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3 hours ago, SansFin said:

I am convinced that the reason foreign movies are held in such high regard in America is that the only ones which are shown here are the best-of-the-best and have good reviews internationally before being considered for release here.

Sure; there's a maxim that 90% of what every culture produces is cr@p and that what survives is mostly from the 10%.

But as I implied with my comments about the New Wave, I think there's a tendency among the critics and the sort of people who use the word "curate" (a word I've come to hate) the various collections to think that because these movies are art-house and decidedly Not-Hollywood, that automatically makes them good.  If you've ever seen my comments here about films like The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie or Alice in the Cities, to give two examples, I don't particularly share that opinion.

Around the same time that I saw The Count of the Old Town, I saw a completely different movie that also made me start thinking about these things, Young Cassidy.  Rod Taylor plays Irish playwright Sean O'Casey, and a good portion of the movie deals with the arts people running the Abbey Theater in Dublin wanting O'Casey to write things they think the Irish people need, rather than what the people themselves want.  It's a lot how I feel about the programming of foreign movies.

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4 hours ago, SansFin said:

That is so very true. 

I am convinced that the reason foreign movies are held in such high regard in America is that the only ones which are shown here are the best-of-the-best and have good reviews internationally before being considered for release here.

I can assure you that there are a few notable exceptions but most comedies made in Belgium in the 1940s and early 1950s were uniformly bad. No one speaks of them because they quite properly died in obscurity.

Here is something I found a year or two ago, don't know if I ever mentioned it on here.  An introductory piece to what looks like a great comedy series of 14 films, The Olsen Gang (Denmark).  I didn't get around to finding out if the whole thing was subtitled in English, but submit this series as a potential theme.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdQdB5EB6H0

 

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I think everything will be fine. TCM has always been niche, but they’ve survived for almost 30 years due to rabid fans like us (and w/out commercials!) That’s an incredible accomplishment.

Forget about the AMC comparison. They changed their programming because they couldn’t keep up with TCM. At least that’s my theory. 

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On 8/26/2021 at 5:56 PM, TopBilled said:

I think it shows that people are creatures of habit and many resist change.

But then there are those who like change and look forward to new and improved things.

Change for change's sake is often not an improvement at all.  

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1 hour ago, JamesinArlington said:

Change for change's sake is often not an improvement at all.  

I agree with that in theory. But if we're saying this to discourage any sort of change, then of course I disagree.

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Ok, I know there’s a lot of worry and concern  now. But check out this logo at the end of the recent Mank announcement….

Am I crazy or does that look like an old school Criterion logo?! Might they be merging the channel with The Criterion Collection?! Or at least giving programming and scheduling to them? They’re already in partnership with them on a myriad of titles they’ve licensed from them via HBO Max. And this would also allow Criterion to promote their awesome streaming service, The Criterion Channel, that much more.

So that’s my theory, and I think it’d be cool. But for all we know this could just be a simple new coat of paint and a rebrand to Classic Movie Channel, or something like that. But I’d love if the former was true.

Thoughts?

3991D8B9-96ED-4A13-A4C3-CF435B04AA5D.png

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The changes, for better or worse, have already begun.

I just heard Alicia Malone in her intro to SARATOGA TRUNK explain to us:  "Flora Robson was a white actress who is in blackface for her role as Ingrid Bergman's maid"

Jesus, Mary and Joseph.

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1 hour ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

The changes, for better or worse, have already begun.

I just heard Alicia Malone in her intro to SARATOGA TRUNK explain to us:  "Flora Robson was a white actress who is in blackface for her role as Ingrid Bergman's maid"

Jesus, Mary and Joseph.

Can anyone say "wokism"?

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1 hour ago, fxreyman said:

Can anyone say "wokism"?

I'll say it, loud and clear.

Levelling the playing field is one thing, but this is all (imo) a Slippery Slope.

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3 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

The changes, for better or worse, have already begun.

I just heard Alicia Malone in her intro to SARATOGA TRUNK explain to us:  "Flora Robson was a white actress who is in blackface for her role as Ingrid Bergman's maid"

Jesus, Mary and Joseph.

Well be fair. She does look a little odd. I'd say an explanation might be in order. 

511full-saratoga-trunk-poster.jpg

 

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8 hours ago, JamesinArlington said:

Change for change's sake is often not an improvement at all.  

Much of the time, change is proposed solely for the purpose of the proposers trying to justify their existence.

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I'm still unsure of what game TCM is playing vis a vis "social justice reform."  The movies they have traditionally programmed come, of course, from a different time. In many ways, they are relics of that time,  frozen in celluloid and immutable.  They can't be changed.  That many of those films fly in the face of today's sensibilities goes without saying.

We are not stupid,.  We know this.  So I have some aversion to being lectured to by TCM.  I know this isn't driven by the hosts.  They are paid presenters reading a script.  But a steady diet of wokism will only drive viewers away, as, by its very nature, it takes aim at many of our most beloved films.  And more than that, it's simply unnecessary.  Is blackface offensive?  Of course.  We get it!  Is nearly every role by Willie Best insulting to blacks (and everyone else)?  Yes.  But again, we get it!

I come to TCM for enjoyment and a bit of camaraderie and to learn a bit about "old Hollywood."  I find the studio system fascinating and the films made them equally so.

So please god don't turn TCM into some forum where every film is judged by its adherence to 2021 mores.  It won't work.

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6 minutes ago, LuckyDan said:

Well be fair. She does look a little odd. I'd say an explanation might be in order. 

511full-saratoga-trunk-poster.jpg

 

But why not say a "British actress" is playing this part? Instead of "white actress."

It's not wokism as much as it's an attempt to sound like there is an intelligent conversation going on about the casting of roles.

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I just did a search and found an article that said TCM has been sold. To read the article, I would have to join a site (Media Post), which I didn't want to do. But from the blurb, it seemed to indicate that TCM will be merging with Discovery. This may all be fake, but it's what I found. (Perhaps someone has already posted this, I haven't read all the posts in this thread.)

TCM EVOLVES AS CORPORATE OWNERS CHANGE

 

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3 hours ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

I just heard Alicia Malone in her intro to SARATOGA TRUNK explain to us:  "Flora Robson was a white actress who is in blackface for her role as Ingrid Bergman's maid"

I don’t see what’s “woke” or even objectionable about Malone pointing this out. It’s a true fact, isn’t it? And it was already quite rare in 1945 to see a white actor in blackface (even if it’s not specifically minstrel show blackface) in a dramatic role, so noting this in some introductory comments seems appropriate. Black actresses were considered for the role, but a deliberate choice was made to cast a white actress and put dark makeup on her. This is notable and worth mentioning, and no, everybody doesn’t know this already. Many people watch TCM who haven’t seen all the movies before and don’t know much about film history.

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2 minutes ago, Swithin said:

I just did a search and found an article that said TCM has been sold. To read the article, I would have to join a site (Media Post), which I didn't want to do. But from the blurb, it seemed to indicate that TCM will be merging with Discovery. This may all be fake, but it's what I found.

TCM EVOLVES AS CORPORATE OWNERS CHANGE

 

TCM is still part of Warner, and Warner and Discovery are merging, as AT&T has wanted to sell their media holdings.  But that's not expected to close until sometime in the middle of 2022.

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16 minutes ago, overeasy said:

We are not stupid,.  

Ehhh ... Some of us kinda are? 

There are people looking for things to be outraged by. TCM may be in a defensive posture and taking pre-emptive measures to avoid being called out by the mob, members of which might tune in at an inopportune time, see Flora in blackface, and go into "this is no longer acceptable!" mode. 

I didn't see the intro so I don't know if it was a social justice scolding or a simple explanation of a depiction that might lead to questions, but if it was the latter, I get it. 

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1 hour ago, mattblankzero said:

I don’t see what’s “woke” or even objectionable about Malone pointing this out. It’s a true fact, isn’t it? And it was already quite rare in 1945 to see a white actor in blackface (even if it’s not specifically minstrel show blackface) in a dramatic role, so noting this in some introductory comments seems appropriate. Black actresses were considered for the role, but a deliberate choice was made to cast a white actress and put dark makeup on her. This is notable and worth mentioning, and no, everybody doesn’t know this already. Many people watch TCM who haven’t seen all the movies before and don’t know much about film history.

matt,  I can't say it any better than the above post by overeasy.  

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On 8/26/2021 at 5:46 PM, Fedya said:

I'm sure Eddie Muller can tell us how it's really a noir.

That would be Honey, I Shanked the Kids.

 

On 8/26/2021 at 5:15 PM, Dargo said:

Lemme guess here, Dave.

Honey, I Shunk the Kids is your absolute, numero uno, top o' the list favorite flick of all time, RIGHT?!

(...oh, just a wild guess here, that's all)  ;) 

FYI, Dargo, you left out the "r" in Shrunk.

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Look, FWIW, I find those James FitzPatrick Travel Talks quite racist. There, I said it!  Very Euro-centric and condescending to all the "exotic" and "picturesque" (James' favorite words) locals.  However, I wouldn't want these shorts to be cancelled.   I did find that "tribute" to TT fascinating -- the narrator kept going on about how "curious" FitzPatrick (who I don't doubt was a well-meaning person) was  and how he brought an expanded awareness of the world and its diverse cultures to movie theatre audiences, but I'd like to think that some of those early viewers, however provincial they might have been, could have perceived a few stereotypes coming across.

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1 minute ago, Bronxgirl48 said:

Look, FTIW, I find those James FitzPatrick Travel Talks quite racist. There, I said it!  Very Euro-centric and condescending to all the "exotic" and "picturesque" (James' favorite words) locals.  However, I wouldn't want these shorts to be cancelled.   I did find that "tribute" to TT fascinating -- the narrator kept going on about how "curious" FitzPatrick (who I don't doubt was a well-meaning person) was  and how he brought an expanded awareness of the world and its diverse cultures to movie theatre audiences, but I'd like to think that some of those early viewers, however provincial they might have been, could have perceived a few stereotypes coming across.

Right. Not every person who lived in the boondocks was ignorant.

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Copied and pasted from my own post in the September schedule thread, information swiped from MCOH and others, here's what TCM is showing in primetime on September 1:

They Died with Their Boots On (Errol Flynn, Olivia DeHavilland) (Warner Bros., 1941)
Key Largo (Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall) (Warner Bros., 1948)
The Barkleys of Broadway (Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers) (MGM, 1949)
Mogambo (Clark Gable, Ava Gardner) (MGM, 1953)
Guess Who's Coming to Dinner? (Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn) (Columbia, 1967)

Nothing earth-shatteringly different, pretty standard in-library TCM fare. The content between the airing of the features might be different, however.

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5 hours ago, TopBilled said:

But why not say a "British actress" is playing this part? Instead of "white actress."

 

Because "British" wouldn't be triggering.

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