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I wish I knew what you mean when you say "fun" western.

I think Unforgiven is the best western ever made - but as one poster noted, it's not a fun-themed western in any respect. Brutal realism is its calling card.

But I sure had a great time watching it - so, for me, its uber-fun.

And then there's the Cat Ballou type of westerns that really are intended as fun. One good one I liked a lot is Waterhole #3 (1967). Stars Mag 7 alumni James Coburn. Also stars Carroll O'Connor.

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Probably considered a "fun" western would be Silverado (1985). I remember it being much-hyped at the time as the western that would bring back westerns.

It was a star-laden conglomeration of its day (Kevin Costner, Danny Glover, Scott Glenn, Jeff Goldblum, Kevin Kline, Rosanna Arquette, Linda Hunt, John Cleese, Brian Dennehy, Jeff Fahey, Richard Jenkins).

Personally, I found it very ordinary - not engrossing, really.

But, I think a lot of others liked it.

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11 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Hateful Eight is one of my favorite movies of the 21st Century!!

I didn't dislike this film, but with someone who is known for their writing, i was actually expecting more from Tarantino with the story.  I haven't watched the 4 hour cut yet.  Will one day.  Have you seen both and can you compare them at all for me?

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If(as one here claimed) you can't go wrong with Henry Fonda, then there's THE TIN STAR('57)   and for a fun one....

THE CHEYENNE SOCIAL CLUB('70) with old pal Jimmy Stewart  and not a Fonda film, but....

THE CULPEPPER CATTLE CO.('72) is an OK one.

ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST ('69) is another Fonda western not to be overlooked.  It also stars Charles Bronson who also stars in 

BREAKHEART PASS('75)

Sepiatone

 

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Will Penny (1968) is a sober, realistic portrait of a loner cowhand with limited options who encounters a widow and her child, coming to gradually experience the first serious relationship in his middle years. The film features Charlton Heston in one of his best performances, and Joan Hackett is just fine as the woman.

DOWNLOAD: Will Penny 1967 Full Movie .Mp4 & MP3, 3gp | NaijaGreenMovies,  Fzmovies, NetNaija

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2 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Will Penny (1968) is a sober, realistic portrait of a loner cowhand with limited options who encounters a widow and her child, coming to gradually experience the first serious relationship in his middle years. The film features Charlton Heston in one of his best performances, and Joan Hackett is just fine as the woman.

DOWNLOAD: Will Penny 1967 Full Movie .Mp4 & MP3, 3gp | NaijaGreenMovies,  Fzmovies, NetNaija

Agreed, this was definitely one of Heston's finest performances.

A definite must see for those who claim that Heston was too 'hammy' in his acting style. Not here IMO.

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Cecil B. DeMille's larger than life tapestries of the American frontier made for some large scale fun, even if the hokiness often involving some corny dialogue and stereotypical characterizations means you don't take them too seriously.

The Plainsman (1936), with Gary Cooper giving a flavourable performance as Wild Bill Hickok, along with Jean Arthur as Calamity Jane.

The Plainsman – Cecil B. DeMille

Union Pacific (1939), probably the most lavish of the many westerns released in its year, about the epic (if overlong) building of the title railway, featuring Joel McCrea in one of his earliest western roles, along with Barbara Stanwyck sporting an Irish accent.

Amazon.com: Union Pacific (1939) : Joel McCrea, Barbara Stanwyck, Cecil B.  DeMille: Movies & TV

North West Mounted Police (1940), a fanciful (highly fanciful) take on the Riel Rebellion in Canada, featuring Gary Cooper as a Texas Ranger, Preston Foster and Robert Preston as Mounties, Paulette Goddard as a tempestuous half breed. This film has particularly outrageous dialogue, at times. At one point, for instance, Akim Tamiroff, playing a fur trapper who has been fatally shot, intones, "The Big Trapper got me by the neck." This was the director's first film using Technicolor.

North West Mounted Police (1940) Cecil B. DeMille, Gary Cooper, Madeleine  Carroll, Paulette Goddard, Action, Adventure, Drama, History, Romance,  Western | RareFilm

Unconquered (1947) set during the colonial French and Indian wars, features Gary Cooper as a frontiersman, Paulette Goddard as an indentured servant he spends half the film rescuing, and Boris Karloff as a campy Indian chief. The stereotyping of Indians as blood thirsty savages is particularly outrageous here but the film is a fun, atmospheric adventure, with some impressive special effects, including an Indian attack on Fort Pitt (in which the Indians use their canoes as ladders to try to scale the walls) and a wild canoe flight by the hero and heroine from Indians in a rapid filled river with a waterfalls awaiting them after the rapids.

Unconquered (1947) - Photo Gallery - IMDb

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Unless I've somehow overlooked their mention earlier, here's two more starring that other icon of the western genre, Gary Cooper, for consideration here. Both are excellent.

OIP.KFJbvCkkoJgr78qUGRdWNAHaLN?pid=ImgDe 

(1940) Coop and Walter Brennan are terrific as the best of frenemies in this one.

 

Motw1958.jpg  

Coop's pentultimate western (1958) directed by Anthony Mann, and once again containing elements of a noir.

 

 

 

 

 

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My favorite western set comedy is Along Came Jones with Cary Cooper,  Loretta Young and Dan Duryea (as the bad guy who is the only one that plays it straight).

Cooper and Young have good chemistry and Cooper is great at spoofing the type of western man persona he established with films like The Westerner.

Amazon.com: Along Came Jones : Gary Cooper, Loretta Young, William  Demarest, Dan Duryea, Frank Sully, Don Costello, Walter Sande, Russell  Simpson, Arthur Loft, Willard Robertson, Ray Teal, Lane Chandler, Milton R.  Krasner,Along Came Jones - Classic Movie Masterpiece

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I shall cast my 2¢ worth in with BLACK NOON (1971-Tvm), a Western-Horror film aired by CBS in November of '71.  Has a good cast and at 73m. doesn't wear out its welcome.  I found it a lot of fun.  Maybe you will, too.  

Starring Ray Milland, Roy Thinnes, Yvette Mimieux, Lynn Loring, Gloria Grahame, Henry Silva and Hank Worden. 

Then there's the 1974 Western Tvm SHOOTOUT IN A ONE-DOG TOWN.  It may sound a bit like a 'Western comedy' -- but it is not.  Has quite a good cast.   

 

 

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33 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

There's a woman in The Westerner?

What, never heard of Lillie Langtry, sewhite?

(...although the one pictured in that poster up there is actress Doris Davenport, who plays a homesteader's daughter and love interest to Coop's character)

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3 minutes ago, Dargo said:

never heard of Lillie Langtry, sewhite?

I remember Walter Brennan's character was obsessed with her, and I think Gary Cooper tricked him into coming what was supposed to be a performance of hers, but I don't know that I actually remember her appearing. It's been 20 years since I've seen it, though.

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49 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

I remember Walter Brennan's character was obsessed with her, and I think Gary Cooper tricked him into coming what was supposed to be a performance of hers, but I don't know that I actually remember her appearing. It's been 20 years since I've seen it, though.

It's been quite a while since I've watched it too, but I'm pretty sure Brennan's Judge Bean meets her near the end of the film.

(...and I'm also pretty sure because the film's cast list includes the credit of actress Lillian Bond as Lillie Langtry)

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On 8/18/2021 at 3:49 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

Don't judge me, I needed a catchy title; I am really getting more into Westerns, and I wanted to ask you guys if there were any you've seen that you could recommend. A few of note that I have seen and enjoyed are Rio Bravo, The Big Country, True Grit (both), Once Upon a Time in the West, High Noon, and Stagecoach. Let me know if there are any you think I should try :) 

Since you've done both True Grits and Rio Bravo. I really liked The Cowboys (more John Wayne).

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Don't know if it's been mentioned, probably since you'd be hard pressed to find anyone not liking this one but I forgot to add The Magnificent Seven to my original list the other day, it's one of my favorites.

Another western that I like a lot is Little Big Man

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14 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Don't know if it's been mentioned, probably since you'd be hard pressed to find anyone not liking this one but I forgot to add The Magnificent Seven to my original list the other day, it's one of my favorites.

 

I know that many westerns buffs love The Magnificent Seven because of its cast and that rousing Elmer Bernstein musical score. The last time I saw this film, though, I was struck by how relatively little the film has when it comes to action. There's a lot of talk, talk, talk instead, leading up the final confrontation at the end.

I suppose, since I love The Big Country, which is also limited in action, that sounds like a strange criticism. It's just that, with that all male cast The Magnificent Seven, unlike the Wyler film, is a western that breathes macho, therefore I expected more in the way of action. Having said that, I enjoy many of the performances in the film, including those macho ones by Yul Brynner and Eli Wallach. But this will never be one of my favourite westerns. I may well be in a minority with this opinion, though.

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16 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I know that many westerns buffs love The Magnificent Seven because of its cast and that rousing Elmer Bernstein musical score. The last time I saw this film, though, I was struck by how relatively little the film has when it comes to action. There's a lot of talk, talk, talk instead, leading up the final confrontation at the end.

I suppose, since I love The Big Country, which is also limited in action, that sounds like a strange criticism. It's just that, with that all male cast The Magnificent Seven, unlike the Wyler film, is a western that breathes macho, therefore I expected more in the way of action. Having said that, I enjoy many of the performances in the film, including those macho ones by Yul Brynner and Eli Wallach. But this will never be one of my favourite westerns. I may well be in a minority with this opinion, though.

I love The Big Country and have mentioned that on the bds. a number of times. It's one of my favorite westerns. It's funny, I have a very good friend who was a film student and has his masters. He's written screenplays, one was produced and shown on Lifetime. At any rate, he has said the exact opposite of your opinion. He thinks The Big Country had such little action, all talk, talk, talk and bored him and loves The Magnificent Seven. I guess I'm lucky because I love both films and get so much enjoyment watching both The Big Country and The Magnificent Seven.

One film that you both  admire is Ride The High Country, another great film. It's my friend's favorite western and I know you've mentioned how much you like the film.

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I don’t think anyone has mentioned Jubal, with Glenn Ford and Ernest Borgnine, which struck me as almost Shakespearean, although not in a “heavy” way.

Another great one is The Furies, with Barbara Stanwyck and Walter Huston.  I’ve seen it described as “western noir.”

On the lighter side, Cowboy, with Glenn Ford and Jack Lemmon, is very enjoyable.

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15 minutes ago, BingFan said:

I don’t think anyone has mentioned Jubal, with Glenn Ford and Ernest Borgnine, which struck me as almost Shakespearean, although not in a “heavy” way.

Another great one is The Furies, with Barbara Stanwyck and Walter Huston.  I’ve seen it described as “western noir.”

On the lighter side, Cowboy, with Glenn Ford and Jack Lemmon, is very enjoyable.

Yes, The Furies. Like that one very much and I wish TCM would show it. I rented it from a local library years ago. Another Stanwyck one  is Forty Guns.

Another that's fun to watch is Johnny Guitar. TCM shows it every once in awhile but not lately. I wish TCM would put this one back in their rotation.

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