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Classic movie antithesis


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I love how clearly defined the archetypes are in classic movies.

Sweet Ma & Tom Joad who kill their enemies with kindness in THE GRAPES OF WRATH (1940).

Screen Shot 2019-12-10 at 8.57.09 PM.jpeg

Versus Ma & Cody Jarrett who kill their enemies with bullets in WHITE HEAT (1949).

F5A21C7E-9B06-4116-ABE0-6BE2120709ED_4_5005_c

Barbara Stanwyck is a victimizer in DOUBLE INDEMNITY (1944).

Screen Shot 2021-08-29 at 3.12.47 PM

Then she's a victim in SORRY WRONG NUMBER (1948).

Screen Shot 2020-01-29 at 10.52.35 AM.jpeg

Can't forget debonair Claude Rains. Heavenly in HERE COMES MR. JORDAN (1941).

45C54169-B9AE-416A-8952-C0EAF4E14568_1_105_c

And hellish as the PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (1943).

Screen Shot 2021-08-26 at 8.29.16 AM

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3 minutes ago, Allhallowsday said:

The old bee atch... 🤣

LOL

Well, ONLY if Jimmy, ahem, I mean if GEORGE had never been born, of course. ;) 

Btw and as you might know Allhallows, while Beulah was usually cast as the more doting motherly type, she was REALLY good at playing what you just called her here in 1941's The Shepherd of the Hills...

1771-17181.jpg

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How about Bette Davis' Baby Jane Hudson tormenting her crippled sister Blanche (Joan Crawford) in WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO BABY JANE?.....

Then 2 years later Bette portrays the unfortunate Charlotte victimized by her wicked, scheming cousin Miriam (Olivia de Havilland) and Miriam's equally despicable lover Drew (Joseph Cotten) in HUSH....HUSH, SWEET CHARLOTTE.

Talk about turning the tide here.

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6 hours ago, TopBilled said:

I love how clearly defined the archetypes are in classic movies.

Sweet Ma & Tom Joad who kill their enemies with kindness in THE GRAPES OF WRATH (1940).

Screen Shot 2019-12-10 at 8.57.09 PM.jpeg

Versus Ma & Cody Jarrett who kill their enemies with bullets in WHITE HEAT (1949).

F5A21C7E-9B06-4116-ABE0-6BE2120709ED_4_5005_c

Barbara Stanwyck is a victimizer in DOUBLE INDEMNITY (1944).

Screen Shot 2021-08-29 at 3.12.47 PM

Then she's a victim in SORRY WRONG NUMBER (1948).

Screen Shot 2020-01-29 at 10.52.35 AM.jpeg

Can't forget debonair Claude Rains. Heavenly in HERE COMES MR. JORDAN (1941).

45C54169-B9AE-416A-8952-C0EAF4E14568_1_105_c

And hellish as the PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (1943).

Screen Shot 2021-08-26 at 8.29.16 AM

-- Guns of Navarone, to Keys of the Kingdom. - Gregory Peck.

--  White Heat, to Yankee Doodle Dandy. - Jimmy Cagney.

-- Gods Little Acre, to Pretty Much the Entirety of the Rest of His Career. - Buddy Hackett.

-- Dragon Tattoo Trilogy, to Mary Magdalene. - Rooney Mara.

-- Joker.. Inherent Vice.. You Were Never Really Here (Pick 'em).. to Mary Magdalene. - Joaquim Phoenix. (sp)

 

 

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10 hours ago, Dargo said:

Beat THIS one!

Beulah Bondi...and all in one movie and even as the very same character! And in of course, this one particular perennial Christmas flick here...

She played the crotchety Grandma in The Southerner, and always came back around to kindness when scolded/prodded.

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Of course you have Henry Fonda as the all-American nice guy who wants to do the right thing  (MISTER ROBERTS, TWELVE ANGRY MEN, THE OX-BOW INCIDENT come to mind) to his cold-blooded, murdering snake-in-the-grass Frank in ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST who has no mercy for his victims (not even a child!).

Also with his ruthless bandit in FIRECREEK, Fonda was also playing against type.

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Roddy McDowall spent his entire childhood playing lovable, wide-eyed innocents, but after his successful turn as the scheming Mordred in the original Broadway production of Camelot, he was suddenly in demand for more villainous roles (e.g., in Cleopatra and Shock Treatment, where he decapitates his boss with a pair of garden shears).  He continued to do so periodically throughout his career, especially in voiceover roles.

download-15.jpg.fcc5fd89585d2c37658bb264bbbdd1a1.jpgdownload-13.jpg.bd779d90dac46d692ddf49eccf87f07b.jpg

One of the more extreme cases of this duality is Anthony Perkins, who played sweet, harmless boy-next-door types until he was cast in Psycho, and spent the rest of his career trying to escape the consequences of having played that part so brilliantly.  But such offbeat casting was typical of Hitchcock, who often deliberately challenged (or at least complicated) the sort of binary archetypes you're referencing in this thread.  His instinct was often to cast his putative villains with normally mild-mannered actors (Joseph Cotten in Shadow of a Doubt, Claude Rains in Notorious, Robert Walker in Strangers on a Train), or else to allow his putative heroes to behave like cads or jerks for much of the film (Cary Grant in Suspicion and Notorious).

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1 hour ago, Fausterlitz said:

Roddy McDowall spent his entire childhood playing lovable, wide-eyed innocents, but after his successful turn as the scheming Mordred in the original Broadway production of Camelot, he was suddenly in demand for more villainous roles (e.g., in Cleopatra and Shock Treatment, where he decapitates his boss with a pair of garden shears).  He continued to do so periodically throughout his career, especially in voiceover roles.

download-15.jpg.fcc5fd89585d2c37658bb264bbbdd1a1.jpgdownload-13.jpg.bd779d90dac46d692ddf49eccf87f07b.jpg

 

My favorite Roddy McDowall bad guy role is the despicable money-hungry nephew in the NIGHT GALLERY pilot, the first tale called THE CEMETARY who 

(SPOILER ALERT).....

speeds up the death of his elderly uncle (George Macready) in order to get his mitts on his fortune....only the nephew ends up being tormented to his own grave when he starts seeing the painting of a cemetery where his uncle is buried changing with his uncle rising from his coffin and knocking on the door.

Very spooky tale with a very chilling ending, and McDowall made a great heel in that one.

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1 hour ago, TopBilled said:

 

Is there a female version of this in films?

I did a Google search - found this which is halfway there

Dr Jekyll & Sister Hyde (1971) - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0068502/reference

Further in the Google search - found this:

Jacqueline Hyde (2005) - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0460834/reference 

You may find the second film posted here twice, maybe (and it may be p*rn, reads like it . . .).

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On 8/29/2021 at 5:47 PM, TopBilled said:

I love how clearly defined the archetypes are in classic movies.

Sweet Ma & Tom Joad who kill their enemies with kindness in THE GRAPES OF WRATH (1940).

Screen Shot 2019-12-10 at 8.57.09 PM.jpeg

Versus Ma & Cody Jarrett who kill their enemies with bullets in WHITE HEAT (1949).

F5A21C7E-9B06-4116-ABE0-6BE2120709ED_4_5005_c

Barbara Stanwyck is a victimizer in DOUBLE INDEMNITY (1944).

Screen Shot 2021-08-29 at 3.12.47 PM

Then she's a victim in SORRY WRONG NUMBER (1948).

Screen Shot 2020-01-29 at 10.52.35 AM.jpeg

Can't forget debonair Claude Rains. Heavenly in HERE COMES MR. JORDAN (1941).

45C54169-B9AE-416A-8952-C0EAF4E14568_1_105_c

And hellish as the PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (1943).

Screen Shot 2021-08-26 at 8.29.16 AM

Here's Another (Recent Nominee) That i Just Completely Blitzed On & Forgot to Mention.

     Sarah Silverman. Madam Silverman is Completely Sans Her Usual Humour in the (Rather Exceptional) I Smile Back. (i) Find She Possess A Dramatic Tone, Feeling, and Spirit of Angst and Forboding that is Not Present (or at least, Not Nearly As Discernable and Tangible) In Her Other Work.

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On 8/30/2021 at 12:51 PM, Bethluvsfilms said:

Of course you have Henry Fonda as the all-American nice guy who wants to do the right thing  (MISTER ROBERTS, TWELVE ANGRY MEN, THE OX-BOW INCIDENT come to mind) to his cold-blooded, murdering snake-in-the-grass Frank in ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST who has no mercy for his victims (not even a child!).

Also with his ruthless bandit in FIRECREEK, Fonda was also playing against type.

I got another one with Fonda...

Clay Spencer in Spencer's Mountain

versus

Henry Stamper in Sometimes a Great Notion.

"Get your commie pinko butts offa my property. GIT!"

Image 1 - "SOMETIMES A GREAT NOTION"-ORIGINAL PHOTO-HENRY FONDA-MED. SHOT

 

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