Length has nothing to do with it for me.  Unless a movie is scheduled what might be too late in the evening for me.  And the idea here is discussing what delays our watching a classic movie, not what causes us to keep from watching or wanting to watch some particular classic movie.   Like Top's "delay" in not getting around to watch THE BIG COUNTRY.......

I don't recall Top ever claiming a dislike for the Western genre.   Or a dislike for Charlton Heston, Gregory Peck, Charles Bickford or Jean Simmons.

And it can't be the length, as I don't seem to recall that complaint from him about LAWRENCE OF ARABIA and other "epics" of similar length.  

So, level with us Top......

Is it unavoidable delay....    or some other kind of personal hesitation.?   You know, there's really nothing to be afraid of about the movie.  ;) 

Sepiatone

I've seen Lawrence of Arabia.  Once is enough.  My brother gave me the DVD on Blu-Ray -- it looks amazing, but I can watch 2 movies and Peter O'Toole's still in the **** in desert when I'm done.

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15 hours ago, rosebette said:

I've seen Lawrence of Arabia.  Once is enough.  My brother gave me the DVD on Blu-Ray -- it looks amazing, but I can watch 2 movies and Peter O'Toole's still in the **** in desert when I'm done.

Are you saying it's a chore to sit through? :) 

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I  may need to revise my qualifications for why I might not see a classic movie.  I just say through two films on TCM last night that are classics and violate my over 2-hour rule (also they have subtitles) -- The Last Spring (1949) and Early Summer (1951).  Slowly paced, intimate, and moving, well worth the time.  I'm going to watch Tokyo Story On Demand this week-end.

 

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Even before GWTW became non-PC (focused only on the portrayal of blacks rather Scarlett's rape scene), it is too depressing at the end.  In West Side Story, Officer Krupke was moved to the earlier part of the film, where, in the Broadway version, it is later (to lighten some of the frightening scenes - e.g. (spoiler), Anita's rape.  Excuse typos.

T.E. Lawrence was not a great guy, but Peter O'Toole is gorgeous and it has a great cast and a wonderful soundtrack.  Plus a good director!

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1 hour ago, TopBilled said:

Are you saying it's a chore to sit through? :) 

I can get where she's coming from.  Long movies can sometimes seem like a chore to sit through.  But that's mostly for people who either don't like long movies for whatever reason( weak bladder/ short attention span/ other time constraints, etc.)  or are otherwise forced or wheedled into watching a long movie about a topic they don't care about.  One example can be really my really liking the movie GANDHI and wouldn't really mind it if it were even a bit longer, or my wife's outright thorough hatred of it regardless of it's original length or even if it was just a 90 minute presentation.    Then there are movies I feel would be better if some time was shaved off.  Like-----

THE DEER HUNTER:  pare 45 minutes from it and you'd still have a great movie.  ie:  We don't need all that footage of the carload of buddies taking off on one of them as he reaches the car door.  Six or seven times(I lost count). :huh:  And we also don't need to view almost the ENTIRE wedding reception, do we? :rolleyes:  But I'll wait until I actually SEE the movie before I determine it's too long for me to sit through which might also mean I won't bother with it again. 

Sepiatone

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