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Charlie Watts 1941-2021


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4 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Here's an old Ed Sullivan clip that shows a not really too animated Watts at work . . .

Sepiatone

That's an old Ed Sullivan clip that shows a not really too animated Charlie Watts, Bill Wyman, Brian Jones, and Keith Richards at work.

Ladies and Gentleman, it's Mick Jagger (AKA "Mr. Showmanship") and the Zombies.

For a band called The Rolling Stones, only one of them is doing any rolling . . . and rocking.

On an altogether different note, I always thought that there was a resemblance between Mick Jagger and actress Andrée Melly.

smn7I92Lt8eUKlhJTrU70ir67sg0Y3r0jtFQoVFT

 

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2 hours ago, Katie_G said:

Just speculation but another possibility re: no drums at home is that perhaps Charlie himself wanted to keep these two lives separate, but other people wouldn't understand it, so blaming the wife was just easier.  My husband has done it too,  I don't care.   Charlie lived on a large estate and could easily have built an unattached music room.    Since so much of his life was already taken up with rehearsals, recording and touring,  he may have found no need to keep a drumset at home.

Maybe, but then why wouldn't he just say he doesn't like to practice at home? If Shirley didn't like the boomp de boomp,  and he had to build a separate space to play in, where he would have to be away from his wife and daughter - and we know he loved his home life -  he may have decided it's not worth it.

A guitarist or violinist or pianist can practice while they watch television and those around them can have a conversation.  When you play the drums, there isn't much else you can do but play the drums, and not much else those around you can do but listen. 

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Happy this thread has survived so long on General Discussions. When I posted some time ago on the death of Cars frontman Ric Ocasek, it didn't take five seconds before a longtime poster on here responded with "What is up with all these non-movie related posts about deaths of rock stars?". and he expressed his extreme displeasure at my messing with his sensibilities. Granted, Ocasek wasn't nearly as important a figure as Charlie Watts, so maybe it was just me or my choice of subject matter  that drew such criticism.

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16 hours ago, Eucalpytus P. Millstone said:

That's an old Ed Sullivan clip that shows a not really too animated Charlie Watts, Bill Wyman, Brian Jones, and Keith Richards at work.

Ladies and Gentleman, it's Mick Jagger (AKA "Mr. Showmanship") and the Zombies.

For a band called The Rolling Stones, only one of them is doing any rolling . . . and rocking.

On an altogether different note, I always thought that there was a resemblance between Mick Jagger and actress Andrée Melly.

smn7I92Lt8eUKlhJTrU70ir67sg0Y3r0jtFQoVFT

 

Yeah, but you gotta admit.  Keith, Brian and Bill were noticeably more animated than Charlie.

Oh, as for Jagger----

I usually saw a resemblance between him and a "Parent Trap" era HAYLEY MILLS.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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😉

14 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Happy this thread has survived so long on General Discussions. When I posted some time ago on the death of Cars frontman Ric Ocasek, it didn't take five seconds before a longtime poster on here responded with "What is up with all these non-movie related posts about deaths of rock stars?". and he expressed his extreme displeasure at my messing with his sensibilities. Granted, Ocasek wasn't nearly as important a figure as Charlie Watts, so maybe it was just me or my choice of subject matter  that drew such criticism.

Well Charlie was in several movies.... including one titled ' Charlie is my Darling''from the Stones tour of Ireland in 65 i think, 

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39 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Yeah, but you gotta admit.  Keith, Brian and Bill were noticeably more animated than Charlie.

Oh, as for Jagger----

I usually saw a resemblance between him and a "Parent Trap" era HAYLEY MILLS.  ;) 

Sepiatone

I disagree. Haley Mills was rather pretty. Mick Jagger looked like my cocker spaniel.

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19 hours ago, Katie_G said:

Just speculation but another possibility re: no drums at home is that perhaps Charlie himself wanted to keep these two lives separate, but other people wouldn't understand it, so blaming the wife was just easier.  

When he was asked if he was a fan of the Rolling Stones Charlie always answered 'no,this is what i do'.  He was i would say a' bureaucrat musician' of sort,if the term exist...

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I'm reminded of a Richard Belzer gag years ago on SNL  where he jabbed at unhip wedding band singers, trying to be "hip"  singing ----

"I can't get any......satisfaction."  :D 

Sepiatone

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On 8/28/2021 at 10:17 PM, sewhite2000 said:

Happy this thread has survived so long on General Discussions. When I posted some time ago on the death of Cars frontman Ric Ocasek, it didn't take five seconds before a longtime poster on here responded with "What is up with all these non-movie related posts about deaths of rock stars?" ...

If we need a TCM connection to justify discussing the great Charlie Watts here, Charlie himself provided that connection, as quoted in the New York Times today (8/30/21):

“...Mr. Watts said he felt out of place in the whole rock ’n’ roll scene — ‘I live in TCM world, Turner Classic Movies,’ he told a BBC radio show, explaining that he’d inherited his father’s love for 1940s-style tailor-made suits, and regarded Fred Astaire as ‘the ultimate in what you should be if you’re a professional.’”

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/30/nyregion/charlie-watts-birdland-nyc.html

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1 hour ago, BingFan said:

If we need a TCM connection to justify discussing the great Charlie Watts here, Charlie himself provided that connection, as quoted in the New York Times today (8/30/21):

“...Mr. Watts said he felt out of place in the whole rock ’n’ roll scene — ‘I live in TCM world, Turner Classic Movies,’ he told a BBC radio show, explaining that he’d inherited his father’s love for 1940s-style tailor-made suits, and regarded Fred Astaire as ‘the ultimate in what you should be if you’re a professional.’”

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/30/nyregion/charlie-watts-birdland-nyc.html

I was just coming back into the thread to post this...

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On 8/29/2021 at 11:40 AM, nakano said:

Well Charlie was in several movies.... including one titled ' Charlie is my Darling''from the Stones tour of Ireland in 65 i think, 

Yep, Ric Ocasek was in a movie too, and someone still grabbed my face and slammed it into a brick wall for posting about him.

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2 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Yep, Ric Ocasek was in a movie too, and someone still grabbed my face and slammed it into a brick wall for posting about him.

Well i saw the Cars headlining a 19000 sold out Forum in Montreal in 1979 they even sold standing room only tix which was un common,it is the worst show i have ever seen and saw a few thousand of them, i told the drummer David Robinson about it, i told them a 55 minutes show (with a horrendous sound system) having 2 albums out do not justify such a short set.They never played in Montreal again.The Cars got ripped off at the Grammys-they gave the new artist award to  A Taste Of  Honey.Ocasek had many songs written while waiting for the big time. Many artists spread them on the first 2 or even 3 lps in case the first is a stiff. but at  the 3rd lp they were running out of gas-pun not intended and got another hit lp with Heartbeat City in 84-85 but they were not a live band and Ocasek hated performing.A thread on Ric Ocasek was your choice and your right .

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A Taste of Honey! Boogie Oogie Oogie! I think I'd read that before about Best New Artists, but I'd forgotten. The history of the Grammys is full pf terrible decisions. I'm immediately wondering how many Grammys the Stones ever won. 

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'Sympathy for the Drummer why Charlie Watts Matters '  a recent book on Charlie Watts was published just before  his death.www.thestranger.comFsympathy-for-the-drummer-is-an-unbeatable-analysis-of-the-rolling-stones-charlie-watts it looks very good and is well written.

FROM A REVIEW   

The author offers several convincing reasons why Watts matters, why he may be the most important Stones member, and [SPOILER ALERT] why he’s the greatest rock-and-roll drummer—and he's extremely entertaining in proving his theses.

 

Sympathy for the Drummer is the opposite of a dry biography. Edison—who's written for Spin, Daily Beast, and Interview, and once served as publisher and editor of High Times—takes a mostly chronological approach to Watts’s and the Stones' stories, going through each phase with perceptive insights, contextualizing Charlie and the band in the grand scheme of music history, detailing the Stones’ personnel changes, off-stage antics, drug and alcohol problems, interpersonal conflicts, etc.

Edison's writing style is flamboyant, funny, and frisky, and his observations are bolstered by his own experiences as a drummer in rock bands such as GG Allin & the Holy Men, Sharky's Machine, Raunch Hands, and Edison Rocket Train. His knowledge of early rock, blues, jazz, and country also makes him well-suited to analyze the Stones' dalliances with other genres. Edison's perspicacity about the timekeepers of rock and roll's pioneers is illuminating, giving shine to musicians commonly overlooked in music histories. His assessments of the jazz drummers who made the biggest impact on Watts’s style are also revelatory.

The key to Watts's success, Edison asserts, is "he never overplayed his hand, never chased flashy fills, never competed with the rest of the band for air space, never played anything just because he could. He found nuance in a music that often had little room for it, and along with his greatest conspirator, Keith Richards, he gave the Stones their swaggering beat." He deems Charlie one of the great minimalists of music, the epitome of the less-is-more ethos. In the process of praising Watts's precision and restraint, Edison mercilessly slams excessive showboater Buddy Rich and casts a skeptical eye/ear toward Rush's Neil Peart and his humongous-kit-loving ilk. Also, Jeff Beck, Doors, and Aerosmith fans may burst a blood vessel upon reading Sympathy for the Drummer. Nevertheless, even if you respect those musicians, these putdowns are supremely entertaining.

 

In another passage, Edison further nails down why Watts rules: "Charlie's style was seemingly uncomplicated, but it was impossible to duplicate. He was an enlightened savant, unchained. His unique, old-world sense of syncopation and newfound futurist frenzy pushed the Rolling Stones over the top into an unparalleled stratum of audacity, courage, and revolt..."

 

Edison has something interesting to say about each Rolling Stones album, even if the releases themselves aren't interesting. Once we're past 1981's Tattoo You, his enthusiasm really wanes, and you can't blame him. However, it's nice to see someone give the oft-scorned Black and Blue the props it deserves.

I asked Edison if he’d tried to get an interview with Mr. Watts, and he said, “Charlie has a no-interview policy and the Stones don’t cooperate with anything unauthorized. I made a perfunctory stab, but it wasn’t gonna happen. Honestly, it is better this way; I don’t owe them anything or feel any obligation to pull punches.”

That checks out. And although Edison doesn’t shy away from noting the Stones’ aesthetic and personality flaws, and Watts's struggles with alcoholism and drug addiction, the band and their drummer still emerge at the end of Sympathy for the Drummer’s 249 pages looking more like Mick Jagger’s bank account than Keith Richards's visage.

9/10, would read again.

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