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Would you pay 9.99 a month to be able to view any film in the "TCM Library" any time you wanted?


yanceycravat
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I am certain that we would gladly pay that amount for on-demand access to all movies in the classic "TCM Library"!

I am much less certain we might pay half that for a live feed of the channel and the meager offerings of their current on-demand library.

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Yes. But I rather doubt:

  1. That would be enough to cover the costs of scanning EVERY title in the TCM library (I don't want to rewatch Casablanca, I want to see that rightfully obscure MGM 1930 short that features no one you've ever heard of and is moldering at the back of the archives), and maintaining the infrastructure necessary to catalog every title and make them available on demand.
  2. That the executives would authorize something like this, when their established business model is to require people to pay for a cable or streaming package bundled with channels the viewer doesn't want to see, in order to get TCM and/or other channels they want.
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We pay $5.99 month to Spectrum to have access to Acorn on Demand via cable.  Not sure I would pay to have it streamed as we do not watch "TV" on computer, laptops, etc. - only on real TV's.  

Also, probably have not watched very much in last few months as we binged everything we wanted the first few months we had it.  Now just wait for "new" episodes of the 3 or 4 series we like to show up.

So, would we pay $9.99 to start for TCM?  Not sure, but probably not.  Actually don't watch TCM that often lately.  Maybe once per week?

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If I could view every film in the TCM library, regardless of the condition it is in, then yes I would pay ten bucks a month for that.  The question is, where is the date cut-off for Warner Brothers films, because the original Turner Library consisted only of WB films 1929-1948. I doubt you would be able to see recent releases of WB films. But I would want access to ALL of the silent films in the MGM library, even those that have never been scored. 

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Absolutely, positively NOT! In addition to what TCM is showing live, my cable company's mobile offerings include (at the moment) 177 TCM films.   That, in addition to all the other programming available to me, is more than enough for me!

 

 

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10 hours ago, yanceycravat said:

Because TCM is the channel I seem to watch more than any other I was wondering if others would be interested in something like this.  Is 9.99 a fair price to be able to call up any movie at any time?

Just curious what others think.

Isn't this what FilmStruck was all about? Films from the Turner library with films from the Criterion Collection?

The problem I had with FilmStruck is that someone else chose what films from the Turner library would be available. It was limited to around 60 films, usually films with household names or films that fell under certain themes.

I like to create my own themes and I like to be able to discover the work of second tier stars and character actors. I don't just want films starring John Wayne or Katharine Hepburn all the time or films only directed by Alfred Hitchcock and John Ford.

I want a more comprehensive view of film history to include unheralded programmers, B films and various other neglected classics.

Anyway I think that since 2008 when I started watching TCM, started recording things on VHS and DVD and started streaming and buying titles on Amazon Prime and other online sources, I have been creating what I call the TopBilled Classic Library.

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24 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Isn't this what FilmStruck was all about? Films from the Turner library with films from the Criterion Collection?

The problem I had with FilmStruck is that someone else chose what films from the Turner library would be available. It was limited to around 60 films, usually films with household names or films that fell under certain themes.

I like to create my own themes and I like to be able to discover the work of second tier stars and character actors. I don't just want films starring John Wayne or Katharine Hepburn all the time or films only directed by Alfred Hitchcock and John Ford.

I want a more comprehensive view of film history to include unheralded programmers, B films and various other neglected classics.

Anyway I think that since 2008 when I started watching TCM, started recording things on VHS and DVD and started streaming and buying titles on Amazon Prime and other online sources, I have been creating what I call the TopBilled Classic Library.

I’ve  done the same thing: recorded many, many films from TCM, to supplement our collection of commercially-issued DVDs.  While these physical discs take up a lot of space around our house, my wife and I really like being able to watch the movies we’re interested in when we want to.  

Even the streaming services with very good taste — e.g., the old Filmstruck and the current Criterion Channel — only feature a limited selection of films chosen by someone else, and they disappear after a while.  While a streaming service made up of the entire TCM film library (I.e., all the movies they would normally show) sounds great in theory, it seems like the necessary server capacity would be hugely expensive.  I’ve always assumed that’s why there aren’t any truly “everything-all-the-time” streaming services already, but tell me if you know otherwise.  (Yes, streaming companies do like to limit their available content as a way of controlling demand, but I don’t think that’s the only limiting factor.)

There’s another major problem with streaming services for some people (including me): millions  of potential viewers don’t have internet service that supports streaming.   I get internet service and high-definition video by satellite, and the internet service is substandard in terms of speed and capacity compared to the typical wired internet service provided by cable and phone companies. Because there is no wired internet service where we live, we can’t do streaming in any meaningful way.  (When we’ve tried it a few times, it was a nightmare of constant buffering; it would have taken hours to get through a 30-minute show.)

To answer the OP’s original question, no, I wouldn’t pay $9.99 per month for an “everything-all-the-time” TCM streaming service.

 

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3 hours ago, 37kitties said:

How many films are in the "TCM Library"?

It includes:

- MGM films from 1925 to 1986

- Warner Brothers films from 1924 to 1986 (some were made under Warner Brothers-Seven Arts when the company was temporarily rebranded in the late 60s)

- RKO films from 1929 to 1957 (some were under RKO-Pathe from 1929 to 1932)

- UA films from about 1920 to 1986 (the high profile titles were rebranded MGM/UA in the early 80s)

- Monogram/Allied Artists films from 1935 to 1980

- American International Pictures from 1955 to 1980 (includes Orion Pictures from 1978 to 1986)

The exact number would be difficult to determine. And you did not specify in your question if you meant only feature films or if you were including short films as well.

But I would estimate that the number of titles in these individual libraries which combine to make the Turner Library would be close to 10,000.

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16 minutes ago, BingFan said:

I’ve  done the same thing: recorded many, many films from TCM, to supplement our collection of commercially-issued DVDs.  While these physical discs take up a lot of space around our house, my wife and I really like being able to watch the movies we’re interested in when we want to.  

Even the streaming services with very good taste — e.g., the old Filmstruck and the current Criterion Channel — only feature a limited selection of films chosen by someone else, and they disappear after a while.  While a streaming service made up of the entire TCM film library (I.e., all the movies they would normally show) sounds great in theory, it seems like the necessary server capacity would be hugely expensive.  I’ve always assumed that’s why there aren’t any truly “everything-all-the-time” streaming services already, but tell me if you know otherwise.  (Yes, streaming companies do like to limit their available content as a way of controlling demand, but I don’t think that’s the only limiting factor.)

There’s another major problem with streaming services for some people (including me): millions  of potential viewers don’t have internet service that supports streaming.   I get internet service and high-definition video by satellite, and the internet service is substandard in terms of speed and capacity compared to the typical wired internet service provided by cable and phone companies. Because there is no wired internet service where we live, we can’t do streaming in any meaningful way.  (When we’ve tried it a few times, it was a nightmare of constant buffering; it would have taken hours to get through a 30-minute show.)

To answer the OP’s original question, no, I wouldn’t pay $9.99 per month for an “everything-all-the-time” TCM streaming service.

 

I think the way to offer all the films in the Turner Library online would be to create separate platforms by decade. That would make it manageable. Or to create platforms by genre with the idea that classic entails films from the silent era up to the current year. And to give customers the option of buying the titles.

But as you say, they want to regulate what is available and to be able to add and remove titles (at a whim).

This is why the ONLY real answer here is to create your own personal library that you can watch any time you want to and without having to keep paying someone each month.

I had TCM from 2008 up through 2015 when I cut the cord. I knew that I was never going to keep paying for cable forever. So I made a point of recording as much as I could during those years from TCM, from Fox Movie Channel (which became FXM Retro), from Starz/Encore, from RetroPlex and from PBS. 

As I have said in another thread, I gave all my VHS tapes away and I gave about 80% of my DVDs away when I started buying films on Prime that I can stream anytime I want. 

I know they've had FilmStruck and the Warner Archives (which was DVD-based for a long time)...but if the TCM brand had moved directly into streaming like Prime, Netflix and Hulu and started selling classic titles on a digital platform, I would have bought films from them with the Robert Osborne wraparounds. But for a long time the channel has seemed stuck in the mindset of selling DVDs and wine (no thanks) which is not what I want.

My current classic film library is independent of TCM. But if TCM airs a rarity, then I hope people watch TCM to see it.

 

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I'm a member of MOMA (the Museum of Modern Art), which I can walk to. They are resuming their in-theater screening series (vaccination proof required) but have also added "Virtual Cinema" for members. Upcoming virtual series which I am looking forward to include "Magnolia Pictures at 20," a hybrid (virtual and in-person) series of 22 movies; and "John Ford Rarities," featuring two early John Ford films, which I have never seen. Many other offerings as well, focusing on early cinema as well as international films.

https://www.moma.org/calendar/film

 

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3 hours ago, 37kitties said:

How many films are in the "TCM Library"?

Been waaaayyy too long for me to remember where I got this info from:

Turner Entertainment Co. Film Library:
The Turner library holdings consist of the pre-1986 MGM library, the pre-1949 Warner Brothers library, and the entire RKO library.

1,707 MGM Feature Films (1915-1986)
854 Warner Bros. Feature Films (1924-1949)
787 RKO Feature Films (1929-1958)
948 MGM Short Subjects
320 MGM Cartoons
1,450 Warner Bros. Short Subjects
335 Warner Bros. Cartoons
51 RKO Short Subjects

 

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Just now, yanceycravat said:

Been waaaayyy too long for me to remember where I got this info from:

Turner Entertainment Co. Film Library:
The Turner library holdings consist of the pre-1986 MGM library, the pre-1949 Warner Brothers library, and the entire RKO library.

1,707 MGM Feature Films (1915-1986)
854 Warner Bros. Feature Films (1924-1949)
787 RKO Feature Films (1929-1958)
948 MGM Short Subjects
320 MGM Cartoons
1,450 Warner Bros. Short Subjects
335 Warner Bros. Cartoons
51 RKO Short Subjects

It may have started that way, but they added the Monogram/Allied Artists catalogue as well as the American International Pictures catalogue plus Warner Brothers films post 1949.

And they control many United Artists pictures. The MGM/UA merger is part of American film history. 

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1 minute ago, TopBilled said:

It may have started that way, but they added the Monogram/Allied Artists catalogue as well as the American International Pictures catalogue plus Warner Brothers films post 1949.

And they control many United Artists pictures. The MGM/UA merger is part of American film history. 

That information I posted was so old the document it contained crumbled to dust right after I copied it!

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7 minutes ago, yanceycravat said:

That information I posted was so old the document it contained crumbled to dust right after I copied it!

I should say that many of the Monogram/AA and AIP films are available through the Warner Archive. So maybe those were Warner acquisitions, but they are connected to the Turner library and the TCM programmers have access to those titles.

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Would I pay $9.99/mo.?  Yes.  
Would Warner charge it?  NO.

1 hour ago, TopBilled said:

I should say that many of the Monogram/AA and AIP films are available through the Warner Archive. So maybe those were Warner acquisitions, but they are connected to the Turner library and the TCM programmers have access to those titles.

I remember when Warner Archive had its own on-demand streaming service, back before it was folded into Filmstruck (and there into the TCM wing of HBOMax), and pretty much the ONLY movies that showed up for streaming were the obscure pre-codes, the Monogram, AIP and United Artists films, and the TV-movies.

IOW, the cheap out-of-copyright titles that they could get away with streaming, since most of the better known titles had to be licensed, and thus didn't stay around for very long.  That's the harsh reality of Streaming that even the most starry-eyed, locked-down fan discovers after about six months or so.  😍  😑

(Granted, this was back in the birth-of-Instant-Netflix days, when Amazon, Hulu and Crackle all tried to spin off streaming services, thought we would be watching on our laptops and cellphones, and only could afford public-domain movies.)

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2 hours ago, BingFan said:

I’ve  done the same thing: recorded many, many films from TCM, to supplement our collection of commercially-issued DVDs.  While these physical discs take up a lot of space around our house, my wife and I really like being able to watch the movies we’re interested in when we want to.  

Even the streaming services with very good taste — e.g., the old Filmstruck and the current Criterion Channel — only feature a limited selection of films chosen by someone else, and they disappear after a while.  While a streaming service made up of the entire TCM film library (I.e., all the movies they would normally show) sounds great in theory, it seems like the necessary server capacity would be hugely expensive.  I’ve always assumed that’s why there aren’t any truly “everything-all-the-time” streaming services already, but tell me if you know otherwise.  (Yes, streaming companies do like to limit their available content as a way of controlling demand, but I don’t think that’s the only limiting factor.)

There’s another major problem with streaming services for some people (including me): millions  of potential viewers don’t have internet service that supports streaming.   I get internet service and high-definition video by satellite, and the internet service is substandard in terms of speed and capacity compared to the typical wired internet service provided by cable and phone companies. Because there is no wired internet service where we live, we can’t do streaming in any meaningful way.  (When we’ve tried it a few times, it was a nightmare of constant buffering; it would have taken hours to get through a 30-minute show.)

To answer the OP’s original question, no, I wouldn’t pay $9.99 per month for an “everything-all-the-time” TCM streaming service.

 

We're sort of the same way.  We purchased lots of DVD's (still do) and I recorded a lot from TCM and FXM during their commercial free periods.  For storage I googled for media cabinets and media towers.  Lots of options out there, but really like the bookcase looking types that are very shallow.  Placed two in a hallway.

Recently got into streaming, but only do the free ones - IMDb, Tubi and HBO Max.  HBO max is courtesy of Spectrum as we still subscribe to HBO, but mainly for its series.  However, streaming is not as reliable as cable.  Usually have no problem, but sometimes signal pauses and sometimes does it several times in a row and we give up.  Using an extender does help, but still does it occasionally.

About once per week I will check out the TCM On Demand on Spectrum, but almost never find anything I want to watch.

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Here are the facts about the TCM movies (177 at present) I can watch online, or wherever. This is different from the "On Demand" feature on my television.

FAQ:

What is Watch TCM?

Watch TCM is a "TV Everywhere" service that allows you to access on demand movies as well as live broadcasts of TCM online and on devices that support the Watch TCM app.


Which Devices is Watch TCM available on?

  • Online at TCM.com/watch
  • iOS phones and tablets (iPads)
  • Android phones
  • Amazon Fire TV
  • Apple TV (4th generation)

Apple Airplay is also supported for Watch TCM


Do I need a Cable TV or Satellite TV subscription to use Watch TCM?

Yes. You must be subscribed to Turner Classic Movies at home through a cable or satellite TV provider in order to use Watch TCM.


Ok, I have TCM at home. How do I access/sign-in to Watch TCM to watch movies?

Here are simple steps to access Watch TCM.

1.  Have your Cable or Satellite TV account login information ready, this is usually just a user name and password. If you don’t know what this is, contact your service provider.

2.  Find your service provider from our list. If you are having problems seeing your TV provider, please select “view all” for an alphabetical list. 

3.  Enter these credentials into the Watch TCM sign-up screen. Your TV Service Provider needs to be on our list of partners. Watch TCM is available only to customers who get TCM at home and have a TV provider on our current list.


What movies are available?

Most of the films that air on TCM are available on Watch TCM. However, due to licensing issues, some titles may not be available. Shorts that air on the network are also available on Watch TCM as well as hosted introductions to movies.


How long are movies available?

Movies are available generally for 7 days in Watch TCM after they air on Turner Classic Movies. In most cases, movies will appear in Watch TCM within 3 hours after they air on the network.


Can I watch the live broadcast of TCM?

Yes. There are 2 live broadcasts on Watch TCM. The West Coast feed shows films in PST, while the East Coast version shows films in EST. No matter where you are, you can access either of these live broadcasts in Watch TCM. 


I missed my favorite movie. Will it come back?

In most cases, Yes. Movies often air on TCM more than once during the year, and if we have the licensing rights to play the movie on Watch TCM, they will be included again.


How do I use Closed Captions on Watch TCM?

Locate the “CC” box on your online video player or mobile device video playback. If captions are available for the program, selecting this box will enable Closed Captions to appear.

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1 hour ago, yanceycravat said:

Been waaaayyy too long for me to remember where I got this info from:

Turner Entertainment Co. Film Library:
The Turner library holdings consist of the pre-1986 MGM library, the pre-1949 Warner Brothers library, and the entire RKO library.

1,707 MGM Feature Films (1915-1986)
854 Warner Bros. Feature Films (1924-1949)
787 RKO Feature Films (1929-1958)

So, just over 3300. Thanks for this info, yanceycravat.

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1 hour ago, EricJ said:

Would I pay $9.99/mo.?  Yes.  
Would Warner charge it?  NO.

I remember when Warner Archive had its own on-demand streaming service, back before it was folded into Filmstruck (and there into the TCM wing of HBOMax), and pretty much the ONLY movies that showed up for streaming were the obscure pre-codes, the Monogram, AIP and United Artists films, and the TV-movies.

IOW, the cheap out-of-copyright titles that they could get away with streaming, since most of the better known titles had to be licensed, and thus didn't stay around for very long.  That's the harsh reality of Streaming that even the most starry-eyed, locked-down fan discovers after about six months or so.  😍  😑

(Granted, this was back in the birth-of-Instant-Netflix days, when Amazon, Hulu and Crackle all tried to spin off streaming services, thought we would be watching on our laptops and cellphones, and only could afford public-domain movies.)

But some films can be licensed to more than one platform at the same time. (I said some not a lot.)

If I recall correctly, they would put some "A" films on the Warner Archive streaming site after they had just aired on TCM and were removed from the Watch TCM app. So they cycled through that way.

But I agree, a fair percentage of the titles were the cheapies nobody really wanted to see.

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5 hours ago, yanceycravat said:

Been waaaayyy too long for me to remember where I got this info from:

Turner Entertainment Co. Film Library:
The Turner library holdings consist of the pre-1986 MGM library, the pre-1949 Warner Brothers library, and the entire RKO library.

1,707 MGM Feature Films (1915-1986)
854 Warner Bros. Feature Films (1924-1949)
787 RKO Feature Films (1929-1958)
948 MGM Short Subjects
320 MGM Cartoons
1,450 Warner Bros. Short Subjects
335 Warner Bros. Cartoons
51 RKO Short Subjects

 

Actually that jives quite well with the early news on TCM when it was being founded that they had over 3300 feature films in the Turner library. 

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