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"Teorema" (1969)


jaragon
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Terence Stamp ( in very tight pants) is a mysterious stranger that has very personal impact on a wealthy Italian family in Pier Paolo Pasolini's " Teorema".   Stamp angel/demon  drives the family both mad with lust and into religious ecstasy.   Pasolini was a cinematic poet and his movie is filled with haunting images and beautiful Italian youths  who seemed to have stepped out of a Caravagio painting.   You can see it on Amazon prime- I could not get the subtitles to work so I saw in Italian- but with film maker as visual as Pasolini it doesn't matter- you can enjoy intellectual stimulation and all those loving close ups of bulging trousers...

 

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15 hours ago, don96 said:

I really like this film.  Pasolini is in top form.  Reminds me in a vague way of Something for Everyone--the film with Angela Lansbury and Michael York.

I think that was a comedy version of the same plot

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17 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Thanks for mentioning this one!

I had seen it a long time ago and had forgotten most of it- well except for the floating maid!-  it is a fascinating movie which can be interpreted in many ways

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32 minutes ago, jaragon said:

I had seen it a long time ago and had forgotten most of it- well except for the floating maid!-  it is a fascinating movie which can be interpreted in many ways

I've been reading up on the director. I'd never heard of him before. He has an interesting filmography, and his personal life was very dramatic.

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3 hours ago, TopBilled said:

I've been reading up on the director. I'd never heard of him before. He has an interesting filmography, and his personal life was very dramatic.

Pasolini had a very dramatic end to say the least and made some beautiful and disturbing cinema...

 

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I think Pasolini's Salo: 120 Days of Sodom is a great film, though certainly horrifying. I love the ending, with the two boys dancing. One of the great endings of a bizarre film. (Scene begins around 1:13).

 

 

 

 

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15 hours ago, jaragon said:

Young Terence Stamp could have seduced anyone into doing anything...

 

He could fit into just about any style of moviemaking. The youngest shots reminded me of the young Richard Burton, though I don't think he looked much like Richard as an adult. (He was one of those rare people who seemed to look only like himself.) I first saw him as Billy Budd and was smitten forever.

You were right about those pants in the preview. Even when he wasn't in them they seemed to have pride of place as Sylvana Magnano touched them so lovingly. To my mind Terrence Stamp was the male who made the "sexual revolution" seem real and Teorema was one of the ways he did it.

The quick screen shot from The Collector reminded me that it hasn't been around much at all. I think TCM showed it way back when but I'd love to get another look at it, though it's probably ripe for being "cancelled" these days. Also, the shot with the divine Monica Vitti reminded me that Modesty Blaise has been off the radar for a while too. They were both something to look at in that one, though the movie itself is pretty silly.

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16 hours ago, Swithin said:

I think Pasolini's Salo: 120 Days of Sodom is a great film, though certainly horrifying. I love the ending, with the two boys dancing. One of the great endings of a bizarre film. (Scene begins around 1:13).

 

 

 

 

It's too bad that Pasonlini last film was disturbing film who knows what else he would have created

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3 hours ago, DougieB said:

He could fit into just about any style of moviemaking. The youngest shots reminded me of the young Richard Burton, though I don't think he looked much like Richard as an adult. (He was one of those rare people who seemed to look only like himself.) I first saw him as Billy Budd and was smitten forever.

You were right about those pants in the preview. Even when he wasn't in them they seemed to have pride of place as Sylvana Magnano touched them so lovingly. To my mind Terrence Stamp was the male who made the "sexual revolution" seem real and Teorema was one of the ways he did it.

The quick screen shot from The Collector reminded me that it hasn't been around much at all. I think TCM showed it way back when but I'd love to get another look at it, though it's probably ripe for being "cancelled" these days. Also, the shot with the divine Monica Vitti reminded me that Modesty Blaise has been off the radar for a while too. They were both something to look at in that one, though the movie itself is pretty silly.

   Stamp was very sexy one could stare into those blue eyes for ever.  He is perfectly cast in "Teorama". There is a ceartain sexual ambiguity about him but he seems to like women. Stamp received extensive media coverage of his romances in the 1960s with film star Julie Christie and supermodel Jean Shrimpton. He and Shrimpton were one of the most-photographed couples of Mod London

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5 hours ago, jaragon said:

   Stamp was very sexy one could stare into those blue eyes for ever.  He is perfectly cast in "Teorama". There is a ceartain sexual ambiguity about him but he seems to like women. Stamp received extensive media coverage of his romances in the 1960s with film star Julie Christie and supermodel Jean Shrimpton. He and Shrimpton were one of the most-photographed couples of Mod London

 

Terence Stamp Art Print by Central PressW

With Celia Hammond at a 1967 premiere of Far From the Madding Crowd..

Fast forward 30 years or so...

The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994)

 

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